Tagalog Words That Are Spanish (Top 20)

Spain set foot in the Philippines and colonized its people in 1521. The Spaniards changed the ways of the Filipinos, even the language they speak. Today, the Philippines adopted various cultures and words from Spain, so some Tagalog words are actually Spanish words. So, we gathered the top 20 Tagalog words that are Spanish below.

Tagalog Words That Are Spanish (in Alphabetical Order)

Asar

Meaning:

  • (Verb) Asar is a borrowed word from Spanish that means to ridicule or roast someone. It is now a Filipino slang word and is mostly used by younger generations.
  • Tagalog: Hindi tama ang mang asar ng kapwa, lalo kung hindi naman siya nakikipag biruan.
  • Spanish: No está bien asar a alguien, especialmente si no está de humor para bromear.
  • English: It’s not right to roast someone, especially if they are not in the mood to joke.

Asikaso

Meaning:

  • (Verb) Asikaso is a Tagalog word derived from the Spanish word “hacer caso” which means to pay attention to someone or to notice a person. 
  • Tagalog: Mag asikaso ka muna ng bisita bago ka pumasok ng kwarto.
  • Spanish: Por favor, haz caso a los invitados antes de entrar en su habitación.
  • English: Please pay attention to the guests before you go to your room.

Ayuda

Meaning:

  • (Noun) Ayuda is a Spanish word for aid and was adopted by the Filipinos and used the word for the same meaning.
  • Tagalog: Wala man lang natanggap na ayuda ang mga nasalanta ng bagyo.
  • Spanish: Las personas que sufrieron el huracán no recibieron ninguna ayuda.
  • English: People who suffered from the hurricane did not receive any aid.

Bruha

Meaning:

  • (Noun) A bruha or bruja is a witch in Spanish, but in Tagalog, it is mainly used to call a woman with messy hair. 
  • Tagalog: Mukha kang bruha dahil sa buhok mo. Dapat kang matutong mag suklay.
  • Spanish: Pareces una bruja con tu pelo. Deberías aprender a cepillarte el pelo.
  • English: You look like a witch with your hair. You should learn to brush your hair.

Intindi

Meaning:

  • (Verb) The tagalog word “intindi” came from the Spanish word “entender” which means to understand someone or something.
  • Tagalog: Pag intindi ang kailangan ng kapatid mo para siya ang bumuti.
  • Spanish: Necesitas entender a tu hermano para que sea mejor.
  • English: You need to understand your brother for him to be better.

Kotse

Meaning:

  • (Noun) Kotse is the Tagalog word for a car in general. It was derived from the Spanish word “coche” and changed the spelling to fit better with the Tagalog dialect. Nowadays, it is pronounced the same.
  • Tagalog: Ayaw na umandar ng kotse. Panahon na para palitan ito.
  • Spanish: El coche ya no arranca. Es hora de cambiarlo.
  • English: The car won’t start anymore. It’s time to change it.

Kubeta

Meaning:

  • (Noun) Kubeta is a Tagalog word that means “toilet.” In Spanish, the term “cubeta” is a tray or a bucket. Back in the day, Filipinos used buckets or trays to relieve themselves.
  • Tagalog: May tao pa sa kubeta. Mamaya ka nalang bumalik.
  • Spanish: Alguien todavía está en el cubeta. Puedes volver más tarde.
  • English: Someone’s still in the toilet. You can come back later.

Kuwento

Meaning:

  • (Noun) Kwento is a Filipino word derived from the Spanish word “cuento” which means story. The spelling was changed to the letter “K” since Filipinos do not have the letter “C” in their alphabet back then.
  • Tagalog: Mahilig mag kuwento ang tatay ko. Ginagawa niya ito bago kami matulog.
  • Spanish: A mi padre le encanta contar cuentos. Lo hace antes de irse a la cama.
  • English: My father loves to tell stories. He does this before going to bed.

Lakwatsa

Meaning:

  • (Verb) Lakwatsa is a Filipino word that means gallivanting. It was borrowed from the word “la cuacha” which means wasting time by doing meaningless things.
  • Tagalog: Puro ka nalang lakwatsa. Bakit hindi ka maglinis ng bahay?
  • Spanish: Siempre eres la cuacha. ¿Por qué no limpias la casa?
  • English: You are always gallivanting. Why don’t you clean the house?

Lugar

Meaning:

  • (Noun)  The Spanish word “lugar” means “place.” It was adopted by the Filipinos as a Tagalog word with the same meaning. 
  • Tagalog: Hindi ko alam ang lugar na ito. Sigurado ka ba na dito tayo pupunta?
  • Spanish: No conozco este lugar. ¿Estás seguro de que vamos aquí?
  • English: I’m not familiar with this place. Are you sure we’re going here?

Gusto

Meaning:

  • (Verb) Gusto is a Spanish word for “like.” It is used when a person likes something or someone. It was borrowed by the Filipinos as a Tagalog word for the same meaning.
  • Tagalog: Gusto ko naman siya, ngunit hindi pa ito ang tamang panahon.
  • Spanish: A mí también me gusta, pero no es el momento adecuado.
  • English: l like him as well but it’s not the right time.

Maski

Meaning:

  • (Adjective) Maski is a Tagalog word that means “more than.” It was derived from the Spanish word “mas que” which also means “more than.”
  • Tagalog: Ito padin ang gusto ko maski sa pera. 
  • Spanish: Esto es todavía lo que quiero; más que dinero.
  • English: This is still what I want; more than money.

Masyado

Meaning:

  • (Adjective) The word “masyado” is a Tagalog word adopted from the Spanish word “demasiado.” The word means “too much” in English. Later on, the Filipinos dropped “de” from “demasiado” and turned it into what they use today.
  • Tagalog: Masyado nang matagal ang aking pag hihintay. Oras na para umalis.
  • Spanish: El tiempo de espera es demasiado para mi. Es tiempo de salir.
  • English: the waiting time is too much for me. It’s time to leave.

Merienda

Meaning:

  • (Noun) Merienda is originally a Spanish word that means “afternoon snack. It was later on adopted and made into a Tagalog word which also means “afternoon snack.”
  • Tagalog: May gusto ka bang merienda? Ipaghahanda kita.
  • Spanish: ¿Quieres una merienda? Te haré un poco.
  • English: Do you want an afternoon snack? I’ll make you some.

Regalo

Meaning:

  • (Noun) The Spanish word “regalo” was borrowed by the Filipinos and used as a Tagalog word for “gift.” In Spanish, it also has the same meaning.
  • Tagalog: Meron akong ibibigay na regalo sa iyo. Sana magustuhan mo.
  • Spanish: Tengo un regalo para ti. Espero que te guste.
  • English: II have a gift for you. I hope you’ll like it.

Sige

Meaning:

  • (Verb) Sige was originally a Spanish word that means “follow” but was later on borrowed as a Tagalog word for “go ahead.” Nowadays, it also means “okay.”
  • Tagalog: Sige, gawin mo. Sino ang mapapagalitan sa gagawin mo?
  • Spanish: Sige, hazlo. ¿Quién crees que será reprendido por lo que estás a punto de hacer?
  • English: Go ahead, do it. Who do you think will be reprimanded for what you’re about to do?

Trabaho

Meaning:

  • (Noun) When forcing Filipino slaves to work, the Spaniards would then shout the word “trabajo!” to tell them to work harder. Nowadays, it is used as a Tagalog word for the same meaning but spelled with an “H” instead of a “J.”
  • Tagalog: Kailangan ko ng trabaho. Magugutom ang pamilya ko kapag hindi pa ako makahanap ngayon.
  • Spanish: Necesito trabajo. Mi familia pasará hambre si no encuentro uno ahora.
  • English: I need work. My family will starve if I don’t find one now.

Tropa

Meaning:

  • (Noun) The Spanish word for “tropa” means group or troop. In Tagalog, tropa is slang for “friends.” It was adopted into the Tagalog language because Filipinos love to gather in a group and most Filipinos have large groups of friends.
  • Tagalog: Hinihintay na tayo ng ating tropa. Kanina pa sila sa labas ng eskwelahan.
  • Spanish: La tropa ya nos está esperando. Están esperando afuera de la escuela.
  • English: The troop is already waiting for us. They’re waiting outside the school.

Tsinelas

Meaning:

  • (Noun) Tsinelas is the Filipino word for “slippers.” In Spanish, “chinelas” is plural while “chinela” is only a single slipper.
  • Tagalog: Nawawala nanaman ang tsinelas ko. Sino ba ang gumagamit nito?
  • Spanish: Mis pantuflas vuelven a faltar. ¿Quién los sigue usando?
  • English: My slippers are missing again. Who keeps using them?

Tsismis

Meaning:

  • (Noun) The Tagalog word “tsismis” came from the Spanish word “chisme” which means gossip. 
  • Tagalog: Puro nalang tsismis ang inaatupag mo! Tulungan mo ang nanay sa tindahan.
  • Spanish: ¡Todo lo que haces es chismear! Ve a ayudar a mamá en la tienda.
  • English: All you do is gossip! Go, help mom at the store.

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