Top 1200 Italian Names From A-Z (2024)

Written by Gabriel Cruz - Foodie, Animal Lover, Slang & Language Enthusiast

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Welcome to our ultimate guide, “Top 1200 Italian Names From A-Z (2024)” – your one-stop destination for discovering the charm and elegance of Italian names! Whether you’re searching for the perfect name for your newborn, seeking inspiration for a character in your next novel, or simply intrigued by the melodious sounds of Italian names, you’re in the right place. From timeless classics to contemporary favorites, our comprehensive list will take you on a captivating journey through Italy’s rich cultural heritage, one name at a time. Dive in now and explore the beauty of Italian names – who knows, you might just find the perfect name that resonates with your heart. Let’s embark on this enchanting adventure together – and don’t forget to share your favorite picks in the comments!

A

italian names starts with a

  • Alessandro – A popular Italian name meaning “defender of mankind,” often associated with historical figures like Alexander the Great.
  • Andrea – In Italy, Andrea is a male name derived from the Greek “Andreas,” meaning “manly” or “brave.”
  • Angelo – This name means “angel” or “messenger of God,” reflecting a heavenly or divine quality.
  • Antonio – A timeless Italian name meaning “priceless,” “inestimable” or “praiseworthy.”
  • Adriano – Originating from the Latin “Hadrianus,” this name refers to someone from the town of Adria in Italy.
  • Agostino – Derived from the Latin “Augustinus,” this name honors Saint Augustine and means “venerable” or “esteemed.”
  • Alberto – The Italian version of “Albert,” meaning “noble” and “bright.”
  • Aldo – A short and sweet name often considered to mean “old” or “wise.”
  • Alessio – A variant of Alessandro, meaning “defender” or “helper of mankind.”
  • Alfonso – This name has Germanic origins, meaning “noble” and “ready for battle.”
  • Alfredo – An Italian form of Alfred, meaning “elf counsel” or “wise counselor.”
  • Alvise – A Venetian variant of the name “Ludovico,” which means “famous in war.”
  • Ambrogio – Meaning “immortal,” this name has Greek origins and is associated with Saint Ambrose, the bishop of Milan.
  • Amedeo – A name of Italian origin meaning “lover of God” or “he who loves God.”
  • Amerigo – The name from which “America” is derived, meaning “home ruler.”
  • Anastasio – This name means “resurrection,” and is often associated with the concept of rebirth.
  • Anselmo – A name with Germanic roots meaning “God’s protection” or “helmet of God.”
  • Antonello – A diminutive form of Antonio, meaning “priceless” or “of inestimable worth.”
  • Antonino – A diminutive of Antonio, conveying a sense of endearment or smallness.
  • Ariosto – Possibly derived from the Latin “Arius,” this name was made famous by the Italian poet Ludovico Ariosto.
  • Armando – The Italian version of “Herman,” meaning “soldier” or “army man.”
  • Arnaldo – An Italian form of “Arnold,” meaning “eagle power.”
  • Arrigo – An Italian variant of “Henry,” meaning “home ruler.”
  • Arturo – The Italian version of Arthur, possibly meaning “noble” or “courageous.”
  • Attilio – This name is thought to be of unknown Etruscan origin, but it’s associated with strength and valor.
  • Aurelio – Derived from the Latin “aureus,” meaning “golden” or “gilded.”
  • Azzurro – Meaning “blue” in Italian, this name is often associated with the clear blue sky or sea.
  • Annalisa – A combination of “Anna” and “Lisa,” meaning “grace” and “God is bountiful.”
  • Antonia – A female form of Antonio, meaning “priceless” or “inestimable.”
  • Arianna – The Italian form of “Ariadne,” meaning “most holy.”
  • Alessia – A feminine variant of Alessandro, meaning “defender.”
  • Alma – Meaning “soul” in Italian and Spanish, it suggests depth and spirituality.
  • Angela – The feminine form of Angelo, meaning “angel” or “messenger of God.”
  • Agnese – The Italian form of “Agnes,” meaning “pure” or “holy.”
  • Alba – Meaning “dawn” or “white,” this name symbolizes new beginnings.
  • Alda – A name of Germanic origin meaning “old” or “wise.”
  • Alessandra – The feminine form of Alessandro, meaning “defender of mankind.”
  • Anita – A diminutive of Anna, meaning “grace” or “favor.”
  • Anna – Derived from the Hebrew “Hannah,” meaning “grace” or “favor.”
  • Annabella – A blend of “Anna” and “Bella,” meaning “grace” and “beautiful.”
  • Antonella – A diminutive of Antonia, meaning “priceless” or “inestimable.”
  • Ariadna – A variant of Arianna, referring to the pure and holy.
  • Arsenia – A female form of the name Arsenio, meaning “virile” or “strong.”
  • Asia – Possibly derived from the name of the continent, its origin and meaning are not definitively known.
  • Assunta – Meaning “assumed” in Italian, it refers to the Assumption of Mary into heaven.
  • Aurora – Meaning “dawn” in Latin, this name signifies new beginnings and hope.
  • Adele – Of Germanic origin, meaning “noble” or “nobility.”
  • Agata – The Italian form of “Agatha,” meaning “good” or “virtuous.”
  • Agrippina – An ancient Roman name, possibly derived from the Latin “agrippa” meaning “wild horse.”
  • Albina – Derived from the Latin “albus,” meaning “white” or “bright.”

B

italian names starts with b

  • Beatrice – A name of Latin origin meaning “she who brings happiness; blessed.”
  • Benedetta – Italian for “blessed,” it is the feminine form of Benedetto.
  • Bianca – Derived from the Italian word for “white,” symbolizing purity.
  • Bruno – A Germanic name meaning “brown,” often referring to hair or complexion.
  • Beniamino – The Italian form of Benjamin, meaning “son of the right hand” in Hebrew.
  • Bernardo – Italian and Spanish variant of Bernard, meaning “strong as a bear.”
  • Bettina – A diminutive form of Elisabetta, the Italian version of Elizabeth, meaning “God is my oath.”
  • Bruna – The feminine form of Bruno, meaning “brown” in Italian.
  • Bartolomeo – Italian form of Bartholomew, meaning “son of Talmai” or “son of the furrows.”
  • Baldassare – Italian form of Balthazar, meaning “God protects the king.”
  • Benedetto – The male form of Benedetta, meaning “blessed.”
  • Barbara – A name of Greek origin meaning “foreign” or “strange.”
  • Brando – Derived from a Germanic word meaning “sword” or “fiery torch.”
  • Bonifacio – From Latin origin, meaning “good fate” or “good destiny.”
  • Bice – A diminutive of Beatrice, meaning “she who brings happiness.”
  • Basilio – Italian form of Basil, meaning “king” or “royal.”
  • Biancamaria – A combination of Bianca and Maria, meaning “white” and “beloved” or “of the sea.”
  • Beppe – A diminutive of Giuseppe, the Italian form of Joseph, meaning “he will add.”
  • Bartolo – Short for Bartolomeo, meaning “son of Talmai.”
  • Bortolo – Another variant of Bartolomeo, “son of Talmai.”
  • Belinda – Of uncertain origin, possibly derived from Italian “bella” meaning “beautiful.”
  • Benito – A diminutive of Benedetto, meaning “blessed.”
  • Brunella – A diminutive form of Bruna, meaning “little brown one.”
  • Bambina – Italian for “baby girl” or “little girl.”
  • Brigitte – French form of Bridget, meaning “exalted one” or “strength.”
  • Bibiana – Derived from Vivian, meaning “alive” in Latin.
  • Brizio – Italian form of the name Brice, possibly meaning “speckled” or “freckled.”
  • Berto – Short form of names ending in -berto, like Alberto, meaning “noble” or “bright.”
  • Battista – Italian form of Baptist, meaning “baptizer.”
  • Blanda – From a Latin term meaning “flattering” or “charming.”
  • Beltramo – Italian form of Bertram, meaning “bright raven.”
  • Bambino – Italian for “baby boy” or “child.”
  • Bonaventura – Meaning “good fortune,” from Latin “bona” (good) and “ventura” (fortune).
  • Brigida – Italian form of Bridget, meaning “exalted one” or “strength.”
  • Bonfilia – Derived from Italian words meaning “good daughter.”
  • Bonoso – From Latin origin, meaning “good” or “kind.”
  • Benvenuto – Meaning “welcome” in Italian.
  • Bernadetta – Feminine form of Bernardo, meaning “strong as a bear.”
  • Bettino – A diminutive form of Benedetto, meaning “blessed.”
  • Biagio – Italian form of Blaise, meaning “lisping” or “stammering.”
  • Brunilde – A Germanic name meaning “armed for battle.”
  • Bona – Short for Buona, meaning “good” in Italian.
  • Bonfiglio – Meaning “good son” from Italian “buon” (good) and “figlio” (son).
  • Bonagiunta – From Italian “buona” (good) and “giunta” (joined), possibly meaning “good union.”

C

  • Carla – A feminine form of Carlo, with Germanic roots meaning “free man” or “man.”
  • Carlo – Italian form of Charles, which means “free man.”
  • Chiara – Derived from the Latin “Clara,” meaning “clear, bright, famous.”
  • Claudio – From Latin “Claudius,” meaning “lame” or “enclosure.”
  • Claudia – Feminine form of Claudio, with the same Latin origins.
  • Cesare – Italian version of Caesar, which implies “long-haired” or “emperor.”
  • Caterina – Italian form of Catherine, meaning “pure.”
  • Camilla – A name of ancient Roman origin, possibly meaning “attendant” for a religious ceremony.
  • Cristian – Italian form of Christian, meaning “follower of Christ.”
  • Cristina – Feminine form of Cristian, also meaning “follower of Christ.”
  • Carmine – From the Hebrew word “karmel,” meaning “garden” or “vineyard.”
  • Carmela – Feminine form of Carmine, also meaning “garden” or “vineyard.”
  • Cosimo – Italian form of Cosmas, from Greek “kosmos,” meaning “order, decency.”
  • Concetta – Derived from the Italian concept of the Immaculate Conception (“concezione immacolata”).
  • Corrado – Italian form of Conrad, meaning “bold counsel.”
  • Costanza – Italian form of Constance, meaning “steadfastness.”
  • Callisto – From the Greek “kallistos,” meaning “most beautiful.”
  • Calogero – Originates from Greek “kalos geros,” meaning “beautiful elder.”
  • Carmelo – Masculine form of Carmela, also linked to Mount Carmel in Israel.
  • Carmelina – Diminutive of Carmela, also related to Mount Carmel.
  • Carolina – Feminine form of Carolus, the Latin version of Charles, meaning “free man.”
  • Caterino – Diminutive form of Caterina, meaning “pure.”
  • Celeste – Means “heavenly” or “celestial” in Italian.
  • Celso – Derived from the Latin “Celsus,” meaning “tall” or “lofty.”
  • Cesarina – Feminine form of Cesare, also implying “emperor” or “ruler.”
  • Cettina – Diminutive of Concetta, related to the concept of the Immaculate Conception.
  • Chiaretta – Diminutive form of Chiara, meaning “clear” or “bright.”
  • Cino – Possibly a diminutive of names ending in -cino, or related to the Italian word “cino,” meaning “shoot” or “sprout.”
  • Cira – Feminine form of Cyril, from Greek “kyrios,” meaning “lord.”
  • Cirillo – Italian form of Cyril, meaning “lord.”
  • Claretta – Diminutive form of Clara, meaning “clear” or “bright.”
  • Clarissa – An elaborated form of Clara, meaning “clear, bright, famous.”
  • Clelia – An Italian name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to Greek “kleos,” meaning “glory.”
  • Cleto – Shortened form of Anacleto, meaning “called back” or “invoked” in Greek.
  • Clotilde – From the Germanic “hlod” and “hild,” meaning “fame” and “battle.”
  • Colomba – Italian for “dove,” symbolizing peace.
  • Colombo – Italian for “dove,” masculine form of Colomba.
  • Concettina – Diminutive of Concetta, referring to the Immaculate Conception.
  • Corinna – Derived from the Greek “korē,” meaning “maiden” or “virgin.”
  • Cornelio – Italian form of Cornelius, possibly meaning “horn.”
  • Cosetta – Diminutive form of Cosima, from Greek “kosmos,” meaning “order, decency.”
  • Cosma – Italian form of Cosmas, which means “order, beauty.”
  • Costanzo – Masculine form of Costanza, meaning “steadfastness.”
  • Crescenzo – From the Latin “crescens,” meaning “growing” or “increasing.”
  • Cristiana – Feminine form of Cristian, meaning “follower of Christ.”
  • Cristoforo – Italian form of Christopher, meaning “bearer of Christ.”
  • Crocifissa – Derived from the Italian word “crocifisso,” meaning “crucified,” referring to the crucifixion of Jesus.
  • Cunegonda – Italian form of Kunigunde, a German name meaning “brave in war.”
  • Cuzio – Possibly a variant of Cosimo or a diminutive of names starting with “Cu-.”
  • Cypriano – Italian form of Cyprian, meaning “from Cyprus.”
 

D

  • Dafne – Derived from Greek mythology, Dafne is the Italian version of Daphne, meaning “laurel.”
  • Damiano – An Italian variant of Damian, Damiano signifies “to tame” or “subdue.”
  • Daniele – The Italian form of Daniel, Daniele means “God is my judge.”
  • Dario – An Italian name with Persian roots, Dario means “possessor of the good.”
  • Davide – The Italian version of David, Davide signifies “beloved.”
  • Debora – An Italian variant of Deborah, Debora means “bee” in Hebrew.
  • Delfina – Meaning “dolphin,” Delfina is the Italian feminine form of Delphinus.
  • Delia – A name with Greek origin, Delia is another name for the goddess Artemis, who was born on the island of Delos.
  • Demetrio – The Italian form of Demetrius, Demetrio is associated with Demeter, the Greek goddess of agriculture.
  • Domenico – Meaning “belonging to the Lord,” Domenico is the Italian version of Dominic.
  • Donatella – A diminutive form of Donata, Donatella means “given by God” in Italian.
  • Donato – An Italian name meaning “given” or “present from God.”
  • Doriano – The Italian version of Dorian, Doriano refers to the ancient Greek tribe, the Dorians.
  • Doretta – A diminutive of Dora, Doretta means “gift” in Greek.
  • Doria – Derived from the Greek Doris, Doria refers to the Dorian tribe or the sea.
  • Duccio – A diminutive of the name Dulce, Duccio is an affectionate Italian name.
  • Duilio – An Italian name, Duilio is possibly derived from the Roman family name Duilius, meaning “war.”
  • Dante – Short for Durante, Dante means “enduring” and is famously borne by the poet Dante Alighieri.
  • Dina – A short form of names like Bernardina or Giordina, Dina means “judged” or “vindicated.”
  • Dino – A diminutive of names ending in “-dino,” Dino is often associated with “little sword.”
  • Dionisia – The Italian feminine form of Dionysius, Dionisia refers to the Greek god Dionysus.
  • Dionisio – An Italian name derived from Dionysus, the Greek god of wine and festivity.
  • Dolores – Meaning “sorrows,” Dolores is derived from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary, María de los Dolores.
  • Domenica – The feminine form of Domenico, Domenica means “belonging to the Lord” and refers to the Lord’s day, Sunday.
  • Domizia – A female Italian name, Domizia is derived from the Latin Domitius, possibly meaning “tamed.”
  • Donatello – A diminutive of Donato, Donatello means “gift from God” and is also the name of a renowned Italian sculptor.
  • Dorotea – The Italian version of Dorothy, Dorotea means “gift of God.”
  • Drusilla – An Italian name, Drusilla is a diminutive form of the Roman family name Drusus, which might mean “strong.”
  • Duccia – A diminutive form of Educcia, Duccia is an affectionate Italian name.
  • Dulcina – An Italian name, Dulcina is a variant of Dulcie, meaning “sweetness.”
  • Damiana – The feminine form of Damian, Damiana means “to tame” or “subdue.”
  • Danilo – An Italian form of Daniel, Danilo means “God is my judge.”
  • Delfino – Meaning “dolphin,” Delfino is the Italian masculine form of Delphina.
  • Demetra – A variant of Demeter, the Greek goddess of agriculture, Demetra means “earth mother.”
  • Desideria – A female name derived from the Latin “desiderium,” Desideria means “longing” or “desire.”
  • Desiderio – The masculine version of Desideria, Desiderio means “longing” or “desire.”
  • Diana – A name of Latin origin, Diana was the Roman goddess of the hunt, moon, and childbirth.
  • Diletta – Meaning “beloved” in Italian, Diletta is derived from the Latin “dilectus.”
  • Dionigi – An Italian form of Dionysius, Dionigi is associated with the Greek god of wine.
  • Dionis – A shortened form of Dionisio, Dionis also refers to the Greek god Dionysus.
  • Dora – A short form of names like Theodora, Dora means “gift” in Greek.
  • Doris – Derived from the Greek Dōris, Doris means “Dorian woman” or can refer to the sea.
  • Duarte – An Iberian variant of Edward, Duarte means “wealthy guardian.”
  • Dulce – Meaning “sweet” in Latin, Dulce is a name that reflects sweetness and charm.
  • Dulcinea – An elaborated form of Dulce, Dulcinea means “sweet” and is famously used by Cervantes in “Don Quixote.”
  • Daria – The feminine form of Darius, Daria means “possessing goodness.”
  • Davina – A feminine form of David, Davina means “beloved.”
  • Dea – Meaning “goddess” in Italian, Dea is a name that exudes divinity and grace.
  • Diego – A Spanish name also popular in Italy, Diego is believed to be derived from Santiago or may mean “supplanter.”

E

  • Edoardo – An Italian variant of the name Edward, meaning “wealthy guardian.”
  • Elena – Derived from the Greek name Helen, it means “shining light” or “bright one.”
  • Elia – The Italian form of Elijah, meaning “Yahweh is God.”
  • Elisabetta – The Italian version of Elizabeth, meaning “God is my oath.”
  • Elio – From the Greek Helios, it means “sun.”
  • Elisa – A short form of Elisabetta, meaning “God is my oath.”
  • Eliseo – The Italian form of Elisha, meaning “God is salvation.”
  • Elvira – Of uncertain origin, possibly meaning “all true” in Gothic or “foreign truth.”
  • Emanuela – Feminine form of Emanuele, meaning “God is with us.”
  • Emanuele – The Italian form of Immanuel, meaning “God is with us.”
  • Emilia – Feminine form of Aemilius, meaning “rival” or “striving.”
  • Emiliano – An Italian name derived from the Roman family name Aemilianus, meaning “rival.”
  • Emilio – The Italian form of Emil, meaning “rival” or “eager.”
  • Emma – Of Germanic origin, meaning “whole” or “universal.”
  • Ennio – Possibly of Etruscan origin, the meaning is not known.
  • Enrica – Feminine form of Enrico, meaning “home ruler.”
  • Enrico – The Italian version of Henry, meaning “home ruler.”
  • Enza – A short form of Vincenza, meaning “conquering.”
  • Enzo – A short form of names ending in -enzo, such as Vincenzo, meaning “conquering.”
  • Ercole – The Italian form of Hercules, meaning “glory of Hera.”
  • Erica – The feminine form of Eric, meaning “eternal ruler.”
  • Erika – A variant spelling of Erica, meaning “eternal ruler.”
  • Erminia – Derived from the Germanic element “ermen” meaning “whole, universal.”
  • Ernesta – Feminine form of Ernesto, meaning “serious” or “battle to the death.”
  • Ernesto – The Italian form of Ernest, meaning “serious” or “battle to the death.”
  • Ersilia – Possibly derived from the Latin “ersilia,” meaning “delicate.”
  • Esmeralda – Means “emerald” in Spanish and Italian.
  • Ester – The Italian form of Esther, possibly meaning “star” or “myrtle leaf.”
  • Estrella – Spanish for “star,” sometimes used in Italian contexts.
  • Ettore – The Italian form of Hector, meaning “holding fast.”
  • Eugenia – Feminine form of Eugenio, meaning “well-born” or “noble.”
  • Eugenio – Derived from the Greek name Eugenios, meaning “well-born” or “noble.”
  • Eulalia – From Greek, meaning “sweetly speaking.”
  • Eusebio – Derived from the Greek name Eusebios, meaning “pious.”
  • Eva – The Italian form of Eve, meaning “life” or “living one.”
  • Evelina – A variant of Eveline, meaning “desired” or “water, island.”
  • Ezechiele – The Italian form of Ezekiel, meaning “God strengthens.”
  • Ezio – An Italian name meaning “eagle.”
  • Edda – Possibly derived from Germanic roots meaning “with clear goals.”
  • Edgardo – The Italian variant of Edgar, meaning “wealthy spear.”
  • Edilio – A name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to the Latin word “aedilis,” meaning “public building official.”
  • Edmondo – The Italian form of Edmund, meaning “wealthy protection.”
  • Eduardo – The Italian form of Edward, meaning “wealthy guardian.”
  • Efisio – Possibly derived from the Greek name Ephesios, meaning “belonging to Ephesus.”
  • Egisto – Derived from the Greek name Aegisthus, which is of unknown meaning.
  • Eladia – Feminine form of the Spanish name Eladio, from the Greek Helladios, meaning “Greek.”
  • Elda – Possibly a short form of names ending with -elda, or from the Germanic element “hild” meaning “battle.”
  • Eleonora – The Italian form of Eleanor, possibly meaning “shining light” or “foreign.”
  • Elettra – The Italian form of Electra, meaning “amber,” “shining,” or “incandescent.”
  • Eliana – Of Hebrew origin, meaning “my God has answered” or possibly a variant of Aeliana, from the Roman family name Aelianus, meaning “sun.”

F

  • Fabiana – A feminine name derived from the Latin “Fabianus,” meaning “of the Fabius family.”
  • Fabiano – A masculine version of Fabiana, also related to the Roman family name Fabius.
  • Fabio – A popular Italian name meaning “bean grower,” from the Roman family name Fabius.
  • Fabiola – A diminutive of Fabia, the feminine form of Fabius, often associated with Saint Fabiola of Rome.
  • Fabrizia – Feminine form of Fabrizio, meaning “craftsman” or “artisan.”
  • Fabrizio – A masculine name with Latin origins, meaning “works with the hands,” particularly skilled in craftsmanship.
  • Fara – A name of uncertain meaning, possibly derived from an old Italian term for “iron” or “iron smith.”
  • Fausta – A name meaning “fortunate” or “auspicious,” the feminine form of Faustus.
  • Fausto – The masculine form of Fausta, also meaning “fortunate” or “auspicious.”
  • Fedora – An Italian name derived from the Greek Theodora, meaning “gift of God.”
  • Fedra – From the Greek “Phaedra,” meaning “bright” or “radiant.”
  • Felice – An Italian name meaning “happy” or “fortunate,” the equivalent of the English name Felix.
  • Felicia – The feminine form of Felice, also meaning “happy” or “fortunate.”
  • Feliciano – A derivative of Felice, meaning “happy” or “fortunate.”
  • Felicita – An Italian name meaning “happiness” or “good fortune.”
  • Felino – A name that could be derived from the Latin “felinus,” meaning “cat-like” or “relating to a cat.”
  • Felisa – A variant of Felicia, meaning “happy” or “fortunate.”
  • Felizio – Possibly a variant of Felicio, meaning “lucky” or “successful.”
  • Ferdinando – An Italian version of Ferdinand, meaning “bold voyager.”
  • Fernanda – The feminine form of Fernando, meaning “adventurous” or “brave traveler.”
  • Fernando – An Italian name meaning “bold voyager,” from the Germanic elements “fardi” (journey) and “nand” (ready).
  • Ferruccio – Derived from the Italian word “ferro” (iron), meaning “strong as iron.”
  • Fiamma – Meaning “flame” in Italian, often symbolizing passion or a fiery spirit.
  • Fiammetta – A diminutive form of Fiamma, meaning “little flame.”
  • Fianna – An Italian name possibly derived from the old Irish term “fiann” meaning “warrior band.”
  • Fidelio – From the Latin “fidelis” meaning “faithful,” often associated with loyalty.
  • Filiberto – An Italian name meaning “very bright” from the Germanic elements “filu” (very) and “beraht” (bright).
  • Filippo – The Italian form of Philip, meaning “lover of horses.”
  • Filomena – Derived from the Greek “philoumenos,” meaning “beloved.”
  • Fiore – An Italian name meaning “flower,” symbolizing beauty and nature.
  • Fiorella – A diminutive of Fiore, meaning “little flower.”
  • Fiorenza – A feminine form of Fiorenzo, meaning “blooming” or “flourishing.”
  • Fiorenzo – A masculine name meaning “blooming” or “flourishing,” related to Florence, Italy.
  • Flaminia – A name of Latin origin, meaning “Roman priestess” or “belonging to a priest.”
  • Flaviano – Derived from the Latin “Flavianus,” meaning “golden” or “yellow-haired.”
  • Flavio – A name meaning “blond” or “golden-haired,” from the Latin “flavus.”
  • Flavia – The feminine form of Flavio, also meaning “blond” or “golden-haired.”
  • Floriana – A variant of Flora, meaning “flowering” or “in bloom.”
  • Floriano – A masculine version of Floriana, meaning “flowering” or “in bloom.”
  • Florinda – A name that could be a variant of Floriana, also meaning “flowering” or “in bloom.”
  • Fulvia – A name of Latin origin, meaning “blond” or “yellow-haired.”
  • Fulvio – The masculine form of Fulvia, meaning “blond” or “yellow-haired.”
  • Fosco – An Italian name meaning “dark,” “dusky,” or “swarthy.”
  • Franco – Derived from the medieval Latin “francus,” meaning “free one,” or associated with the Franks.
  • Francesca – The feminine form of Francesco, meaning “free one” or “from France.”
  • Francesco – An Italian name meaning “Frenchman” or “free one,” famously borne by Saint Francis of Assisi.
  • Franca – A feminine form of Franco, meaning “free one” or “from France.”
  • Franchina – A diminutive of Franca, meaning “little free one” or “little Frenchwoman.”
  • Franzone – A name of uncertain origin, possibly a variant of Franco or a nickname meaning “big Frank.”

G

  • Gabriele – A unisex name of Hebrew origin meaning “God is my strength.”
  • Gaetano – Derived from the name of the Italian city of Gaeta, it implies one who is from that area.
  • Gennaro – An Italian name meaning “January,” often associated with the patron saint of Naples.
  • Gian – A short form of Giovanni, which is the Italian form of “John,” meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Giancarlo – A compound name combining “Gian” with “Carlo,” meaning “John Charles.”
  • Gianfranco – A combination of “Gian” and “Franco,” it can be translated to “John Frank.”
  • Gianluca – This name fuses “Gian” with “Luca,” meaning “John Luke.”
  • Gianmarco – A melding of “Gian” and “Marco,” meaning “John Mark.”
  • Gianni – A diminutive of Giovanni, meaning “little John” or “God is gracious.”
  • Gino – Often a diminutive of Luigino or Eugenio, it can mean “well-born” or “noble.”
  • Gioacchino – The Italian form of Joachim, possibly meaning “established by God.”
  • Giordano – Italian form of “Jordan,” referring to the river or “to flow down.”
  • Giorgio – Italian version of George, meaning “farmer” or “earth-worker.”
  • Giovanni – Italian for “John,” meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Giuliano – From Julius, meaning “youthful” or “downy-bearded.”
  • Giulio – Italian form of Julius, implying “youthful” or “Jove’s child.”
  • Giuseppe – The Italian form of Joseph, meaning “He will add” or “God shall increase.”
  • Graziano – Meaning “pleasing” or “agreeable,” possibly from the Latin “gratianus.”
  • Gregorio – Italian form of Gregory, meaning “watchful” or “vigilant.”
  • Guido – An Italian name meaning “forest” or “guide.”
  • Giulia – Feminine form of Giulio, meaning “youthful” or “soft-haired.”
  • Giada – Italian for “jade,” referring to the precious green stone.
  • Gianna – A diminutive of Giovanna, the feminine form of Giovanni, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Ginevra – Italian for “juniper” or the Italian form of Guinevere.
  • Gioia – Meaning “joy” in Italian.
  • Giovanna – The feminine form of Giovanni, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Giuliana – Feminine form of Giuliano, meaning “youthful.”
  • Giuseppina – Feminine form of Giuseppe, meaning “God shall increase.”
  • Gloria – Latin for “glory” or “fame.”
  • Graziella – A diminutive of Grazia, which means “grace” in Italian.
  • Greta – A short form of Margareta, meaning “pearl” in Italian.
  • Gabi – Likely a diminutive of Gabriela or Gabriele, meaning “God is my strength.”
  • Gaia – From the Greek for “earth” and also the name of the earth goddess.
  • Galdino – Possibly derived from the Germanic element “walt,” meaning “rule.”
  • Galileo – From the name Galilei, meaning “of Galilee,” which is a region in Northern Israel.
  • Gaspare – The Italian form of Jasper, meaning “treasurer.”
  • Gavino – From the Latin “gabinus,” meaning “from Gabium,” a town in ancient Italy.
  • Gerardo – Italian form of Gerard, meaning “strong with the spear.”
  • Germano – Meaning “brother” or “from Germany.”
  • Gerolamo – Italian form of Jerome, meaning “sacred name.”
  • Gilberto – The Italian version of Gilbert, meaning “bright pledge.”
  • Gilda – Perhaps from the Old English “gyldan,” meaning “to gild” or “golden.”
  • Ginepro – Italian for “juniper.”
  • Giobbe – The Italian form of Job, meaning “persecuted.”
  • Gioele – Italian form of Joel, meaning “Jehovah is his God.”
  • Giordana – Feminine form of Giordano, meaning “flowing down.”
  • Giorgina – Feminine form of Giorgio, meaning “farmer” or “earth-worker.”
  • Giosuè – Italian form of Joshua, meaning “God is salvation.”
  • Girasole – Italian for “sunflower.”
  • Gisella – Italian form of Giselle, meaning “pledge” or “hostage.”

H

  • Haldo – A variation of Harold, originating from Old Norse meaning “leader of the army.”
  • Halem – Possibly a variant of the name Halem, which does not have a widely recognized meaning in Italian.
  • Hanbal – An Arabic name meaning “purity,” not traditionally Italian.
  • Handel – More commonly a German surname associated with the composer George Frideric Handel, not Italian.
  • Hannibal – Of Phoenician origin meaning “grace of Baal,” known for the Carthaginian general who crossed the Alps.
  • Hanri – Likely a variant of the name Henri, the French form of Henry, meaning “home ruler.”
  • Hanzo – A Japanese name meaning “hidden” or “secret,” not of Italian origin.
  • Haralambie – A name of Greek origin meaning “shining with happiness,” not traditional in Italian culture.
  • Haraldo – The Italian version of Harold, meaning “leader of the army.”
  • Harlan – Of English origin meaning “rocky land,” not commonly found in Italian naming traditions.
  • Harlo – A variant of Harlow, an English surname meaning “rock hill,” not traditionally Italian.
  • Harmen – A Dutch and German name meaning “soldier” or “warrior,” not Italian.
  • Haroldo – An Italian variant of the name Harold, meaning “leader of the army.”
  • Harone – This name does not have a clear meaning in Italian and may not be of Italian origin.
  • Harri – A variant of Harry, itself a medieval form of Henry, meaning “home ruler.”
  • Harriet – An English name derived from Henriette, the female form of Henry; not Italian.
  • Harris – An English surname meaning “son of Harry,” not of Italian origin.
  • Harry – An English medieval form of Henry, which means “home ruler,” not typically Italian.
  • Hartmann – Germanic in origin, meaning “strong man,” not traditionally Italian.
  • Harvard – An English name meaning “army guard,” not Italian.
  • Havel – A Czech and Slovak surname derived from a personal name, not Italian.
  • Haven – An English name meaning “safe place,” not of Italian origin.
  • Hayato – A Japanese name meaning “falcon person,” not Italian.
  • Hayward – An English occupational surname for a keeper of fences, not Italian.
  • Hazel – An English name referring to the hazelnut tree, not traditionally Italian.
  • Hazzan – A Hebrew term for a Jewish cantor, not an Italian name.
  • Heath – An English name referring to a moorland, not of Italian origin.
  • Hector – Of Greek origin meaning “holding fast,” known from Homer’s “Iliad,” not traditionally Italian.
  • Hedda – A female name of Germanic origin meaning “battle,” not Italian.
  • Hedwig – A German name meaning “war” and “battle,” not typically found in Italian naming traditions.
  • Heiko – A diminutive of Heinrich, which is German for Henry, meaning “home ruler,” not Italian.
  • Heinrich – German for Henry, meaning “home ruler,” not an Italian name.
  • Heinz – A German diminutive of Heinrich, meaning “home ruler,” not Italian.
  • Helga – Of Norse origin meaning “holy,” not a traditional Italian name.
  • Helio – Derived from the Greek Helios, meaning “sun,” not commonly Italian.
  • Helios – The personification of the sun in Greek mythology, not Italian.
  • Helmut – A German name meaning “helmet” and “protection,” not Italian.
  • Henning – A Low German diminutive of Heinrich, meaning “home ruler,” not Italian.
  • Henri – The French form of Henry, meaning “home ruler,” not Italian but used in Italian-speaking regions.
  • Henrick – A variant of Heinrich, German for Henry, meaning “home ruler,” not Italian.
  • Henry – Of Germanic origin meaning “home ruler,” occasionally used in Italian as Enrico.
  • Hera – The name of the Greek goddess of marriage and childbirth, not an Italian name.
  • Herbert – Of Germanic origin meaning “bright army,” not traditionally Italian.
  • Herbie – A diminutive of Herbert, meaning “bright army,” not Italian.
  • Heriberto – A Spanish and Portuguese variant of Herbert, meaning “bright army,” not Italian.
  • Herman – Of Germanic origin meaning “army man,” not traditionally Italian.
  • Hermann – Another form of Herman, meaning “army man,” not Italian.
  • Herminio – Of Spanish origin, possibly derived from the name Hermes, not Italian.
  • Hernan – A Spanish name derived from Ferdinand, meaning “bold voyager,” not Italian.
  • Hernando – A Spanish variant of Ferdinand, meaning “bold voyager,” not Italian.

I

  • Ilario: A name of Latin origin meaning “cheerful” or “happy.”
  • Ileana: Possibly derived from the Greek “Helene,” meaning “torch” or “light.”
  • Ilaria: The feminine form of Ilario, sharing the same cheerful meaning.
  • Ilda: Short form of names containing the Germanic element “hild,” meaning “battle.”
  • Ildebrando: An old Germanic name, composed of elements meaning “battle sword.”
  • Ildefonso: Of Gothic origin, meaning “ready for battle.”
  • Ilenia: Italian form of the Greek name “Helen,” meaning “shining light.”
  • Ilia: A name that can be of Hebrew origin, meaning “the Lord is my God” or of Greek origin, referring to the Trojan prophetess.
  • Iliria: Referring to the ancient region of Illyria in the Balkans.
  • Illario: Variant of Ilario, sharing the same meaning of joyfulness.
  • Ilva: An Italian name that might be related to the name of the island Ilva, now known as Elba.
  • Imelda: A name of Germanic origin meaning “universal battle.”
  • Immacolata: Italian for “immaculate,” often referring to the Immaculate Conception of Mary.
  • Imogene: Possibly a variant of the name Imogen, of uncertain meaning but often associated with “maiden” or “innocent.”
  • Ina: A diminutive of names ending in -ina, or a standalone name meaning “strong” or “pure.”
  • Incoronata: Italian for “crowned,” often in a religious context.
  • Indro: A unique Italian name possibly derived from Indra, the Hindu god of rain and thunder.
  • Ines: The Italian and Portuguese form of Agnes, meaning “chaste” or “holy.”
  • Inez: Spanish variant of Ines, with the same meaning.
  • Inga: A name of Scandinavian origin, related to the Norse god Ing.
  • Inge: Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element “Ing,” referring to the Norse god.
  • Ingrid: Of Norse origin, meaning “beautiful” or “fair.”
  • Innocenza: Italian for “innocence,” often bearing a pure and virtuous connotation.
  • Innocenzo: The male form of Innocenza, also meaning “innocent.”
  • Ino: In Greek mythology, Ino was a mortal queen who became a sea goddess.
  • Iolanda: Italian form of Yolanda, possibly meaning “violet flower.”
  • Iole: From Greek mythology, Iole was a princess known for her beauty.
  • Iona: A name of Scottish origin, taken from a small island in the Inner Hebrides.
  • Ippolita: Italian form of Hippolyta, meaning “freer of horses,” from Greek mythology.
  • Ippolito: Italian form of Hippolytus, meaning “freer of horses,” also from Greek mythology.
  • Ira: In Latin, it means “wrath,” but it’s also a common given name in various cultures.
  • Irene: Derived from the Greek word “eirene,” meaning “peace.”
  • Iride: Italian for “iris,” the colorful part of the eye or the flower.
  • Irina: Russian form of Irene, also meaning “peace.”
  • Iris: From the Greek word for “rainbow” and the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow.
  • Irma: Of German origin, meaning “world” or “universal.”
  • Isa: Short for Isabella or Elisabetta in Italian, or a name itself meaning “strong-willed.”
  • Isaia: Italian form of Isaiah, a biblical name meaning “Yahweh is salvation.”
  • Isaura: Refers to an ancient region in Asia Minor or may mean “soft air” in Greek.
  • Isidora: Feminine form of Isidore, meaning “gift of Isis” in Greek.
  • Isidoro: Italian form of Isidore, meaning “gift of Isis.”
  • Ismaele: Italian form of Ishmael, a biblical name meaning “God will hear.”
  • Isotta: Italian variant of Isolde, a name of uncertain origin, possibly meaning “ice ruler.”
  • Itala: Feminine form of Italo, referring to Italy or being Italian.
  • Italia: The Italian name for Italy, derived from Latin.
  • Italo: Means “from Italy” or “Italian.”
  • Iva: Slavic short form of Ivana or Ivanna, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Ivana: Feminine form of Ivano, the Italian version of John, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Ivano: Italian form of John, meaning “God is gracious.”

J

  • Jacopo: An Italian variant of Jacob, meaning “supplanter” or “held by the heel.”
  • Jada: Derived from Hebrew, meaning “wise” or a gemstone name referring to jade.
  • Jago: A Cornish and Spanish variant of James, meaning “supplanter.”
  • Jalissa: A modern American name that may be a blend of Ja- prefix with Alissa.
  • Jamila: An Arabic name meaning “beautiful,” used in various cultures.
  • Jan: A name of Dutch and Scandinavian origin, a variant of John meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Jana: A Slavic name meaning “God is gracious,” also a variant of Jane.
  • Janco: A rare name that might be a diminutive form of Slavic names beginning with “Jan-.”
  • Janelle: A French diminutive form of Jane, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Janetta: A diminutive form of Jane, which is a feminine form of John.
  • Janina: A Polish diminutive of Jane, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Janira: Possibly derived from Janus, the Roman god of beginnings and transitions.
  • Janna: A variant of Jana, often used in Northern Europe, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Jara: A Slavic name meaning “spring,” or could be related to the Spanish word for “huntress.”
  • Jari: A Finnish name derived from the Greek name Georgios, meaning “farmer” or “earth-worker.”
  • Jaromir: A Slavic name meaning “peace” and “world” or “fame.”
  • Jasmina: A Persian name meaning “jasmine flower,” the feminine form of Jasmin.
  • Jasmine: An English name derived from the Persian word for the jasmine flower.
  • Jason: An ancient Greek name meaning “healer,” known from Greek mythology.
  • Javeria: An Arabic name meaning “bringer of happiness.”
  • Jax: A modern invented name, possibly a short form of Jackson or Jaxon.
  • Jay: Derived from the jaybird, it is also a short form of names beginning with J.
  • Jayden: A modern American name that may be a blend of Jay and Aiden.
  • Jelena: A Slavic and Eastern European form of Helen, meaning “bright, shining light.”
  • Jemima: A Hebrew name meaning “dove,” known from the Old Testament.
  • Jenna: A variant of Jenny, which is originally a diminutive of Jane.
  • Jennaro: An Italian variant of Januarius, meaning “January” in Latin.
  • Jennifer: A Cornish form of Guinevere, meaning “white phantom” or “fair one.”
  • Jeremia: A variant of Jeremiah, a Hebrew name meaning “exalted by God.”
  • Jessica: First used by Shakespeare, possibly derived from the biblical name Iscah.
  • Jessy: A diminutive form of Jessica or a variant spelling of Jessie.
  • Jesus: The English form of Yeshua, a Hebrew name meaning “salvation.”
  • Jet: Named after the black gemstone or could be a short form of Jethro.
  • Jethro: A Hebrew name meaning “excellence” or “abundance,” known from the Old Testament.
  • Jevan: A Welsh name meaning “young warrior” or a variant of Evan.
  • Jimena: A Spanish name, possibly a variant of Ximena, meaning “listener.”
  • Jimmy: A diminutive of James, meaning “supplanter.”
  • Joana: A Portuguese and Catalan form of Joanna, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Joanina: An elaborated form of Joan, which is a feminine form of John.
  • Joaquina: A feminine form of Joaquin, the Spanish version of Joachim, meaning “lifted by Yahweh.”
  • Jocasta: A Greek name possibly meaning “shining moon,” known from Greek mythology.
  • Jodie: A variant of Jody, which is a diminutive of Joseph or Judith.
  • Joel: A Hebrew name meaning “Yahweh is God.”
  • Johanna: A German, Dutch, and Scandinavian form of Joanna, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • John: An English form of the Hebrew name Yochanan meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Jon: A short form of Jonathan or John, often used in Scandinavia and the Basque region.
  • Jona: A variant of Jonah, a Hebrew name meaning “dove.”
  • Jonatan: A variant spelling of Jonathan, a Hebrew name meaning “given by God.”
  • Jone: A Basque feminine form of John, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Jordan: Derived from the river Jordan, meaning “flow down” or “descend” in Hebrew.

K

Creating a list of Italian names starting with the letter “K” is a bit challenging, as “K” is not a traditional letter in the Italian alphabet, and names starting with “K” are relatively rare in Italian culture. However, in modern times, with the influence of other cultures and languages, some names starting with “K” can be found. Here’s a list of 50 names that could be used in an Italian context:

  • Kaira – An Italian variant of the name Chiara, meaning “clear” or “bright.”
  • Kalina – This name is not typically Italian but Slavic in origin, meaning “viburnum,” a type of flowering shrub.
  • Kamillo – The Italian form of Camillo, derived from the Latin “camillus,” meaning a youth employed in religious services.
  • Kandra – Not a traditional Italian name, it might be a variation of Cassandra or Sandra.
  • Kara – While Kara is not an Italian name, in Italian it could be interpreted as “dear” or “beloved” from the word “cara.”
  • Karina – An Italian take on Carina, which means “dear little one.”
  • Karlo – The Italian equivalent of Charles, meaning “free man.”
  • Karmina – A variation of Carmine or Carmen, meaning “song” or “poem” in Italian.
  • Kassandra – Italian form of Cassandra, which means “she who entangles men” in Greek mythology, not traditionally Italian.
  • Katia – A diminutive of Ekaterina, the Russian form of Katherine, meaning “pure.”
  • Katina – A diminutive form of Ekaterina or an Italian variation of Catina, meaning “pure.”
  • Katrina – An Italian form of Catherine, meaning “pure,” though more common in Germanic languages.
  • Kaya – Not traditionally Italian; it has various origins and meanings, including “restful place” in Japanese.
  • Kayla – Originating from Hebrew and Arabic, it means “crown” or “laurel.”
  • Keandra – A modern name, not of Italian origin, possibly a blend of Ke- prefix with the name Andrea.
  • Keila – A variant of Keila, which is not Italian and has Hebrew origins meaning “citadel” or “fortress.”
  • Kelda – More Norse than Italian, meaning “fountain” or “spring.”
  • Kellen – Of Gaelic origin, meaning “slender” or “fair,” not traditionally Italian.
  • Kelso – A Scottish surname referring to a place, not Italian in origin.
  • Kelvin – Originated as a Scottish surname from a river name, not Italian.
  • Kendra – A modern English name derived from the Old English “Cenric,” meaning “bold power,” not Italian.
  • Kenia – Likely a variant of Kenya, the country name, or a form of Keziah, a Hebrew name.
  • Kenzo – A Japanese name meaning “wise one,” not Italian.
  • Kera – Could be considered a variant of Cara, meaning “beloved” in Italian.
  • Keri – A variant spelling of Kerry, a name of Irish origin, not Italian.
  • Kerina – Possibly a variant of Carina, meaning “dear little one” in Italian.
  • Kiana – An American name possibly derived from Diana, but it is not of Italian origin.
  • Kiara – The Italian form of Chiara, which means “light” or “clear.”
  • Kiera – An Irish name meaning “little dark one,” not Italian.
  • Kiko – A Japanese nickname typically, not Italian.
  • Kira – A variant of Ciara or the Russian name for Katherine, meaning “lord” or “ruler.”
  • Kiria – Not a traditional Italian name and may be a variation of Kyria, a Greek title for a lady.
  • Kiro – Not an Italian name; it is a diminutive of the Slavic name Kiril.
  • Kita – Not Italian, it could be Japanese for “north” or a variant of Keita, an African name.
  • Klara – The Italian version of Clara, meaning “clear,” “bright,” or “famous.”
  • Klaudio – An Italian form of Claudius, meaning “lame” or “crippled.”
  • Klea – A variant of Clea, a short form of Cleopatra, not traditionally Italian.
  • Kleo – A short form of Cleopatra, which is Greek, meaning “glory of the father.”
  • Klio – The Italian form of Clio, one of the nine muses in Greek mythology, meaning “glory.”
  • Klodia – Likely a variant of Claudia, the feminine form of Claudius, which is Latin, not traditionally Italian.
  • Koko – Not an Italian name; it is often a nickname or a name from other cultures.
  • Kolina – Not traditionally Italian, it might be a variant of Colina, which is Spanish for “hill.”
  • Kolombo – The Italian form of Columbus, the Latinized version of the surname of the explorer Christopher Columbus.
  • Konni – Not an Italian name, possibly a variant of Connie, which is a diminutive of Constance.
  • Konrad – A German name meaning “bold counsel,” not Italian.
  • Koralia – A variant of Coralie, which is French, not Italian.
  • Korina – Possibly a variant of Corinna, which means “maiden” in Greek.
  • Kristian – The Italian form of Christian, meaning “follower of Christ.”
  • Kristina – An Italian form of Christina, meaning “follower of Christ.”
  • Kurtis – An English name derived from Curtis, meaning “courteous,” not Italian.

Please note that these names may not be traditionally Italian, but they are names that could be used in an Italian-speaking context.

L

  • Luca – A popular Italian name often associated with the Latin word “lux,” meaning light.
  • Lorenzo – An Italian variation of Lawrence, meaning “from Laurentum” or “laurel-crowned.”
  • Leonardo – Meaning “brave as a lion,” it’s a name made famous by the artist Leonardo da Vinci.
  • Laura – Derived from the Latin “laurus,” meaning “laurel plant,” a symbol of honor and victory.
  • Lucia – A name with Latin origins meaning “light,” associated with Saint Lucia.
  • Livia – An ancient Roman name, possibly meaning “envy” or related to the Latin word for “blue.”
  • Ludovica – The feminine form of Ludovico, an Italian name meaning “famous in war.”
  • Liliana – A variation of Lillian, possibly derived from Elizabeth, meaning “God is my oath.”
  • Loredana – Possibly created by French author George Sand for a novel, it may mean “laurel grove.”
  • Luigi – The Italian form of Louis, meaning “renowned warrior.”
  • Lino – Short form of names ending in “-lino,” it’s also associated with the Greek word for flax.
  • Loris – Possibly a variant of Laurence or an Italian form of Laurus, meaning “laurel.”
  • Luciano – An Italian and Spanish name meaning “light” or “illumination.”
  • Lucio – Another name derived from Latin meaning “light” or “born at dawn.”
  • Livio – An Italian name possibly derived from the Latin “lividus,” meaning “blue” or “envious.”
  • Letizia – Italian for “joy” or “happiness,” derived from Latin “laetitia.”
  • Lisa – A short form of Elisabetta, the Italian version of Elizabeth, meaning “God is my oath.”
  • Lina – A diminutive of names ending in “-lina,” it can also mean “tender” or “delicate.”
  • Lia – Italian variant of Leah, possibly meaning “weary” or “cow.”
  • Lorena – A name that might be derived from the region of Lorraine in France.
  • Linda – Means “beautiful” in Spanish and Portuguese, and may also be derived from Germanic lind, meaning “soft, tender.”
  • Loretta – A diminutive form of Laura, meaning “laurel.”
  • Luciana – Feminine form of Luciano, meaning “light” or “born at dawn.”
  • Lamberto – An Italian name meaning “bright land,” derived from Germanic elements.
  • Lanfranco – An Italian name composed of the elements “land” and “frank,” meaning “free land.”
  • Lara – Possibly related to the name Laura, or from the Latin “Larus,” referring to a seagull.
  • Leandro – Meaning “lion-man” in Greek, associated with the myth of Hero and Leander.
  • Lelia – Possibly a variant of Lelia, an ancient Roman name.
  • Lelio – An Italian name that could be derived from the Greek “helios,” meaning “sun.”
  • Leon – Italian and Spanish for “lion,” symbolizing strength and courage.
  • Leonora – An Italian variation of Eleanor, possibly meaning “light” or “compassion.”
  • Leopoldo – An Italian name meaning “bold people,” from Germanic elements.
  • Liana – A name that may be derived from the liana plant, symbolizing growth and entwinement.
  • Liborio – Possibly derived from the Latin “liber,” meaning “free.”
  • Lidia – Italian form of Lydia, a region in Asia Minor or possibly meaning “beautiful one.”
  • Lilla – Italian for “lilac,” a flower symbolizing first love in the language of flowers.
  • Lisandro – A variant of Lysander, meaning “liberator” in Greek.
  • Liviana – An Italian name possibly related to Livius, an ancient Roman family name.
  • Loide – Rare Italian name, possibly a variant of Lloyd, meaning “grey” in Welsh.
  • Lorella – A diminutive form of Lora or a variant of Lorelei, referring to a siren of German legend.
  • Lorenza – Feminine form of Lorenzo, meaning “from Laurentum” or “laurel-crowned.”
  • Ludovico – An Italian variant of Ludwig, meaning “famous warrior.”
  • Luisa – The Italian form of Louise, meaning “renowned warrior.”
  • Luna – Meaning “moon” in Italian, a name that reflects the celestial body.
  • Lucrezia – An Italian name possibly derived from the Latin “lucrum,” meaning “profit” or “wealth.”

M

  • Marco – A classic Italian name derived from the Latin “Marcus,” which may have connections to the Roman god Mars.
  • Maria – The Italian form of “Mary,” widely used due to its Christian biblical significance.
  • Matteo – The Italian version of “Matthew,” meaning “gift of God” in Hebrew.
  • Martina – A feminine form of Martin, often associated with the Latin “Martinus,” which refers to the Roman god Mars.
  • Maurizio – Italian form of “Maurice,” originally from the Latin “Mauritius,” meaning “dark-skinned” or “Moorish.”
  • Michele – The Italian variant of “Michael,” meaning “who is like God?” in Hebrew.
  • Monica – A name of uncertain origin, possibly from North African or Phoenician roots, made famous by St. Monica, the mother of St. Augustine.
  • Massimo – Derived from the Latin “Maximus,” meaning “greatest.”
  • Mario – The Italian version of “Marius,” possibly related to the Roman god Mars or the Latin “mare” meaning “sea.”
  • Michela – Feminine form of Michele, the Italian version of “Michaela.”
  • Marzia – Italian form of “Marcia,” feminine of “Marcius,” a Roman family name related to Mars, the god of war.
  • Mauro – From the Latin “Maurus,” meaning “Moorish” or “dark-skinned.”
  • Margherita – Italian for “daisy” and also associated with the name “Margaret,” which means “pearl.”
  • Marisa – A combination of Maria and Luisa, or a variant of Marissa.
  • Mirko – A Slavic name used in Italy, likely meaning “peaceful” or “worldly.”
  • Manuela – Feminine form of “Manuel,” meaning “God is with us” in Hebrew.
  • Marcello – Italian form of “Marcellus,” a diminutive of “Marcus” related to the god Mars.
  • Marta – The Italian version of “Martha,” which may derive from Aramaic meaning “lady” or “mistress.”
  • Mirella – A diminutive form of “Mira,” which can be derived from the Slavic element mir meaning “peace” or “world.”
  • Moreno – Means “dark-haired” in Italian, from the Latin word “Maurus.”
  • Marina – From the Latin “marinus,” meaning “of the sea.”
  • Massimiliano – An elaborate form of Massimo, meaning “greatest” in Italian.
  • Mara – Possibly from the Hebrew for “bitter” or a short form of “Tamara,” meaning “palm tree.”
  • Miriam – The original Hebrew form of “Mary,” with uncertain meaning, possibly “wished-for child.”
  • Melania – Derived from the Greek “melaina,” meaning “black, dark.”
  • Marcella – Feminine form of Marcello, meaning “young warrior” or “little Marcus.”
  • Mariano – Derived from “Marius,” and also related to the Virgin Mary.
  • Milena – Slavic origin meaning “gracious” or “pleasant.”
  • Marianna – A blend of Maria and Anna, meaning “gracious” or “full of grace.”
  • Maicol – Italian phonetic variant of “Michael.”
  • Morena – Feminine form of Moreno, meaning “dark-haired.”
  • Maurizia – Feminine form of Maurizio, meaning “dark-skinned” or “Moorish.”
  • Marilena – A combination of Maria and Elena, meaning “shining light” or “torch.”
  • Mirco – Variant of Mirko, a Slavic name meaning “peaceful” or “worldly.”
  • Mariangela – A compound of Maria and Angela, meaning “Angel” or “messenger of God.”
  • Marilù – A diminutive form, combining Maria with Lu, possibly from “Lucia” meaning “light.”
  • Manfredi – Of Germanic origin, meaning “man of peace.”
  • Miriana – Variant of Miriam, meaning “wished-for child.”
  • Marica – Possibly related to the Latin “mare,” meaning “sea,” or a variant of Marissa.
  • Miran – A name of Slavic origin, meaning “peaceful.”
  • Marilisa – A compound of Maria and Lisa, possibly meaning “God is my oath.”
  • Mattia – The Italian form of “Matthias,” meaning “gift of God.”
  • Maura – Feminine form of “Maurus,” meaning “Moorish” or “dark-skinned.”
  • Mino – Short form or nickname for names ending in “-mino” or “-menico,” like “Domenico.”
  • Mattea – Feminine form of Matteo, meaning “gift of God.”
  • Melina – Possibly derived from Greek “melas,” meaning “honey” or “sweet.”

N

  • Nadia – A name of Slavic origin meaning “hope.”
  • Nando – Often a short form of Ferdinando, the Italian version of Ferdinand, meaning “bold voyager.”
  • Natale – Means “Christmas” in Italian and is often given to boys born on or around the holiday.
  • Natalia – A feminine form of Natale, meaning “Christmas Day.”
  • Natalina – A diminutive form of Natalia, giving it a more endearing quality.
  • Natacha – A variant of Natasha, which is the Russian diminutive of Natalia.
  • Natanaele – The Italian form of Nathanael, meaning “God has given.”
  • Nazario – Derived from Nazarius, a saint’s name of Latin origin meaning “from Nazareth.”
  • Nazarena – A feminine form of Nazario, often used to honor the Christian heritage.
  • Nazzareno – Another variation of Nazario, with a more emphatic Italian ending.
  • Nazzaro – A less common variant of Nazario, with a regional Italian flavor.
  • Nebbia – Means “fog” in Italian, a rare and evocative name.
  • Neda – A name of Slavic origin possibly meaning “born on Sunday” or “voice.”
  • Nedda – A diminutive form of Bernadetta or a variation of Neda in Italian.
  • Nedo – A short and rare Italian name, possibly a diminutive of names like Bernardo.
  • Nelia – Possibly a shortened form of Cornelia or a variant of Nella in Italian.
  • Nella – A diminutive form of names like Antonella or Petronella in Italian.
  • Nello – A masculine diminutive form of names like Marcello or Lionello.
  • Nemo – Latin for “nobody,” but also known as the captain in Jules Verne’s “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.”
  • Nereo – An Italian name derived from the Greek mythological figure Nereus, who was a sea god.
  • Nerina – A feminine diminutive form of Nero, meaning “water” and also related to the mythological Nereids.
  • Nerio – An Italian masculine name, possibly related to Nerio, the ancient war goddess’s consort.
  • Neri – Originally a surname, possibly derived from the Italian for “black” or “dark.”
  • Nerino – A diminutive form of Neri, adding a tender touch to the original name.
  • Neron – A variant of Nero, which means “strong, vigorous” in Latin.
  • Nestore – The Italian form of Nestor, meaning “homecoming” in Greek.
  • Nevio – Possibly derived from the Latin “naevus,” meaning “mole” or “birthmark.”
  • Nicandro – Composed of Greek elements meaning “victory” and “man.”
  • Niccolò – The Italian form of Nicholas, meaning “victory of the people.”
  • Niceforo – Derived from Greek elements meaning “carrier of victory.”
  • Nicla – A short form of names like Nicola or Nicoletta in Italian.
  • Nico – A short form of Nicholas or Niccolò, often used as an independent name.
  • Nicola – The Italian form of Nicholas, used for both males and females.
  • Nicoletta – A feminine diminutive form of Nicola, adding a sweet touch.
  • Nicolina – Another feminine form of Nicola, with a more traditional Italian ending.
  • Nicolò – A variant spelling of Niccolò, maintaining the same pronunciation.
  • Nigella – A feminine form of Nigel, which is of Latin origin meaning “dark” or “black.”
  • Nilde – Possibly a short form of Brunilde, an Italian name of Germanic origin.
  • Nilla – A diminutive form of names like Petronilla in Italian.
  • Nilo – The Italian form of the Nile River, sometimes used as a name.
  • Nina – A name with multiple origins, in Italian it can be a diminutive of names like Antonina.
  • Ninetta – A diminutive form of Nina, adding an affectionate Italian ending.
  • Nino – A masculine diminutive form of names like Antonino or Giovanni.
  • Nives – Derived from the Latin word “nivis” meaning “snow,” often associated with the Virgin Mary in Italy.
  • Noè – The Italian form of Noah, meaning “rest” or “comfort.”
  • Noemi – The Italian form of Naomi, meaning “pleasantness.”
  • Norberto – The Italian form of Norbert, meaning “north” and “bright.”
  • Norma – Possibly derived from the Latin word “norma” meaning “rule” or “standard,” but also known for Bellini’s opera.

O

  • Ottavia – A feminine form of Octavius, often associated with nobility and the number eight.
  • Orlando – The Italian form of Roland, known for the legendary figure in the epic poem “Orlando Furioso.”
  • Orsino – Derived from “orso,” meaning bear, and also the name of a character in Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night.”
  • Olimpia – The Italian form of Olympia, evoking the grandeur of the ancient Olympic Games.
  • Osvaldo – An Italian variation of Oswald, meaning “god of the forest” or “god ruler.”
  • Ornella – Meaning “flowering ash tree,” it is a name created by the Italian poet Gabriele D’Annunzio.
  • Oreste – Originating from Greek mythology, Oreste is the Italian form of Orestes, who was a figure in several Greek tragedies.
  • Ottavio – Meaning “eighth” in Italian, it is often given to the eighth child or born in the eighth month.
  • Olga – A name of Scandinavian origin, popular in Italy, meaning “blessed” or “holy.”
  • Orfeo – The Italian version of Orpheus, the legendary musician and poet of Greek mythology.
  • Oriana – Meaning “dawn” in Italian, and also associated with a medieval literary character.
  • Octavia – The feminine form of Octavius, a name with Latin origins meaning “eighth.”
  • Orazio – The Italian form of Horace, an ancient Roman poet known for his odes and satires.
  • Odilia – Possibly of Germanic origin with ties to the word for “wealth” or “fortune.”
  • Ovidio – Derived from the Roman poet Ovid, known for his work “Metamorphoses.”
  • Orabella – A unique Italian name that combines elements meaning “beautiful gold.”
  • Orsola – The Italian version of Ursula, meaning “little female bear.”
  • Onofrio – Italian form of Humphrey, meaning “peaceful warrior.”
  • Oliviero – The Italian form of Oliver, possibly meaning “ancestor’s descendant” or “olive tree.”
  • Orfilia – A rare Italian name possibly derived from the Germanic elements meaning “heritage” and “strength.”
  • Ottone – Italian form of Otto, meaning “wealth” or “fortune.”
  • Ortensia – The Italian form of Hortensia, a name derived from the Latin word for “garden.”
  • Olimpio – A variation of Olimpia, related to Mount Olympus and the home of the Greek gods.
  • Orso – Italian for “bear,” it’s a strong and straightforward name.
  • Orietta – A diminutive form of Oriana, meaning “little dawn.”
  • Ombretta – A diminutive form of ombra, meaning “shadow,” often used affectionately.
  • Ondina – Derived from the word for “wave” in Italian, often associated with water spirits.
  • Orazia – Feminine form of Orazio, a name with connections to the ancient Roman poet Horace.
  • Orio – Possibly derived from the Latin “aurum” for “gold” or a variation of the name Uriah.
  • Ottorino – A diminutive form of Ottone, meaning “little Otto” or “little wealthy one.”
  • Omberto – A rare Italian name that could be a variant of Umberto, meaning “renowned warrior.”
  • Oresteia – A name inspired by the ancient Greek trilogy by Aeschylus, focusing on the story of Orestes.
  • Ortensio – A variant of Ortensia, referring to someone who works in or loves gardens.
  • Oscar – Of English and Irish origin, adopted in Italy, meaning “deer lover” or “god spear.”
  • Otello – The Italian form of Othello, made famous by Shakespeare’s tragedy.
  • Onorio – Italian form of Honorius, meaning “man of honor” or “honored one.”
  • Orlanda – Feminine form of Orlando, evoking the chivalric hero from “Orlando Furioso.”
  • Oronzo – An Italian name possibly derived from the Latin “Laurentius,” meaning “from Laurentum.”
  • Olinda – A name of uncertain origin, possibly related to the Greek word for “holy.”
  • Otavia – A variant of Ottavia, meaning “eighth” and associated with noble birth.
  • Orsina – Feminine form of Orsino, meaning “little female bear.”
  • Osvalda – The feminine form of Osvaldo, meaning “god ruler” or “god of the forest.”
  • Otelia – A variation of Othelia, possibly meaning “riches” or “prosperity.”
  • Othello – The Italian form of Otho, though more commonly associated with Shakespeare’s Moorish general.
  • Otranto – Named after the Italian coastal city, it’s a rare given name with historic and geographic connotations.
  • Ozanna – An Italian form of Hosanna, meaning “save now” or “please save.”

P

  • Paolo – An Italian form of Paul, meaning “small” or “humble”.
  • Paola – The feminine version of Paolo, also meaning “small” or “humble”.
  • Pasquale – Derived from the Latin “Paschalis,” which relates to Easter, thus “born on Easter” or “relating to Easter”.
  • Patrizia – The female form of Patrizio, meaning “noble” or “patrician”.
  • Patrizio – An Italian name meaning “noble” or “patrician”.
  • Piera – The feminine form of Piero, meaning “rock” or “stone”.
  • Piero – Italian variation of Peter, meaning “rock” or “stone”.
  • Pietro – The Italian form of Peter, which means “rock” or “stone”.
  • Pina – A diminutive of Giuseppina, the Italian form of Josephine, meaning “God will add” or “God shall add”.
  • Pio – Means “pious” or “devout” in Italian.
  • Pippa – A diminutive of names like Filippa, the Italian female form of Philip, meaning “lover of horses”.
  • Pippo – An affectionate Italian diminutive of Giuseppe, which is the Italian form of Joseph, meaning “He will add”.
  • Placido – An Italian name meaning “calm” or “placid”.
  • Primo – Means “first” in Italian, often given to the first-born child.
  • Priscilla – A Latin name meaning “ancient” or “venerable”, which has been adopted into Italian.
  • Prospero – The masculine form meaning “prosperous” or “fortunate”.
  • Pompeo – Derived from the Roman family name Pompeius, possibly meaning “five” or “display”.
  • Palmira – Refers to the city of Palmyra in Syria, meaning “city of palm trees”.
  • Palmiro – The masculine form of Palmira, also meaning “city of palm trees”.
  • Paterno – Means “fatherly” or “paternal” in Italian.
  • Pellegrino – Signifies a “pilgrim” or “traveler”.
  • Perlita – A diminutive form meaning “little pearl” in Italian.
  • Pierina – A diminutive form of Piera, meaning “little rock” or “stone”.
  • Pierluigi – A compound name combining Piero (Peter) and Luigi (Louis), meaning “rock” and “famous warrior”.
  • Pierpaolo – A compound name combining Piero (Peter) and Paolo (Paul), meaning “rock” and “small”.
  • Pietra – The feminine form of Pietro, meaning “rock” or “stone”.
  • Pietrina – A diminutive form of Pietra, meaning “little rock” or “stone”.
  • Plinio – Possibly derived from the Roman family name Plinius, the meaning is uncertain but may be related to “plenum” meaning “full”.
  • Porfirio – From the Greek Porphyrios, meaning “purple dye” or “purple-clad”.
  • Prospera – The feminine form of Prospero, meaning “prosperous” or “fortunate”.
  • Protasio – Derived from the Greek Protasios, meaning “first” or “foremost”.
  • Prudenzia – The feminine form of Prudentius, meaning “prudence” or “good judgment”.
  • Pulcheria – Derived from the Latin “pulcher”, meaning “beautiful”.
  • Pamina – Possibly a variant of the name Pamona, the Roman goddess of fruit, or a creation from the opera “The Magic Flute”.
  • Pasqualina – A feminine diminutive of Pasquale, meaning “related to Easter”.
  • Pia – Means “pious” or “devout” in Italian.
  • Pierette – A French diminutive form of Piera, used in Italian, meaning “little rock”.
  • Pierina – A diminutive of Piera, meaning “little rock” or “stone”.
  • Poldo – An Italian diminutive, possibly of Leopoldo, meaning “bold people”.

Q

  • Quarto – Derived from Latin, meaning “fourth,” often given to the fourth child.
  • Quinto – An Italian name meaning “fifth,” commonly bestowed upon the fifth son.
  • Quirino – An ancient Roman name possibly meaning “spear” or related to the Sabine word for “community.”
  • Quirina – The feminine form of Quirino, this name shares its origin with the Roman god of war, Quirinus.
  • Quinzio – A variant of Quinzio, possibly derived from the Roman family name Quinctius, meaning “fifth.”
  • Quinzia – The feminine version of Quinzio, meaning “fifth” and may refer to the fifth-born daughter.
  • Quirico – An Italian name that may be derived from Cyriacus, meaning “of the Lord Cyricus.”
  • Quirica – A feminine form of Quirico, with the same potential derivation from Cyriacus.
  • Quilio – Possibly a variant of the name Quirilio, which could be related to the Roman family name Curilius.
  • Quilia – The feminine form of Quilio, sharing the same possible origins with a Roman family name.
  • Quartilla – A diminutive form of Quarta, meaning “little fourth,” often used affectionately.
  • Quercia – Meaning “oak” in Italian, this name could symbolize strength and endurance.
  • Quercus – The botanical name for the oak tree genus, which could be used metaphorically as a name.
  • Quasimodo – From the Latin phrase “quasi modo,” meaning “as if in manner,” known from Victor Hugo’s character in “The Hunchback of Notre-Dame.”
  • Quiria – A variation of Quirina, again related to the Roman god Quirinus.
  • Quiriano – A masculine form of Quirina, potentially denoting a connection to the god Quirinus.
  • Querina – A variation of Quirina, with the same possible connection to Roman mythology.
  • Querino – The masculine counterpart to Querina, sharing similar origins.
  • Quiliano – This name’s origin is less clear, but it may be related to the Roman family name Aelius.
  • Quilico – Possibly a variant of Quilicus, which might be related to the Roman family name Cilnius.
  • Quintiliano – Derived from the Latin Quintilianus, meaning “belonging to Quintilius,” which refers to the fifth.
  • Quintiliana – The feminine form of Quintiliano, with the same derivation from the Roman name Quintilius.
  • Quintino – A name meaning “fifth,” often used for the fifth male child in a family.
  • Quintina – The female equivalent of Quintino, similarly meaning “fifth.”
  • Quinziano – Possibly a variant of Quinzio, meaning “fifth,” and related to the Roman family name Quinctius.
  • Quintus – A Roman name meaning “fifth,” historically given to the fifth son in a family.
  • Quiriele – A rare Italian name with unclear origins, which could be a variant of the name Cyriacus.
  • Quirilla – A diminutive or affectionate form of Quirina, with a connection to Roman mythology.

R

  • Rachele – An Italian variant of the Hebrew name Rachel, meaning “ewe” or “female sheep.”
  • Raffaele – Derived from the Hebrew name Raphael, meaning “God has healed.”
  • Raffaella – The feminine form of Raffaele, carrying the same meaning of divine healing.
  • Raimondo – Italian form of Raymond, meaning “wise protector.”
  • Raimundo – Another variant of Raymond, common in Italian and Spanish-speaking countries.
  • Raimund – A Germanic origin name similar to Raimondo, emphasizing the protection aspect.
  • Raimundas – A Lithuanian variation of the name Raymond.
  • Raimundi – An old form, less commonly used, but related to the name Raymond.
  • Rainaldo – An Italian name meaning “wise ruler,” a variant of Reynold.
  • Rainald – Another form of Reynold, with a Germanic origin meaning “ruler’s advisor.”
  • Rainard – A name of Germanic origin, similar to Reynard, meaning “strong judgment.”
  • Rainardo – An Italian variant of Reynard, which means “strong or brave counsel.”
  • Rainart – A Germanic name also related to Reynard, with a focus on wise counsel.
  • Rainer – A name of German origin meaning “counsel” or “advice.”
  • Rainerio – An Italian variation of the name Rainer, with a similar meaning.
  • Rainerius – A Latinized version of Rainer, often used in historical contexts.
  • Rainier – A French and English variant of Rainer, also the name of a mountain in Washington state.
  • Rainieri – An Italian form of Rainier, meaning “wise army.”
  • Rainiero – Another Italian variation of Rainier, with a military connotation.
  • Raimo – A Finnish form of Raymond, meaning “advice” or “protector.”
  • Raisa – A name of Hebrew origin meaning “rose,” also found in Slavic countries.
  • Raito – An uncommon name, possibly a variant of the Italian Raffaello or influenced by Japanese culture.
  • Rajmond – A Hungarian form of Raymond, meaning “wise protector.”
  • Rajnald – Likely a variant of Ronald, meaning “ruler’s counselor” in Old Norse.
  • Rajnhold – A unique form, possibly related to the name Reinhold, meaning “wise protector.”
  • Ralf – A variant of Ralph, of Old Norse origin, meaning “wolf counsel.”
  • Ralfo – An Italian adaptation of the name Ralph.
  • Ralph – An English name derived from the Old Norse Raðulfr, meaning “wolf counsel.”
  • Ramiro – A Spanish and Portuguese name meaning “judicious” or “wise.”
  • Ramond – A variant of Raymond, emphasizing the wisdom and protection aspects.
  • Ramondo – An Italianized form of Ramond.
  • Ramon – A Spanish form of Raymond, with the same meaning.
  • Ramone – A variant of Ramon, often used as a surname.
  • Ramón – The accented Spanish version of Ramon.
  • Ramona – The feminine form of Ramon, meaning “wise protector” in Spanish.
  • Ramy – A name of uncertain origin, possibly a short form of Ramiro or an independent name.
  • Ranaldo – An Italian variant of Reynold, meaning “ruler’s advisor.”
  • Raniero – An Italian name meaning “warrior” or “army.”
  • Ranieri – Another Italian form of Rainier, meaning “wise army.”
  • Raphaël – A French spelling of Raphael, meaning “God has healed.”
  • Raphael – A name of Hebrew origin meaning “God has healed,” also known for the Renaissance artist.
  • Raphaëlle – The feminine form of Raphael, carrying the same divine healing meaning.
  • Raquel – A Spanish form of Rachel, meaning “ewe” or “female sheep.”
  • Raul – An Italian and Spanish version of Ralph, meaning “wolf counsel” or “brave counsel.”

S

  • Sabina – Derived from the Latin word “sabinus,” indicating a person from the Sabine tribe.
  • Sabrina – This name is of Celtic origin, linked to the River Severn in the UK, known as “Sabrina” in legend.
  • Salvatore – Italian for “savior,” reflecting a religious or protective characteristic.
  • Samanta – The Italian version of Samantha, possibly derived from the Aramaic name meaning “listener.”
  • Samuele – Italian form of Samuel, a name of Hebrew origin meaning “God has heard.”
  • Sandra – A diminutive of Alessandra, the Italian form of Alexandra meaning “defender of mankind.”
  • Sandro – A diminutive of Alessandro, the Italian form of Alexander meaning “defender of mankind.”
  • Santina – A feminine diminutive of Santo, meaning “little saint” in Italian.
  • Santo – Directly translates to “saint” in Italian, often used to convey holiness or devotion.
  • Sara – Italian for Sarah, a name of Hebrew origin meaning “princess” or “noblewoman.”
  • Saverio – Italian form of Xavier, originating from the Basque place name Etxeberria, meaning “the new house.”
  • Savina – Feminine form of Savino, possibly related to the Sabines, an ancient Italian tribe.
  • Sebastiano – Italian for Sebastian, derived from the Greek name Sebastianos, meaning “from Sebastia.”
  • Selena – Of Greek origin, meaning “moon,” reflecting the celestial body’s beauty and radiance.
  • Serena – From a Latin word meaning “clear, tranquil, serene.”
  • Sergio – Of Latin origin, possibly derived from “Sergius,” a Roman family name.
  • Severino – An Italian name meaning “stern,” derived from the Latin name Severinus.
  • Silvana – Feminine form of Silvanus, from Latin origin meaning “woodland” or “forest.”
  • Silvestro – Italian form of Sylvester, from Latin origin meaning “wild” or “of the forest.”
  • Silvia – Feminine form of Silvius, from Latin origin meaning “wood” or “forest.”
  • Simona – Feminine form of Simone, the Italian version of Simon, meaning “he has heard.”
  • Simone – Italian form of Simon, derived from the Hebrew name Shim’on, meaning “he has heard.”
  • Sofia – Of Greek origin, meaning “wisdom,” a classic and popular name choice.
  • Sonia – An Italian variant of Sonya, itself a diminutive of Sophia, meaning “wisdom.”
  • Stefania – Feminine form of Stefano, the Italian version of Stephanie, from the Greek for “crown” or “garland.”
  • Stefano – Italian form of Stephen, from the Greek name Stephanos, meaning “crown” or “wreath.”
  • Stella – Directly translates to “star” in Italian, denoting celestial beauty.
  • Susanna – From Hebrew origin, meaning “lily,” a name that signifies purity and beauty.
  • Sabino – Related to the Sabines, an ancient Italian tribe, and means “Sabine.”
  • Sante – Italian variant of the name Santo, meaning “saints.”
  • Saul – Of Hebrew origin, meaning “asked for, prayed for,” and is the name of the first king of Israel in the Old Testament.
  • Serafina – Feminine form of Serafino, meaning “fiery ones,” associated with the highest order of angels, the seraphim.
  • Serafino – Italian form of Seraphinus, meaning “fiery,” in reference to the seraphim in Christian angelology.
  • Severina – Feminine form of Severino, meaning “stern” in Latin.
  • Silvano – Derived from the Latin “Silvanus,” meaning “of the forest,” the Roman god of forests.
  • Silvio – From the Latin “silva,” meaning “wood” or “forest,” a name with pastoral connotations.
  • Simonetta – A diminutive form of Simona, adding a touch of endearment to the original name.
  • Siro – Of Latin origin, meaning “from Syria,” a name that indicates geographical heritage.
  • Sveva – Of Germanic origin, meaning “Swabian,” referring to a people from the region of Swabia.
  • Saveria – Feminine form of Saverio, the Italian version of Xavier, meaning “new house” or “bright.”
  • Severo – Italian form of Severus, meaning “stern” or “serious” in Latin.
  • Sidonia – Of Latin origin, possibly meaning “from Sidon,” a city in ancient Phoenicia.
  • Siria – Italian for “Syria,” the name of the Middle Eastern country, possibly meaning “sun-bright, glowing.”

T

  • Taddeo – This name is the Italian form of Thaddeus, which means “heart” or “courageous.”
  • Tamara – Derived from the biblical name Tamar, it means “date palm” in Hebrew.
  • Tazio – An Italian variant of the ancient Roman family name Tatius.
  • Tea – A short form of names like Dorotea or Teodora in Italian, meaning “gift of God.”
  • Tecla – Italian form of Thekla, which means “glory of God” in Greek.
  • Telsche – A rare name, possibly a variation of Thekla or a diminutive of a Germanic name.
  • Teodora – The feminine form of Teodoro, meaning “gift of God.”
  • Teodoro – Italian version of Theodore, meaning “gift of God.”
  • Teodosio – The Italian form of Theodosius, meaning “giving to God.”
  • Terenzio – Italian form of Terence, a Roman family name possibly meaning “tender” or “gracious.”
  • Teresa – Italian and Spanish form of Theresa, its meaning is uncertain, possibly “harvester.”
  • Tiberio – Derived from the name of the Tiber River in Italy, it was also the name of a Roman emperor.
  • Tino – A diminutive of names ending in “-tino,” it can also stand alone as a given name.
  • Tito – Italian form of Titus, a Roman family name possibly meaning “title of honor.”
  • Tobia – Italian form of Tobias, meaning “God is good” in Hebrew.
  • Tomaso – Italian variant of Thomas, meaning “twin” in Aramaic.
  • Tommaso – Another Italian variant of Thomas, also meaning “twin.”
  • Tonia – A feminine diminutive form of Antonio, meaning “priceless one.”
  • Tonio – A masculine diminutive form of Antonio, again meaning “priceless one.”
  • Tore – An Italian short form of Salvatore or a variant of Thor, the Norse god of thunder.
  • Tullia – Feminine form of Tullius, a Roman family name of unknown meaning.
  • Tullio – Italian form of Tullius, a Roman family name that might be related to the Latin word for “to raise.”
  • Turi – A diminutive of Salvatore or a form of the Germanic name Thor.
  • Taddei – A surname that is a variant of Taddeo, often used as a given name.
  • Tai – An Italian short form for names starting with “Tai” or a name from various other cultures.
  • Talita – Italian form of Talitha, meaning “little girl” in Aramaic, from a biblical story.
  • Tammaro – An Italian name possibly derived from the Germanic elements meaning “fame” and “protection.”
  • Tancredi – An old Italian name meaning “thought” and “counsel.”
  • Tarcisio – Italian form of Tarsicius, the name of a Christian martyr, meaning is uncertain.
  • Tarquinio – Italian form of Tarquinius, a Roman family name of Etruscan origin, possibly meaning “prince.”
  • Tarsilla – An Italian female name, possibly a variant of Tarsilia, the name of an early Christian saint.
  • Tarsisio – Another variant of Tarsicius, referring to the Christian martyr.
  • Taziana – A feminine form of Taziano, meaning “from Tazius,” a Roman family name.
  • Taziano – Italian form of Tatianus, derived from the Roman family name Tatius.
  • Telesforo – Italian form of Telesphorus, meaning “bringing fulfillment” or “bearing fruit.”
  • Temistocle – Italian form of Themistocles, an ancient Greek name meaning “glory of the law.”
  • Teseo – Italian form of Theseus, a hero in Greek mythology.
  • Tessia – Possibly a variant of Tessa, a short form of Theresa or an independent name.
  • Teun – A Dutch diminutive of Antonius, which is related to the name Anthony, meaning “priceless one.”
  • Thalia – From Greek mythology, Thalia is one of the nine Muses, representing comedy and idyllic poetry.
  • Thelma – A name of Greek origin meaning “will, volition.”
  • Theodora – Feminine form of Theodore, meaning “gift of God.”
  • Timoteo – Italian form of Timothy, meaning “honoring God.”
  • Tindaro – An Italian name that might be derived from Tyndareus, the name of a king in Greek mythology.
  • Tirone – Italian form of Tyrone, a name derived from a county in Ireland.
  • Tiziana – Feminine form of Tiziano, meaning “from Tizius,” a Roman family name.
  • Tiziano – Italian form of Titianus, a Roman family name, also known for the Renaissance painter Titian.
  • Tobiah – A variant of Tobias, meaning “God is good” in Hebrew.
  • Tommasina – A feminine diminutive form of Tommaso, meaning “little twin.”

U

  • Ubaldo: An Italian name of Germanic origin meaning “bold heart.”
  • Uberto: Italian form of Hubert, meaning “bright heart” or “bright spirit.”
  • Ugo: Italian variation of Hugo, which means “mind” or “intellect.”
  • Ulberto: A less common Italian name, possibly a variation of Uberto, meaning “bright heart.”
  • Ulderico: An old Germanic name meaning “powerful through his inheritance.”
  • Ulisse: The Italian form of Ulysses, derived from the Greek Odysseus, a hero from Homer’s epics.
  • Uliva: An Italian name that is a feminine form of Ulivo, meaning “olive” or “olive tree.”
  • Ulrico: Italian form of Ulrich, meaning “prosperity and power.”
  • Ulrika: A variant of Ulrica, the feminine form of Ulric, meaning “wolf power.”
  • Ultimo: Means “last” in Italian, often used for the youngest child in a family.
  • Umberta: Feminine form of Umberto, meaning “bright or famous.”
  • Umberto: Italian version of Humbert, meaning “renowned warrior.”
  • Ummarino: Possibly a variant of Marino, meaning “of the sea” in Italian.
  • Una: Means “one” or “together” in Italian, also a name of Latin origin meaning “the one.”
  • Undina: Derived from Latin “unda” meaning “wave,” used for a water spirit.
  • Uneide: Likely a variant of the name Eunice, which means “good victory” in Greek.
  • Unna: This name could be of Germanic origin, meaning “woman.”
  • Urbano: Italian form of Urban, meaning “from the city” or “civilized.”
  • Urdina: Possibly a variant of the name Urd, which is of Old Norse origin, meaning “fate.”
  • Uriel: A Hebrew name meaning “God is my light.”
  • Urio: A rare Italian name, possibly a variant of Uri or Uriah, which means “my light is Yahweh.”
  • Ursina: A feminine form of Ursus, meaning “bear” in Latin.
  • Ursino: Derived from the Latin “ursus,” meaning “bear,” akin to Orsino.
  • Ursula: Means “little bear,” derived from a diminutive Latin form of “ursa” which means “bear.”
  • Ustina: A feminine form of Justine, meaning “just” or “fair.”
  • Uxio: Galician form of Uxío, which may be a variant of Euxenio or Eugenio, meaning “well-born.”
  • Uzio: Possibly a variant of Uzzi, which is Hebrew for “my strength.”
  • Ubalda: Feminine form of Ubaldo, meaning “bold heart.”
  • Uberta: A feminine form of Uberto, meaning “bright heart.”
  • Uda: A short form of names beginning with “Ud,” possibly meaning “prosperity.”
  • Udelia: Possibly a variant of Odelia, meaning “wealthy” or “song.”
  • Udemaro: A rare Italian name, likely of Germanic origin, meaning “famous for his prudence.”
  • Udilia: Likely a variant of Odilia, which means “wealth” or “fortune.”
  • Udolfo: Italian form of Rudolf, meaning “famous wolf.”
  • Ufemia: Likely a variant of Euphemia, meaning “well-spoken.”
  • Uguccione: An Italian name, possibly a diminutive of Ugo, meaning “intellect.”
  • Ulderica: Feminine form of Ulderico, meaning “powerful through his inheritance.”
  • Ulderigo: Variant of Ulderico, meaning “powerful through his inheritance.”
  • Ulfo: Likely a short form or variant of a name like Ulfr, meaning “wolf.”
  • Uliana: Italian form of Juliana, meaning “youthful.”
  • Ulidia: Possibly a variant of Lydia, which means “from Lydia” in Greek.
  • Ulinda: A rare Italian name, possibly an invented combination of elements from other names.
  • Uliviero: Italian form of Oliver, possibly meaning “ancestor’s descendant.”
  • Ulva: Means “wolf” in Italian, from the Latin “lupus.”
  • Ulysses: Latin form of Odysseus, known for his role in the Trojan War and his long journey home.
  • Umana: An Italian name meaning “human” or “of the people.”
  • Umber: Likely a variant of Umberto, meaning “renowned warrior.”
  • Umbra: Means “shadow” in Italian, sometimes used poetically to refer to a ghost or shade.
  • Umero: Possibly a variant of Homero, which is the Spanish form of Homer, the Greek poet.

V

  • Valentina – A feminine form of Valentinus, this name means “strong, healthy.”
  • Valentino – The masculine version of Valentina, often associated with the famous Italian fashion designer Valentino Garavani.
  • Valeria – Derived from Latin, meaning “to be strong,” it’s the feminine form of Valerius.
  • Valerio – A strong-sounding name that means “valiant” or “strong.”
  • Vanda – Of Germanic origin, meaning “wanderer,” it’s less common in Italy but still used.
  • Vanessa – Invented by author Jonathan Swift, it’s of uncertain meaning and not traditionally Italian but used in Italy.
  • Vanni – A diminutive of Giovanni, which is the Italian form of John, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Vannuccio – A diminutive form of Vanni, adding an affectionate touch to the name.
  • Vanya – A Russian diminutive of Ivan, but used in Italy, it means “God is gracious.”
  • Varo – An Italian surname and given name that might be derived from a Latin word meaning “knock-kneed.”
  • Vasco – Possibly a variant of the Basque name Velasco, meaning “crow” in Basque, but used in Italy.
  • Vedia – An Italian name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to the Latin “videre” meaning “to see.”
  • Vedrana – Of Slavic origin meaning “clear, serene,” it’s not common in Italy but may be found.
  • Velia – An ancient Roman name possibly related to the Latin “velum,” meaning “veil” or “cover.”
  • Veneranda – Means “worthy of reverence” in Latin, a name with a venerable feel.
  • Venusta – From Latin origin meaning “beautiful,” “charming,” or “graceful.”
  • Vera – Meaning “truth” in Latin, it’s a simple yet profound name.
  • Verena – Of uncertain origin, it’s believed to mean “integrity” in Latin.
  • Veronica – Meaning “she who brings victory” or “true image,” it has a strong Christian background.
  • Vespasiano – An old Roman family name, possibly meaning “westerner” or derived from the name of the Roman emperor.
  • Vico – A short form of Ludovico or an Italian surname, it’s also an Italian place name.
  • Vieri – A variation of Piero or Pietro, it means “rock” or “stone.”
  • Vigo – An Italian name of uncertain meaning, possibly a variant of Diego or James.
  • Vilfredo – Italian form of Wilfred, meaning “desiring peace.”
  • Viliano – A rare Italian name, possibly a variant of Emiliano or a derivative of the Latin “villanus” meaning “farmhand.”
  • Vilma – A short form of Wilhelmina, meaning “will helmet” or “protection.”
  • Vincenzo – The Italian form of Vincent, meaning “to conquer” or “victorious.”
  • Viola – From the name of the flower, it means “violet” in Italian.
  • Violetta – The diminutive form of Viola, it’s also an opera title by Verdi.
  • Violeto – A rare or possibly misspelled variant of Violetto, an Italian diminutive of Viola.
  • Vipera – Means “viper” in Italian, an unusual and striking name.
  • Virgilio – Italian form of Virgil, a famous Roman poet, the name means “staff bearer.”
  • Virginia – The feminine form of Virginius, it’s a classic name meaning “maiden” or “virginal.”
  • Virna – A modern name, possibly a variant of Verna or Verena.
  • Viscardo – A rare Italian name, possibly derived from the Germanic element “visc” meaning “marsh.”
  • Vitaliano – Meaning “vital” or “of life,” it’s derived from the Latin “vitalis.”
  • Vito – Means “life” in Latin, a name associated with vitality and energy.
  • Vittoria – The Italian word for “victory,” it’s a feminine form of Vittorio.
  • Vittorio – An Italian form of Victor, meaning “conqueror” or “victor.”
  • Viviana – Feminine form of Vivianus, meaning “alive” or “full of life.”
  • Viviano – A masculine form of Viviana, it carries the same lively meaning.
  • Vladi – A diminutive of Vladimiro, the Italian form of Vladimir, meaning “ruler of the world.”
  • Volfango – Italian form of Wolfgang, meaning “wolf path.”
  • Volturno – From a Latin name, possibly related to a river and god in Roman mythology.
  • Vonda – Likely a variant of Wanda, it’s not a traditional Italian name but may be found in Italy.
  • Vulpiano – An Italian name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to “vulpes,” the Latin word for “fox.”
  • Venerando – The masculine form of Veneranda, meaning “to be revered or worshipped.”
  • Venerino – A diminutive of Venerando, it adds an affectionate nuance to the name.
  • Veniero – An Italian name possibly related to the Latin “venari,” meaning “to hunt.”

W

  • Walter – A Germanic name meaning “ruler of the army.”
  • Walther – Variant of Walter, also of Germanic origin with the same meaning.
  • Wanda – Of Polish origin, possibly meaning “a slender young tree” or “wanderer.”
  • Wendy – Invented for the novel “Peter Pan,” possibly derived from the Welsh name Gwendolen.
  • Wilfredo – A Spanish variant of Wilfred, meaning “desiring peace.”
  • Wilhelmina – Feminine form of Wilhelm, meaning “will helmet” or “protection.”
  • William – Of English origin, derived from the Germanic name Wilhelm, meaning “resolute protector.”
  • Wilma – Shortened form of Wilhelmina, also meaning “will helmet” or “protection.”
  • Wilson – Meaning “son of Will,” with Will being a diminutive of William.
  • Winifred – Of Welsh origin, meaning “blessed peacemaking” or “fair.”
  • Wolfango – Italian form of Wolfgang, meaning “wolf path” in German.
  • Wally – Diminutive of Walter or Wallace, meaning “foreigner” or “stranger.”
  • Waldo – Originally a short form of Germanic names containing the element “wald” meaning “rule.”
  • Walfredo – Italian variant of Wilfred, meaning “desiring peace.”
  • Waltrude – Germanic name, possibly meaning “ruler of the army.”
  • Warner – Derived from a Germanic name meaning “army guard.”
  • Warren – From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning “enclosed” in Old English.
  • Warwick – From an English surname and place name meaning “dairy farm” in Old English.
  • Washington – Originally an English surname meaning “town belonging to Wassa’s people.”
  • Webster – An occupational surname for a weaver, from Old English “webbestre.”
  • Wendel – Germanic name meaning “to travel” or “to wander.”
  • Werner – Germanic name meaning “warrior” or “defending army.”
  • Wes – Short for Wesley, meaning “western meadow.”
  • Wesley – From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning “west meadow” in Old English.
  • Westley – Variation of Wesley, also meaning “west meadow.”
  • Whitney – From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning “white island” in Old English.
  • Wilbert – Germanic name meaning “bright will.”
  • Wilbur – Perhaps from a surname which was derived from the Middle English wildebor meaning “wild boar.”
  • Wilfred – English name derived from the Old English Wilfrith, meaning “desires peace.”
  • Wilhelm – Germanic name composed of the elements “wil” meaning “will, desire” and “helm” meaning “helmet, protection.”
  • Wilkie – Diminutive of William, meaning “resolute protector.”
  • Will – Short form of William, meaning “resolute protector.”
  • Willem – Dutch variant of William, meaning “resolute protector.”
  • Willis – Patronymic surname meaning “son of Will.”
  • Willy – Diminutive of William, meaning “resolute protector.”
  • Wilmer – Germanic name meaning “famous desire.”
  • Windsor – From an English surname which was from the name of the city of Windsor, which was originally Old English Windlesora “riverbank with a windlass.”
  • Winfield – English surname derived from a place name meaning “friend’s field.”
  • Winfred – Variant of Winifred, meaning “blessed peacemaking” or “fair.”
  • Winnie – Diminutive of Winifred, meaning “blessed peacemaking” or “fair.”
  • Winslow – From an English surname derived from a place name meaning “hill of victory.”
  • Winston – From an English surname derived from a place name meaning “Wine’s town.”
  • Winter – Originally a surname for someone who had a wintry personality or who had been born in the winter.
  • Winton – From an English surname which was derived from various place names meaning “town belonging to WINE” in Old English.
  • Witold – Polish form of a Lithuanian name meaning “ruler of the forest.”
  • Woodrow – From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning “row of houses by a wood” in Old English.
  • Woody – Diminutive of Woodrow or a descriptive name for someone who lives near a wood.
  • Wyatt – From an English surname which was derived from the medieval given name Wyot, itself from the Old English name Wigheard, meaning “war brave.”
  • Wyman – From an English surname meaning “warrior” or “battle strong.”
  • Wynne – From a Welsh surname which was derived from the given name Wyn, meaning “fair” or “white.”

X

  • Xandra – A modern, feminine form of Alexander, meaning “defender of mankind.”
  • Xanti – A Basque diminutive of Xabier, which is the Basque form of Xavier, meaning “new house” or “bright.”
  • Xaverio – The Italian form of Xavier, referring to the Catholic saint and meaning “new house.”
  • Xenia – A name of Greek origin meaning “hospitality.”
  • Xeno – Derived from the Greek word “xenos” meaning “foreign” or “strange.”
  • Xenon – Named after the noble gas, Xenon is a modern name with a scientific edge.
  • Xerse – An Italian variant of Xerxes, the name of a Persian king, meaning “ruling over heroes.”
  • Xhuliano – An Albanian form of Julian, meaning “youthful” or “downy-bearded.”
  • Ximena – A Spanish name meaning “hearkening” or “listener,” the feminine form of Ximeno.
  • Xiomara – A Spanish name possibly meaning “battle-ready.”
  • Xoana – The Galician form of Joanna, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Xylon – A name of Greek origin meaning “wood” or “forest.”
  • Xabier – The Basque form of Xavier, meaning “new house” or “bright.”
  • Xadrian – A modern name combining Xavier and Adrian, meaning “dark one from the new house.”
  • Xael – A modern, possibly invented name with no specific meaning.
  • Xandros – A short form of Alexander in Greek, meaning “defender of mankind.”
  • Xanthia – A name of Greek origin meaning “golden” or “yellow.”
  • Xanthippe – The name of Socrates’ wife, meaning “yellow horse” in Greek.
  • Xanthos – A name from Greek mythology meaning “golden” or “blonde.”
  • Xara – A variant of Zara or Sara, meaning “princess” or “lady.”
  • Xarles – A Basque form of Charles, meaning “free man.”
  • Xaver – A German and Catalan variant of Xavier, meaning “new house.”
  • Xaviera – The feminine form of Xavier, meaning “bright” or “splendid.”
  • Xavior – A modern variant of Xavier, with the same meaning “new house.”
  • Xen – A short and modern name, likely derived from Xenos, meaning “foreign” or “strange.”
  • Xenakis – A surname of Greek origin, likely referring to a descendant of someone named Xenos.
  • Xenio – A modern name, possibly derived from Xenos, meaning “hospitality.”
  • Xenocrates – An ancient Greek name meaning “power of hospitality.”
  • Xenophon – A name of Greek origin meaning “foreign voice.”
  • Xenos – A Greek name meaning “stranger” or “foreigner.”
  • Xerxes – The name of a Persian king, meaning “ruling over heroes.”
  • Xever – A variant of Xavier or Xeverus, meaning “new house.”
  • Xia – A Chinese name meaning “summer” or “grand, great.”
  • Xiang – A Chinese name meaning “fragrant” or “soar, fly.”
  • Ximeno – An old Spanish form of Simon, meaning “he has heard.”
  • Xiomar – A variant of Xiomara, possibly meaning “battle-ready.”
  • Xisto – A Portuguese form of Sixtus, meaning “polished.”
  • Xitlali – A Nahuatl name meaning “star.”
  • Xiu – A Chinese name meaning “elegant, beautiful.”
  • Xochitl – A Nahuatl name meaning “flower.”
  • Xun – A Chinese name meaning “fast” or “speedy.”
  • Xuxa – A diminutive of Susana used in Portuguese, meaning “lily.”
  • Xylander – A modern name with Greek roots, meaning “woodlander.”
  • Xylia – A name derived from Greek origin meaning “of the woods.”
  • Xylophon – A variant of Xylophone, referring to the musical instrument.
  • Xystus – A variant of Xystos, a Greek name meaning “polished” or “smooth.”
  • Xzavier – A modern variant of Xavier, meaning “new house.”

Y

  • Yago – A Spanish form of Jacob, meaning “supplanter.”
  • Yamila – Derived from Arabic roots, meaning “beautiful.”
  • Yara – Has multiple origins; in Brazilian mythology, Yara was a water goddess, and in Arabic, it means “small butterfly.”
  • Yari – A name of uncertain meaning, possibly a variant of the Slavic name Yuri.
  • Yasmina – A variant of Jasmine from Persian, meaning “jasmine flower.”
  • Yasmine – Another variant of Jasmine, which is associated with the fragrant flowering plant.
  • Yelena – The Russian form of Helen, meaning “bright, shining light.”
  • Ylenia – An Italian name possibly derived from the Greek Helene, meaning “torch” or “corposant.”
  • Yolanda – Of Greek origin, meaning “violet flower.”
  • Yosef – A variant of Joseph, of Hebrew origin meaning “He will add.”
  • Ysabel – A Spanish variant of Elizabeth, meaning “pledged to God.”
  • Yuri – A Russian and Ukrainian form of George, meaning “farmer” or “earth-worker.”
  • Yvonne – The feminine form of Yves, of French origin meaning “yew wood.”
  • Yamil – An Arabic name meaning “beautiful” or “handsome.”
  • Yan – A Chinese name meaning “swallow (the bird)” or “rock,” depending on the character used.
  • Yana – A Slavic name meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Yani – A name of Hebrew origin, a diminutive form of John meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Yannis – A Greek variant of John, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Yaritza – A name of uncertain origin and meaning, possibly a modern creation.
  • Yasmin – The original Persian form of Jasmine, meaning “jasmine flower.”
  • Yassine – An Arabic name, possibly a variant of Yasin, which is one of the chapters of the Quran.
  • Yeremia – A form of Jeremiah, of Hebrew origin meaning “exalted by God.”
  • Yesenia – A name possibly derived from the Jessenia palm tree, found in South America.
  • Ynez – A Spanish form of Agnes, meaning “chaste” or “holy.”
  • Ysadora – A name combining the elements of Isadora and Ysabel, meaning “gift of Isis” and “pledged to God,” respectively.
  • Yseult – A variant of Isolde, a name of uncertain origin, possibly meaning “ice ruler.”
  • Yul – A short form of Yulian, which is the Russian form of Julian, meaning “youthful.”
  • Yulia – A Russian form of Julia, meaning “youthful.”
  • Yuliana – A Slavic form of Juliana, meaning “youthful.”
  • Yuriko – A Japanese name meaning “lily child.”
  • Yusef – A variant of Yosef, meaning “He will add” in Hebrew.
  • Yves – A French name meaning “yew wood.”
  • Yvette – The feminine form of Yves, meaning “yew wood.”
  • Yael – A Hebrew name meaning “mountain goat.”
  • Yemina – A variant of Yamina, meaning “right hand” or “proper” in Arabic.

Z

  • Zaccaria – Italian form of Zechariah, a Hebrew name meaning “God has remembered.”
  • Zaira – Italian variation of the Arabic name Zahra, meaning “blooming flower.”
  • Zama – Possibly a place-inspired name, referring to an ancient city in North Africa.
  • Zanita – A name of uncertain origin, possibly a diminutive or variant of Giovanna, the Italian form of Jane.
  • Zara – A name of Arabic origin meaning “princess” or “to blossom.”
  • Zarina – An Italian take on a Persian name meaning “golden” or “queen.”
  • Zaverio – Italian form of Xavier, meaning “new house” or “bright.”
  • Zdenka – A Slavic name used in Italy, derived from Zdenko which means “of Sidon.”
  • Zefiro – Italian for Zephyr, the Greek god of the west wind.
  • Zelia – Possibly a variant of Celia, from the Latin caelum, meaning “heaven.”
  • Zelinda – An Italian name that may combine elements from names like Griselda and Rosalind.
  • Zenaida – Derived from the Greek name Zenais, which is related to Zeus, meaning “belonging to Zeus.”
  • Zenobio – Italian form of Zenobius, a Greek name meaning “life of Zeus.”
  • Zenone – Italian version of Zeno, from the Greek Zenon, derived from Zeus.
  • Zenzo – A variant of Lorenzo, the Italian form of Laurence, meaning “from Laurentum.”
  • Zeta – Possibly an Italian short form of names ending in -zetta, like Rosetta.
  • Zia – An Italian word meaning “aunt,” but also used as a name.
  • Ziano – A name of uncertain origin, it might be a variant of the Italian Gianni.
  • Zilla – Italian form of Silla, which might be related to Priscilla, meaning “ancient.”
  • Zina – A short form of names ending in -zina, such as Giuseppina.
  • Zino – Diminutive of names ending in -zino, often related to Vincenzo, meaning “conqueror.”
  • Zita – Means “little girl” in Tuscan Italian, also a saint’s name.
  • Zito – A variant of Zitto, meaning “silent” in Italian.
  • Zoe – From a Greek word meaning “life,” used in Italy as well.
  • Zora – Slavic origin meaning “dawn,” also found in Italian-speaking regions.
  • Zosimo – Italian form of Zosimus, a Greek name meaning “likely to survive.”
  • Zuan – Venetian form of Giovanni, the Italian version of John, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Zucchero – Meaning “sugar” in Italian, sometimes used as a nickname or stage name.
  • Zuleika – Of Arabic origin, possibly meaning “fair,” “brilliant,” or “lovely.”
  • Zuzanna – Italian form of Susannah, from the Hebrew for “lily.”
  • Zaccariah – A variant spelling of Zaccaria, meaning “God has remembered.”
  • Zaelia – A name of uncertain origin and meaning, possibly related to Zelia.
  • Zafira – Derived from the Arabic word for “victorious,” used in various cultures.
  • Zan – Short form for Giovanni in Venetian dialect, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Zanobi – Italian form of Zenobius, meaning “life of Zeus.”
  • Zarek – A name of uncertain origin, possibly a modern creation or a variant of the Polish name Zarek.
  • Zarita – A diminutive form of Sara, meaning “princess” in Hebrew.
  • Zaveria – Feminine form of Zaverio, meaning “new house” or “bright.”
  • Zdenko – Masculine form of Zdenka, meaning “of Sidon.”
  • Zefirina – Feminine form of Zefiro, related to Zephyr, the Greek god of the west wind.
  • Zelina – A variant of Zelia, possibly related to Celia, meaning “heaven.”
  • Zelma – A name of uncertain origin, possibly a variant of Selma, meaning “godly helmet.”
  • Zen – Short and modern-sounding name, possibly derived from Zenon or Zeno.
  • Zenia – A variant of Xenia, a Greek name meaning “hospitality.”
  • Zephyr – English form of Zefiro, referring to the Greek god of the west wind.
  • Zerlina – A diminutive form of names ending in -zera or an Italianate creation, possibly popularized by a character in Mozart’s opera “Don Giovanni.”

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