Top 1200 Viking Names From A-Z (2024)

Written by Gabriel Cruz - Foodie, Animal Lover, Slang & Language Enthusiast

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Embark on a captivating journey with our latest blog post: “Top 1200 Viking Names From A-Z (2024)”! Delve into the world of Viking culture and discover over 1200 names, each with a unique story and rich meaning. From Asbjorn to Yngvar, these names are more than just labels; they’re a glimpse into an era of exploration and myth. Perfect for history lovers, writers, or the curious, our list has something for everyone. Find a name that resonates with you or inspires your next character. Don’t forget to share your favorites and spread the word among Viking enthusiasts. Your saga starts now!

A

viking names start with A

  • Aaric – A unique name that may mean “eternal ruler” or “ever-powerful.”
  • Aegir – In Norse mythology, Aegir is the god of the sea and the personification of the ocean.
  • Aesir – Refers to the principal pantheon in Norse mythology, which includes gods like Odin and Thor.
  • Agnar – Means “sharp” or “sword’s edge,” and is associated with warriors.
  • Alaric – A name of Germanic origin meaning “all-powerful ruler.”
  • Alf – Derived from Old Norse, meaning “elf.”
  • Alfarinn – Possibly means “traveling elves” or could be interpreted as “elf army.”
  • Alfhild – A combination of “elf” and “battle,” often associated with mythical tales.
  • Alfrik – A name that can be translated to “elf ruler.”
  • Alrik – Similar to Alaric, meaning “all-powerful ruler.”
  • Andor – A variant of the name Thor, or possibly means “eagle.”
  • Anlaf – Old Norse for “ancestor’s descendant.”
  • Ansgar – Scandinavian name meaning “spear of god.”
  • Aric – A variant of Eric, meaning “eternal ruler.”
  • Arinbjorn – Means “eagle bear” in Old Norse.
  • Arioch – A name of uncertain origin, but may be related to a character mentioned in the Bible.
  • Armod – Translates to “warrior spirit” in Old Norse.
  • Arn – Short for names beginning with “Arn-” or means “eagle.”
  • Arnbjorn – Means “eagle bear,” similar to Arinbjorn.
  • Arndis – A name that combines “arn” (eagle) and “dis” (goddess or noblewoman).
  • Arne – Derived from Old Norse, meaning “eagle.”
  • Arni – Another variant meaning “eagle.”
  • Arnkel – A combination of “arn” (eagle) and “kel” (kettle or helmet).
  • Arnor – Means “eagle warrior.”
  • Arnthor – Means “eagle” and “Thor,” the Norse god of thunder.
  • Asbjorn – Translates to “god bear” or “divine warrior.”
  • Asgeir – Means “god’s spear.”
  • Asger – A variant of Asgeir, meaning “god’s spear.”
  • Asgrim – Means “god’s mask” or perhaps “fierce.”
  • Askel – A variant of Askell, meaning “divine cauldron.”
  • Askold – A historical Viking name possibly meaning “God’s helmet.”
  • Aslak – Means “god’s play” or “sport of the gods.”
  • Asmund – Means “god’s protection.”
  • Asulf – A name that can be translated to “god wolf.”
  • Atli – Old Norse for “little father” or possibly refers to a historical king.
  • Audun – Means “prosperity” or “fortune.”
  • Augmund – A name that means “eye protection” or “the one who is protected by the gods.”
  • Austri – Means “east” in Old Norse, one of the dwarves in mythology.
  • Avaldamon – An obscure name of uncertain meaning.
  • Avarr – A name that could mean “warrior” or “guardian.”
  • Ave – Possibly a derivative of “Avei,” which might mean “ancestor.”
  • Axel – Derived from the biblical name Absalom, meaning “father of peace.”
  • Axelson – Means “son of Axel.”
  • Axl – A shortened form of Axel, meaning “father of peace.”
  • Azur – A name that could be derived from “azure,” meaning “blue” like the sky.
  • Aage – A Scandinavian name meaning “ancestor.”
  • Aake – A variant of Aage, meaning “ancestor.”
  • Aalbjorn – Means “eel bear” or could be interpreted as a protective warrior.
  • Aalmund – A name that combines “aal” (eel) and “mund” (protection).
  • Aarstein – Means “eagle stone” or could refer to someone as solid and reliable as rock.

B

viking names start with B

  • Bjorn – Means “bear” in Old Norse, a common name for warriors.
  • Brandr – Derives from the Old Norse word for “sword” or “fire.”
  • Bjorg – An Old Norse name meaning “help, salvation.”
  • Bodil – Possibly a combination of “bod” (remedy) or “bod” (command) and “hildr” (battle).
  • Biorn – A variant of Bjorn, meaning “bear.”
  • Bragi – The name of the Norse god of poetry and eloquence.
  • Bjarke – Derived from “bjǫrn” (bear) and possibly “arkr” (box, chest), suggesting strength.
  • Borkr – An Old Norse name meaning “birch tree” or possibly “fortification.”
  • Bergthora – A female name combining “berg” (mountain) or “bjǫrg” (protection) with “Þóra” (from Thor).
  • Baldur – The Norse god of beauty, love, happiness, and purity in Norse mythology.
  • Borgar – Meaning “fortress” or “protection,” reflecting strength and safety.
  • Barri – Possibly from an Old Norse word meaning “grain,” which could be associated with prosperity.
  • Bolli – Could be related to “bolla” meaning “bowl” or “ball,” but the exact meaning is unclear.
  • Bui – Means “resident” from Old Norse, possibly denoting a settled person.
  • Bruni – From the Old Norse word “brunna,” meaning “spring” or “fountain.”
  • Brand – A variant of Brandr, meaning “sword” or “fire.”
  • Botolf – An Old Norse name derived from “bót” (remedy) and “úlfr” (wolf).
  • Birger – Means “keeper” or “guardian” from the Old Norse “bjarga,” to save or rescue.
  • Bera – A female name meaning “bear” or could also refer to a “she-bear.”
  • Birna – Feminine form of Bjorn, also meaning “bear.”
  • Birgir – Another variant of Birger, meaning “keeper” or “guardian.”
  • Bendik – A form of Benedict, meaning “blessed” in Latin.
  • Bjarney – Possibly from “bjǫrn” (bear) and “ey” (island), meaning “bear island.”
  • Barði – Likely from “barð,” meaning “edge” of a mountain or cliff.
  • Brondolf – A combination of “brand,” meaning “sword,” and “ulf,” meaning “wolf.”
  • Bjarte – Derived from “bjart,” meaning “bright” in Old Norse.
  • Boði – An Old Norse name, possibly meaning “the one who brings news” from “boð.”
  • Bjolv – A lesser-known name with uncertain meaning, possibly related to “Bjorn.”
  • Bjartr – Means “bright” or “famous” in Old Norse.
  • Birki – Likely derived from “birki,” meaning “birch tree.”
  • Bergfinn – A combination of “berg,” meaning “mountain,” and “Finn,” possibly referring to a person from Finland or a Sámi person.
  • Bjalfi – Name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to “Bjorn.”
  • Brond – A shortened form of Brondolf, combining “sword” and “wolf.”
  • Burizleifr – An obscure name with unclear meaning.
  • Bolthorn – Means “evil thorn” or “thorn” in Old Norse, possibly a name with magical connotations.
  • Bjarni – Derived from “bjǫrn,” meaning “bear.”
  • Brondulf – A variant of Brondolf, meaning “sword wolf.”
  • Botvid – An Old Norse name meaning “help in battle” from “bót” and “viðr” (wood or forest).
  • Brynjar – Means “armor” or “armored warrior” from Old Norse.
  • Borr – In Norse mythology, the father of Odin, Vili, and Vé.
  • Bolthor – A variant of Bolthorn, meaning “evil thorn” or simply “thorn.”
  • Bolverk – A name Odin assumed when disguised; it means “evil deed” or “worker of evil.”
  • Brodir – Means “brother” in Old Norse, signifying fraternal bonds or fraternity.
  • Brynjolf – A combination of “brynja” (mail armor) and “ulf” (wolf), signifying a warrior.
  • Bregi – An Old Norse name of uncertain meaning.
  • Borgny – A female name meaning “new help” or “new salvation” from “borg” and “ný.”
  • Bruni – As previously mentioned, means “spring” or “fountain” in Old Norse.

C

viking names start with C

  • Cáel – A name of Gaelic origin, meaning “slender” or “narrow.”
  • Cai – A name of Latin origin, it is a variant of Gaius, meaning “rejoice.”
  • Calvör – This name is less common and might be a variant of Scandinavian names, possibly meaning “bald” due to its similarity to “calv,” which is Latin for bald.
  • Canute – A Scandinavian name derived from the Old Norse Knútr, meaning “knot.”
  • Carin – A variant of Karen, which is a Danish form of Katherine, meaning “pure.”
  • Carita – Derived from the Latin ‘caritas’ meaning “charity” or “love.”
  • Carl – The Germanic form of Charles, meaning “free man.”
  • Carle – A variation of Carl or Charles, with the same meaning of “free man.”
  • Carsten – A Low German form of Christian, meaning “follower of Christ.”
  • Casper – A name of Persian origin meaning “treasurer,” linked to the Wise Men in the Christian tradition.
  • Cathrine – A Scandinavian form of Katherine, meaning “pure.”
  • Cecilia – A name of Latin origin meaning “blind to one’s own beauty.”
  • Cedric – Invented by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his novel “Ivanhoe,” possibly based on Cerdic, the name of a Saxon king.
  • Cenric – An Anglo-Saxon name meaning “bold power.”
  • Cerdic – A historical name of uncertain meaning, possibly “beloved by his people.”
  • Cesil – Likely a variant of Cecil, from the Latin name Caecilius, meaning “blind.”
  • Charin – Possibly a variant of Karen or a modern creation.
  • Charles – Derived from the Germanic name Karl, meaning “man” or “free man.”
  • Chlodwig – A Germanic name, the original form of Ludwig, meaning “famous warrior.”
  • Christen – A variant of Christian, meaning “follower of Christ.”
  • Christian – From the Latin Christianus, meaning “follower of Christ.”
  • Christoffer – A Scandinavian form of Christopher, meaning “bearer of Christ.”
  • Cilla – A diminutive of Cecilia, meaning “blind to one’s own beauty.”
  • Cimber – Likely a historical surname of unclear origin, possibly related to a Roman family name.
  • Clara – A name of Latin origin meaning “clear,” “bright,” or “famous.”
  • Clarimond – A name of Germanic origin, meaning “brilliant protector.”
  • Claus – A short form of Nicholas, meaning “victory of the people,” in German-speaking countries.
  • Clement – A name of Latin origin meaning “merciful” or “gentle.”
  • Clotilda – A Germanic name meaning “famous in battle.”
  • Coen – A variant of the Dutch name Coenraad, meaning “bold advisor.”
  • Coenraad – A Dutch form of Conrad, meaning “bold advisor.”
  • Colban – A name of Scottish origin, meaning “black Colin.”
  • Colby – An English place name meaning “coal town.”
  • Cole – Derived from the Old English “cola,” meaning “dark” or “coal.”
  • Colman – An Anglicized form of the Irish name Colmán, meaning “dove.”
  • Conrad – A Germanic name meaning “bold advisor.”
  • Constance – From the Latin Constans, meaning “constant” or “steadfast.”
  • Cord – Possibly a short form of Concord or a Germanic name meaning “bold counsel.”
  • Corentine – A Breton name possibly meaning “hurricane” or “tempest.”
  • Corin – Possibly derived from Quirinus, a Roman god’s name meaning “spear.”
  • Corinna – A Greek name meaning “maiden,” it is the feminine form of Corin.
  • Cornelius – Of Latin origin, meaning “horn,” it was a common Roman family name.
  • Cort – A short form of the name Conrad or a Dutch name meaning “bold” or “courtly.”
  • Cosette – A French name that became famous through Victor Hugo’s “Les Misérables,” likely derived from “cosse,” meaning “little thing.”
  • Craig – Of Scottish origin, meaning “rock” or “crag.”
  • Creighton – An English surname meaning “border settlement” or “ridge town.”
  • Crichton – A Scottish surname meaning “ridge settlement,” similar in origin to Creighton.
  • Crispin – Of Latin origin, meaning “curly-haired.”
  • Cristen – A variant of Kristen or Christian, meaning “follower of Christ.”
  • Cynric – An Anglo-Saxon name meaning “royal power.”

D

viking names start with D

  • Dag – Derived from Old Norse, meaning “day,” possibly referring to the brightness of the day.
  • Dagfinn – A combination of “Dag” meaning “day” and “Finn,” which could refer to someone from Finland or a Sámi person.
  • Dagny – From Old Norse elements “dagr” (day) and “ný” (new), meaning “new day” or “new beginning.”
  • Dale – Likely from an Old Norse word meaning “valley,” a common geographical feature in Scandinavia.
  • Dan – Could be derived from an Old Norse word meaning a “Dane,” referring to someone from Denmark.
  • Danby – This name combines “Dan” (Dane) with “by” (village or settlement), meaning a Danish settlement.
  • Darby – Similar to Danby, “Darby” combines “deorr” (deer) with “by,” referring to a deer settlement or farm.
  • Darra – Possibly from an Old Norse word meaning “to lurk” or “to wait.”
  • Darri – A diminutive form of names beginning with “Dar,” possibly meaning “little spear.”
  • Denby – From Old Norse “Danabyr,” meaning “the Danes’ settlement.”
  • Dior – Possibly related to the Old Norse “dýrr,” meaning “dear” or “precious.”
  • Dir – A shorter form of names beginning with “Dir,” potentially meaning “beast” or “animal.”
  • Djarfr – Derived from Old Norse, meaning “bold” or “brave.”
  • Dofri – An Old Norse name, possibly meaning “mountain dweller.”
  • Dolk – Likely from an Old Norse word meaning “dagger” or “knife.”
  • Dorr – Could be related to the Old Norse word “dórr,” meaning “spear.”
  • Drafn – From Old Norse, meaning “driftwood,” possibly implying something or someone that travels.
  • Draki – Means “dragon” in Old Norse, symbolizing strength and power.
  • Drifa – Derived from Old Norse, meaning “snowdrift,” suggesting purity or beauty.
  • Drott – Originates from Old Norse “drótt,” referring to a lord or master.
  • Droplaug – A combination of Old Norse “drop” (drop) and “laug” (pledge), possibly meaning “pledge drop.”
  • Dufa – Could be from an Old Norse word meaning “dove,” symbolizing peace.
  • Dufniall – A unique name possibly combining “dufa” (dove) with “Njáll,” a common Norse name.
  • Dufthak – A rare name that might combine “dufa” with “Þak,” meaning “roof” or “covering.”
  • Dul – A shorter form of Norse names, possibly meaning “hidden” or “secret.”
  • Dund – May derive from Old Norse “dundr,” meaning “a rumbling noise” like thunder.
  • Duneyrr – From Norse mythology, one of the four harts (deer) that feed on the branches of Yggdrasil.
  • Dunfjall – Combines “dunn” (down or feather) with “fjall” (mountain), possibly meaning “feather mountain.”
  • Dunfriðr – A unique name that might blend “dunn” with “friðr,” meaning “beautiful” or “beloved.”
  • Dungadr – Could be from Old Norse elements meaning “dark” and “spear.”
  • Dungal – A name that may combine “dunn” with “gall,” meaning “stranger” or “foreigner.”
  • Dungr – Possibly related to Old Norse “dungr,” meaning “down” or “feather.”
  • Duni – A diminutive or endearing form of names beginning with “Dun-.”
  • Dunmarr – Likely a combination of “dunn” and “marr,” which could mean “horse.”
  • Dunn – From Old Norse, meaning “brown,” often referring to the color of hair or fur.
  • Dunning – This name might mean “descendant of Dunn” or “son of the brown one.”
  • Dunr – A shorter form of Norse names beginning with “Dun-,” potentially meaning “brown.”
  • Durr – Possibly derived from Old Norse, meaning “door” or “gate.”
  • Dvalin – In Norse mythology, Dvalin is a dwarf, and the name might mean “delaying” or “slumbering.”
  • Dyggvi – From Old Norse “dyggr,” meaning “faithful” or “brave.”
  • Dyngvi – An ancient Norse name, possibly related to “Dyggvi,” with a similar meaning.
  • Dynr – Could be from an Old Norse word meaning “noise” or “din.”
  • Dynri – A diminutive or variant form of “Dynr,” meaning “little noise” or “little din.”
  • Dyri – From Old Norse, meaning “animal” or “beast,” possibly used as a nickname.
  • Dyrleif – Combines “dyr” (animal) with “leif” (heir or descendant), meaning “animal heir.”
  • Dyrnar – Likely derived from “dyr,” meaning “animals,” and could be a plural form or a possessive.
  • Dyrri – A diminutive form of “Dyri,” meaning “little animal” or “little beast.”
  • Dyrrinn – An Old Norse name that could mean “the door” or “the gate.”
  • Dyst – May come from an Old Norse word meaning “dust” or “tumult.”
  • Dyvill – A rare name, possibly from Old Norse elements meaning “deviation” or “wandering.”
 

E

viking names start with E

  • Eadric – An Old English name meaning “wealthy ruler.”
  • Ealdred – Derived from Old English elements meaning “old” and “counsel.”
  • Eanfrid – A combination of Old English words for “grace” or “favor” and “peace.”
  • Eanhere – An Old English name meaning “brave.”
  • Eardwulf – Means “earth wolf” in Old English, likely signifying a strong connection with nature.
  • Earmund – Originates from Old English, meaning “protection.”
  • Earngrim – Composed of elements meaning “eagle” and “fierce” or “grim.”
  • Earnulf – A name meaning “eagle wolf,” suggesting a person with attributes of both animals.
  • Earric – An Old English name, possibly meaning “rich power.”
  • Eastmund – Means “grace” and “protection,” from Old English origins.
  • Eata – Of uncertain meaning, possibly related to Old English names with the element “eat.”
  • Ebba – Derived from an Old English name meaning “fortress.”
  • Ecgberht – Means “bright edge,” from Old English, referring to a sword.
  • Ecgfrid – A name meaning “peaceful edge,” possibly a reference to a peace-bringing sword.
  • Ecgwulf – Combines “edge” or “sword” with “wolf,” suggesting a fierce warrior.
  • Edric – Old English for “rich ruler.”
  • Edulf – Another form of the name Eadwulf, meaning “wealthy wolf.”
  • Eegil – A variant of Egil, a Norse name meaning “respect” or “fear.”
  • Eerika – A feminine form of Eirik, meaning “eternal ruler.”
  • Eerikki – A Finnish variant of Eric, meaning “eternal ruler.”
  • Egil – From Old Norse, meaning “respect” or “fear,” possibly a reference to a respected warrior.
  • Eginhard – A name of Germanic origin, meaning “hard edge” or “brave.”
  • Egor – A Russian form of George, meaning “farmer” or “earth-worker.”
  • Eilaf – A name of uncertain origin and meaning, possibly related to Old Norse elements.
  • Eilif – A Norse name meaning “eternal heir.”
  • Eiliv – Old Norse in origin, meaning “eternal life.”
  • Einar – Means “one warrior” or “alone, warrior,” from Old Norse.
  • Eindride – A name meaning “lone rider” or “unique rider” in Old Norse.
  • Eirik – Old Norse for “eternal ruler.”
  • Eitri – In Norse mythology, a dwarf who crafted many magical objects.
  • Ejvind – A Scandinavian name meaning “island wind.”
  • Elaf – Of uncertain meaning, possibly related to Old Norse names with “elf.”
  • Eldgrim – Means “fire” and “fierce” or “grim,” suggesting a fierce fighter.
  • Elgard – Possibly derived from Old Norse elements meaning “divine enclosure.”
  • Elif – A name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to the Norse element “elf.”
  • Elling – A diminutive form of names beginning with “Elli,” related to Old Norse elements.
  • Elmund – Means “noble protection,” from Old English origins.
  • Elrik – A variant of Alaric, meaning “all-powerful ruler.”
  • Eluf – A name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to Norse names meaning “heir” or “descendant.”
  • Elvar – An Old Norse name meaning “elf warrior.”
  • Elvi – A name of uncertain origin, possibly a variant of Olaf or related to “elf.”
  • Elvid – Likely a variant of Elvid, meaning “elf warrior.”
  • Elvor – A name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to Old Norse elements for “elf.”
  • Emund – An Old Norse name meaning “wealthy protector.”
  • Endrid – A variant of Eindride, meaning “lone rider” or “unique rider.”
  • Engli – Possibly derived from Old Norse, meaning “Englishman.”
  • Enulv – A name of uncertain meaning, likely of Old Norse origin.
  • Erland – Means “foreigner” or “stranger” in Old Norse.
  • Ermund – A name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to Old Norse elements for “protection.”
  • Eyvind – A Scandinavian name meaning “island wind” or “lucky warrior.”

F

viking names start with F

  • Faste – A Norse name that may mean “firm” or “steadfast.”
  • Fenrir – Named after the monstrous wolf in Norse mythology, prophesied to kill Odin during Ragnarök.
  • Fjalar – In Norse mythology, Fjalar is a dwarf involved in the creation of the mead of poetry.
  • Fjolnir – A legendary Danish king in Norse sagas, sometimes also associated with the god Freyr.
  • Fjorgyn – In Norse mythology, Fjorgyn is considered to be the personification of the earth, and the mother of Thor.
  • Fjori – A name of Old Norse origin, possibly related to “fjǫr” meaning “life” or “vitality.”
  • Folke – A name derived from Old Norse, meaning “people” or “tribe.”
  • Folkvar – A name that could be interpreted as “guardian of the people.”
  • Forman – Likely a variation of an Old Norse name meaning “strong” or “vigorous.”
  • Frey – A variant of Freyr, the Norse god of fertility, weather, and wealth.
  • Freya – The Norse goddess of love, beauty, and fertility, sister of Freyr.
  • Freydis – A female name which may be derived from the Norse goddess Freya, with “dis” meaning goddess.
  • Freyr – A Norse god associated with kingship, virility, peace, and prosperity.
  • Frida – Meaning “peace” or “beautiful,” possibly derived from the Norse goddess Frigg.
  • Fridleif – Means “descendant of peace,” combining “frid” (peace) and “leif” (descendant/heir).
  • Frodi – A legendary Danish king from Norse sagas, known for his peaceful reign.
  • Frothi – A variation of Frodi, also referring to the legendary peaceful king.
  • Fulla – In Norse mythology, Fulla is a goddess, a handmaid and confidant of Frigg.
  • Funi – An Old Norse name that may mean “fire.”
  • Fylkir – An Old Norse term for “leader” or “ruler.”
  • Fyren – This name could be a variation of an Old Norse name meaning “fire” or “fiery.”
  • Fabbe – Likely a diminutive form of a Norse name, possibly related to “Fabian” or a pet name.
  • Fadhir – Possibly a misspelling or variation of an Old Norse name, the meaning is uncertain.
  • Faege – An Old Norse name that could be related to “faegi” meaning “doomed to die” or “timid.”
  • Faerun – A name of uncertain meaning, possibly a variation of an Old Norse name.
  • Fagri – May mean “beautiful” or “fair” in Old Norse.
  • Fakse – A name that might be derived from the Old Norse word for “horse mane.”
  • Falki – Derived from Old Norse, meaning “falcon,” suggesting a person with keen sight.
  • Falla – A name that could be related to “fall” in Old Norse, possibly meaning “to fall” or “to trip,” but the exact meaning is uncertain.
  • Fannar – A Norse name meaning “snow drift,” indicative of a person born in harsh, snowy conditions.
  • Farald – This name could mean “journey” or “traveler,” from the Old Norse word “far.”
  • Farbjorn – Combining “far” (journey/travel) and “bjorn” (bear), it could mean “traveler bear” or “warrior bear.”
  • Farin – Possibly a variant of “faring,” related to traveling or someone who is on a journey.
  • Farkas – A Hungarian name meaning “wolf,” not originally Norse but often associated with warrior-like qualities.
  • Farman – Likely meaning “journey man” or “traveler,” from the Old Norse “far.”
  • Farulf – Combining “far” (journey) and “ulf” (wolf), it might mean “wolf of the journey” or “traveling wolf.”
  • Fastulf – A Norse name that combines “fast” (firm or fastened) with “ulf” (wolf), perhaps meaning “firm wolf” or “steadfast wolf.”
  • Fauki – An Old Norse name possibly related to “falki,” meaning “falcon.”
  • Feilan – A name of uncertain origin, possibly a variant of an Old Norse name with an unknown meaning.
  • Felagi – Derived from Old Norse “félagi,” meaning “partner” or “comrade,” indicating a person who is a good companion.
  • Fenja – One of the mythological giantesses who grinds the mill in the Grottasöngr saga, symbolizing hard work.
  • Fenki – A name of uncertain meaning, it could be a diminutive or variation of a Norse name related to “fen” (marsh).
  • Fenris – Another form of Fenrir, referring to the mythological wolf who is destined to fight Odin during Ragnarök.
  • Fialar – A Norse name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to “fjall” meaning “mountain.”
  • Fiann – A name of uncertain Norse origin, the meaning is not clear.
  • Fidrir – Likely a misspelling or variation of “Fenrir,” the monstrous wolf in Norse mythology.
  • Fili – In Norse mythology, Fili is one of the dwarves who created many magical items for the gods.
  • Finnbogi – A Norse name meaning “Finn’s bow” or “bowman,” indicating a skilled archer.
  • Finnr – Meaning “Sámi” or “Finn,” referring to the indigenous people traditionally inhabiting the Arctic area.
  • Fiske – Derived from the Old Norse word “fiskr,” meaning “fish,” possibly indicating a fisherman or someone associated with the sea.

G

viking names start with G

  • Gad – Likely a variation of a Norse name, possibly related to good fortune or luck.
  • Gaeir – An Old Norse name that may mean “spear.”
  • Gaer – A name of uncertain meaning, possibly a variant of “Gaeir,” which would also suggest a connection to “spear.”
  • Galdra – Likely derived from Old Norse, meaning “magic” or “sorcery,” indicative of someone associated with enchantments.
  • Galinn – Possibly means “enchanted” or “bewitched” in Old Norse, suggesting a magical connotation.
  • Gamal – An Old Norse name meaning “old,” signifying wisdom or experience.
  • Gandalf – A name combining “gandr” (magic staff) and “álf” (elf), meaning “elf with a magic staff,” famously used by J.R.R. Tolkien.
  • Gange – May refer to someone who walks well, from the Old Norse “gangr,” meaning “walk” or “journey.”
  • Gangi – Similar to “Gange,” potentially referring to a good traveler or walker.
  • Gardar – A Norse name meaning “guard” or “keeper,” implying someone who protects.
  • Garm – In Norse mythology, Garm is a dog associated with Ragnarök, and the name could mean “loud” or “noisy.”
  • Garmund – A combination of “garmr” (loud) and “mundr” (protection), possibly meaning “loud protector.”
  • Gaut – A name referring to the Geats, an ancient North Germanic tribe, possibly meaning “Geat.”
  • Gauti – A diminutive form of “Gaut,” also referring to the Geats or someone from Geatland.
  • Geir – Derives from Old Norse “geirr,” meaning “spear,” a common element in Norse names.
  • Geirfinn – A compound of “geirr” (spear) and “finnr” (Sámi or person from Finland), perhaps meaning “Sámi spearman” or “Finnish spearman.”
  • Geirmund – Combines “geirr” (spear) and “mundr” (protection), suggesting “protector with a spear.”
  • Geirr – A variant of “Geir,” again meaning “spear.”
  • Geirstein – Merges “geirr” (spear) and “steinn” (stone), possibly meaning “stone spear” or “firm as a spear.”
  • Geirulf – Combines “geirr” (spear) and “úlfr” (wolf), meaning “wolf with a spear” or “spear wolf.”
  • Gelmir – Uncertain meaning, but may involve “gel,” potentially related to “yell” or “shout” in Old Norse.
  • Gerd – A Norse name meaning “enclosure,” which is also the name of a giantess in Norse mythology.
  • Geri – Means “greedy” in Old Norse, also the name of one of Odin’s wolves.
  • Gersemi – Comes from Old Norse, meaning “treasure” or “jewel,” and is also the name of a daughter of the goddess Freyja.
  • Gest – An Old Norse word meaning “guest” or “stranger,” indicating hospitality.
  • Gestil – A variant of “Gest,” with a similar meaning related to a guest or visitor.
  • Gestumblindi – A mythical name from sagas, possibly meaning “blind guest,” associated with cleverness or disguise.
  • Gevar – A Norse name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to the sea or hunting.
  • Gif – Likely a short form or variant of a larger Norse name, the meaning is unclear.
  • Gigja – A name with unknown meaning, possibly a female name derived from Old Norse.
  • Gilla – An Old Norse name that might mean “servant” or “youth.”
  • Gille – A variant of “Gilla,” with a similar possible meaning.
  • Gilling – May derive from “gildr,” meaning “valuable” or “precious” in Old Norse.
  • Ginnarr – An Old Norse name meaning “deceiver” or “trickster,” suggesting cunning.
  • Ginnungagap – The primordial void in Norse cosmology, not typically a personal name.
  • Gisl – Derived from Old Norse, meaning “hostage” or “pledge.”
  • Gisli – A variation of “Gisl,” potentially meaning “ray of light” or “shining pledge.”
  • Gissur – Possibly a variation of “Gisli,” with a similar meaning related to hostages or pledges.
  • Gjafa – Means “giver” in Old Norse, indicating generosity or a gift-giver.
  • Gjalp – The name of a giantess in Norse mythology, the meaning is uncertain.
  • Gjuki – A name from the Völsunga saga, possibly related to a legendary king or family.
  • Glaer – An Old Norse name that could mean “glass” or “clear,” suggesting transparency or clarity.
  • Glum – May mean “gloom” or “dark,” indicating a somber or serious personality.
  • Glumr – A variant of “Glum,” with a similar connotation.
  • Glunni – A Norse name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to “glum.”
  • Gna – The name of a goddess who serves Frigg in Norse mythology, meaning is unknown.
  • Gnipa – An Old Norse name, the meaning is unclear, but may relate to a geographical feature like a peak or crag.
  • Gode – May mean “good” or “godly” in Old Norse, suggesting a virtuous or religious person.
  • Gofugr – A Norse name of uncertain meaning, potentially related to dignity or magnificence.
  • Gorm – An Old Norse name meaning “he who worships god” or possibly “vigilant.”

H

viking names start with H

  • Halvar – Likely derived from Old Norse elements meaning “rock” or “defense” and “warrior.”
  • Halvdan – A traditional Norse name meaning “half Danish,” indicating mixed ancestry or heritage.
  • Halvor – Composed of Old Norse elements meaning “rock” or “defense” and “guardian.”
  • Hamund – Possibly means “high protection” in Old Norse, suggesting a person of strong defense.
  • Harald – A classic Viking name meaning “army ruler” or “war chief.”
  • Harbard – A name that could mean “grey-bearded warrior,” possibly a pseudonym for the god Odin.
  • Harek – Derived from Old Norse, possibly meaning “strong, hearty.”
  • Hastein – A Viking name that might mean “stone” or “rock” combined with “stone.”
  • Havard – Old Norse for “high guardian” or “high defender.”
  • Hedinn – Possibly from Old Norse, meaning “the one in furs” or “fur-clad.”
  • Helge – Meaning “holy” or “blessed” in Old Norse, indicating a person of high spiritual status.
  • Helgi – A variant of Helge, with the same meaning of “holy” or “blessed.”
  • Helgrim – Combines “holy” or “blessed” with “grim,” which could mean “mask” or “helmet.”
  • Helli – A diminutive or variant of names starting with “Hel,” meaning “holy” or “blessed.”
  • Heming – Possibly derived from Old Norse, meaning “shape changer” or “shape shifter.”
  • Hemir – A rare name that could be related to “hem,” meaning “home” or “village.”
  • Herbjorn – Means “warrior bear” from the Old Norse elements “her” (army) and “bjorn” (bear).
  • Herfast – Old Norse name possibly meaning “army,” “fast,” or “firm.”
  • Hergeir – A combination of “army” and “spear,” suggesting a warrior armed with a spear.
  • Heri – Short form of names beginning with the Old Norse element “her,” meaning “army.”
  • Herjolf – Means “army wolf,” from “her” (army) and “ulf” (wolf).
  • Herleif – Old Norse for “descendant of the army” or “heir of the army.”
  • Herleik – Combines “army” with “play” or “game,” possibly indicating a strategic warrior.
  • Herman – From Old Norse “her” and “man,” meaning “army man” or “soldier.”
  • Hermund – Meaning “army protection,” from the Norse elements “her” and “mund.”
  • Hervar – Could mean “warrior,” from Old Norse elements “her” (army) and “varr” (defender).
  • Hildir – A name derived from “hildr,” which means “battle” in Old Norse.
  • Hildor – A variant of Hildir, with the same meaning related to “battle.”
  • Hjalmarr – From Old Norse elements meaning “helmet” and “famous.”
  • Hjarrandi – Possibly from Old Norse, meaning “screaming” or “shrieking” in battle.
  • Hjortr – Old Norse for “hart” or “stag,” a name that could be linked to hunting or nobility.
  • Hlodver – A name that could mean “famous heir” or “famous host.”
  • Hnakki – A diminutive form of a name, possibly related to “neck” or “projecting.”
  • Hnokki – Likely a variant spelling of Hnakki, with the same potential meanings.
  • Hoddi – A diminutive or nickname form of a longer Norse name, possibly related to “hood” or “hat.”
  • Hofi – A rare name that might be a diminutive or pet form of a longer Norse name.
  • Holmgeir – Combining “island” with “spear,” possibly indicating a warrior from an island.
  • Holmir – A name that might combine “island” with “famous.”
  • Horik – Possibly from Old Norse, though the meaning is uncertain; may be related to “thor” or “horse.”
  • Hrafn – Old Norse for “raven,” a bird often associated with battle and the god Odin.
  • Hrafngar – A compound of “hrafn” (raven) and “geirr” (spear), perhaps meaning “raven of the spear.”
  • Hrafnkel – From Old Norse, meaning “raven” and “kettle” or “helmet.”
  • Hreidarr – Possibly means “nest” or “home” combined with “army.”
  • Hring – Old Norse for “ring” or “circle,” possibly denoting a leader or someone associated with a ring-shaped object.
  • Hroald – A variant of Harald, meaning “army ruler” or “war chief.”
  • Hrodgeir – Combines “fame” with “spear,” indicating a renowned spearman.
  • Hrolf – A variant of the name Rolf, derived from the Norse for “fame” and “wolf.”
  • Hromund – From Old Norse elements meaning “fame” and “protection.”
  • Hrut – Old Norse, possibly meaning “ram,” a male sheep, indicating strength.
  • Huginn – One of Odin’s ravens in Norse mythology, meaning “thought” or “spirit.”

I

viking names start with I

  • Ivar – Derived from Old Norse elements ‘yr’, meaning bow or yew, and ‘arr’, meaning warrior, suggesting a skilled archer.
  • Ingvar – A name composed of the Norse god name ‘Yngvi’ (another name for the god Freyr) and ‘arr’, meaning warrior, often associated with protection.
  • Inge – A short form of names beginning with the Old Norse element ‘Ing-‘, referring to the Norse god Yngvi.
  • Ingrid – Means “beautiful” or “fair” and is derived from the Norse god Ing (Yngvi) and ‘fríðr’, meaning beautiful, fair.
  • Ingolf – Combines the name of the Norse god Ing (Yngvi) with ‘ulfr’, meaning wolf, possibly implying a fierce protector.
  • Ingar – A variant of Ingvar, where ‘arr’ means warrior, emphasizing martial skill.
  • Ingeborg – Joins ‘Ing’, the name of a Norse god, with ‘bjǫrg’, meaning protection or safety.
  • Ingemar – Composed of ‘Ing’, the Norse god’s name, and ‘marr’, meaning famous, suggesting a renowned figure.
  • Ingfrid – Combines ‘Ing’, referring to the Norse god, with ‘fríðr’, meaning beautiful or beloved.
  • Ingvild – Merges ‘Ing’, the Norse god’s name, with ‘wild’, meaning battle, possibly denoting a fierce fighter.
  • Ida – Possibly derived from the Old Norse word ‘íð’, meaning work or labor.
  • Ingegerd – Combines ‘Ing’, the name of a Norse god, with ‘gerðr’, meaning enclosure or protection.
  • Ingvald – A name that brings together ‘Ing’ and ‘valdr’, meaning ruler or power, indicating a strong leader.
  • Ingebjørg – Similar to Ingeborg, it joins ‘Ing’ with ‘bjǫrg’, meaning protection.
  • Ivarr – An older form of Ivar, emphasizing the archer or warrior aspect.
  • Ingemund – Combines ‘Ing’, the Norse god’s name, with ‘mundr’, meaning protection.
  • Ingulv – Joins ‘Ing’ with ‘ulfr’, meaning wolf, suggesting a connection to the deity and the animal’s attributes.
  • Ingvor – Merges ‘Ing’ with ‘arr’, meaning warrior, highlighting a fighting spirit.
  • Idunn – In Norse mythology, Idunn is the goddess of youth and rejuvenation, often associated with apples.
  • Inger – A Scandinavian name derived from ‘Ing’, the name of the Norse god, and possibly ‘geirr’, meaning spear.
  • Ingjald – Combines ‘Ing’ with ‘jald’, which could be related to ‘valdr’, meaning ruler or power.
  • Istein – A name that may incorporate ‘Ing’ and ‘steinn’, meaning stone, symbolizing strength.
  • Inghild – Joins ‘Ing’ with ‘hildr’, meaning battle or war, often used for female warriors.
  • Ingunn – Combines ‘Ing’ with ‘gunnr’, meaning war or battle.
  • Ingulf – Merges ‘Ing’ with ‘ulfr’, meaning wolf, indicating a connection with the animal’s qualities.
  • Ingøy – Likely a modern name combining ‘Ing’ with ‘øy’, meaning island, possibly referring to a place sacred to the god Ing.
  • Ingeleiv – A name that might join ‘Ing’ with ‘leifr’, meaning heir or descendant.
  • Ingvard – Combines ‘Ing’ with ‘vardr’, meaning guardian, suggesting a protective role.
  • Ingmar – A variant of Ingemar, emphasizing fame or renown associated with the god Ing.
  • Ingvil – Merges ‘Ing’ with an element that could mean will or desire.
  • Ingvaldr – Another form of Ingvald, emphasizing the rule or power aspect.
  • Ingbert – Combines ‘Ing’ with ‘bjart’, meaning bright or illustrious.
  • Ingerid – Joins ‘Ing’ with ‘fríðr’, meaning beautiful, possibly denoting a beloved person.
  • Ingevald – A variant of Ingvald, focusing on the leadership or ruling qualities.
  • Ingjerd – Merges ‘Ing’ with ‘gerðr’, meaning enclosure, possibly indicating a person who is protective.
  • Ingthor – Combines ‘Ing’ with ‘Thor’, another Norse god, suggesting a powerful warrior.
  • Ingøyar – Likely a variant of Ingøy, referring to an island connected to the god Ing.
  • Ingunnar – A form of Ingunn, emphasizing the war or battle aspect.
  • Ingvell – A modern name, possibly combining ‘Ing’ with elements meaning strength or power.
  • Ingwar – Another variant of Ingvar, focusing on the warrior aspect.
  • Ige – Possibly a shortened form of a name beginning with ‘Ing-‘, related to the Norse god.
  • Igrim – A name of uncertain meaning, potentially related to Norse elements involving protection or fierceness.
  • Igot – A name that may derive from Old Norse elements, but its specific meaning is unclear.
  • Ingir – Likely a shortened form of a name beginning with ‘Ing-‘, associated with the deity.
  • Ildri – A name that could be related to ‘eldr’, meaning fire, suggesting a fiery personality or spirit.
  • Imsigul – A unique name with unclear origins, possibly combining Norse elements for a specific attribute or characteristic.
  • Ingri – A variant of Inger, focusing on the spear aspect if related to ‘geirr’.
  • Ivaldi – In Norse mythology, Ivaldi is a dwarf who is the father of many skilled sons who crafted precious items for the gods.
  • Ingvif – A modern name, likely combining ‘Ing’ with elements denoting strength or war.
  • Ingunar – Another form of Ingunn, again emphasizing the war or battle connotation.

J

viking names Jtart with I

  • Jafnar – Possibly a variant of “Jafnar,” relating to the Old Norse concept of a “yawner” or “gap.”
  • Jarl – Means “earl” or “chieftain,” a high-ranking title among Norsemen.
  • Jormund – A name that may be derived from elements meaning “horse” and “protection.”
  • Jorund – Possibly a variant of “Jorundr,” a name combining “horse” and “tree” to signify strength.
  • Jostein – Combines “horse” and “stone,” suggesting steadfastness.
  • Jorunn – A feminine name from Old Norse, meaning “horse love.”
  • Jarleif – Combines “earl” with “heir” or “descendant.”
  • Jarnskeggi – Means “iron beard,” indicating a person with a strong or notable beard.
  • Jarnauga – Could translate to “iron eyes,” suggesting keen sight or a steely gaze.
  • Jarngrimr – “Iron mask” or “fierce,” denoting a stern warrior.
  • Jarngerd – A name that might mean “iron enclosure,” signifying protection.
  • Jarlbrand – Combines “earl” with “sword” or “fire,” indicating a noble warrior.
  • Jormungandr – The name of the Midgard Serpent in Norse mythology, a giant sea serpent.
  • Jorleik – A name that might mean “play of horses,” denoting a horse lover or rider.
  • Jarnheid – Could mean “bright as iron,” suggesting a shining or notable presence.
  • Jorvar – A name that could mean “horse guardian.”
  • Jolgeir – Likely means “spear of Yule,” referring to the Norse celebration of midwinter.
  • Jolmod – Possibly means “courage of Yule,” signifying bravery during the Yule season.
  • Jolfred – “Peace of Yule,” suggesting a person born or associated with Yule-time peace.
  • Jolmund – “Protection of Yule,” denoting someone who safeguards the Yule festivities.
  • Jolstein – “Rock of Yule,” which could symbolize strength during the Yule season.
  • Jorbrand – A name combining “horse” and “sword,” indicating a warrior on horseback.
  • Jordis – A feminine name meaning “horse goddess” or “earth goddess.”
  • Jorgunnr – A name that may mean “horse power” or “warrior power.”
  • Jorulf – Combines “horse” with “wolf,” suggesting a fierce and loyal nature.
  • Jorveig – A feminine name meaning “horse strength” or “strong as a horse.”
  • Jorvor – Could mean “serious about horses,” indicating a person with a strong connection to horses.
  • Jostur – A name that could mean “horse battle” or “stallion.”
  • Jotunheim – Refers to the realm of the giants in Norse mythology.
  • Jotnar – The Norse giants, often in conflict with the gods.
  • Jokul – Means “glacier” or “ice mountain,” denoting a cold and imposing figure.
  • Jokulf – A variant of “Jokul,” possibly meaning “little glacier” or “son of a glacier.”
  • Jokull – Another variant of “Jokul,” with the same meaning of “glacier.”
  • Jokum – A diminutive form of “Jokul,” possibly meaning “little ice mountain.”
  • Jonmund – Combines “Jon” (a variant of John) with “protection.”
  • Jonulf – A name that may combine “Jon” with “wolf,” suggesting a fierce protector.
  • Jorberg – Means “horse mountain” or “mountain of the earl.”
  • Jorek – Could mean “horse power” or “strong horse.”
  • Jorend – A name that may mean “horse peace” or “peaceful rider.”
  • Jorengard – Combines “horse” with “enclosure,” suggesting a place for horses.
  • Jorfinn – A name that could combine “horse” or “good” with “Finn,” possibly referring to a person of Finnish descent.
  • Jorgrim – Means “fierce” or “grim” in relation to horses.
  • Jorghild – A name meaning “horse battle” or “protected by horses.”
  • Jorhal – Could mean “rock of horses,” indicating a steadfast person.
  • Jorik – A diminutive of “Jor-,” related to horses, combined with a suffix that could mean “ruler.”
  • Jorleif – Already mentioned above.
  • Jormun – A variant of “Jormund,” relating to horse protection.
  • Jornar – Possibly a variant of “Jorn,” meaning “farmer” or “earth-worker,” with a suffix that could imply a warrior or person.
 

K

viking names Jtart with K

  • Kári – Often associated with the Old Norse meaning “wind”.
  • Ketill – A name meaning “cauldron” or “helmet”, denoting strength.
  • Knut – Means “knot”, signifying tightness or complexity.
  • Kolbeinn – Derived from Old Norse elements meaning “black” and “bear”.
  • Kolbrún – A name combining “coal” (implying dark) and “eyebrow” or “edge”.
  • Kolfinna – Combines elements meaning “coal” and “Finn” (a person from Finland).
  • Kolgrímr – Means “masked” or “covered”, potentially in a mysterious sense.
  • Kolr – A simple name possibly meaning “charcoal”, signifying darkness.
  • Konráð – Derives from elements meaning “bold counsel” or “wise advisor”.
  • Konstantin – A Norse version of the name Constantine, meaning “constant” or “steadfast”.
  • Kormákr – Combines elements meaning “cormorant” (a type of bird) and “mask”.
  • Kraka – A name possibly meaning “crow”, associated with intelligence.
  • Krákr – A variant of Kraka, also likely meaning “crow”.
  • Kjartan – Means “glorious” or “bright”, signifying radiance.
  • Kjeld – Possibly derived from a word meaning “kettle”, implying robustness.
  • Kjerulf – A name meaning “circle wolf”, perhaps signifying a protector.
  • Kjotvi – A name that might mean “chubby”, implying prosperity.
  • Klængur – Likely derived from a word meaning “slender” or “weak”.
  • Knarri – Possibly means “small ship”, indicating a connection to the sea.
  • Knútr – Another form of Knut, implying complexity or tightness.
  • Kolbjorn – Combines “coal” and “bear”, indicating strength or darkness.
  • Kolgot – A name that could mean “coal Goth”, implying a dark warrior.
  • Kolli – Possibly a diminutive form of names beginning with “Kol-“.
  • Kollr – Another variant of names starting with “Kol-“, indicating darkness.
  • Kolskegg – Means “black beard”, signifying a dark-haired individual.
  • Kolthar – A unique name, possibly combining “coal” with a strength element.
  • Kori – A name of uncertain meaning, possibly a short form of a compound name.
  • Kormak – A variant of Kormákr, combining “cormorant” and “mask”.
  • Korpulfr – Means “raven wolf”, symbolizing a powerful or mystical figure.
  • Korrir – A lesser-known name, possibly derived from a word meaning “curl”.
  • Kraki – A variant of Kraka, likely signifying a crow or raven.
  • Kran – A short and strong name, its meaning is not well-documented.
  • Krepphendi – A unique name, possibly meaning “tight hand” or “grip”.
  • Kriemhild – A name meaning “mask battle”, implying a warrior’s strength.
  • Kristr – A Norse form of “Christ”, denoting religious significance.
  • Krókr – Means “hook”, possibly indicating a bent or curved shape.
  • Krummi – Likely derived from a word meaning “crooked” or “bent”.
  • Kuggi – A name of uncertain origin, possibly signifying a small boat.
  • Kul – A simple name likely meaning “coal”, implying darkness.
  • Kulr – Similar to Kul, also implying darkness or a coal-black color.
  • Kunarr – A name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to knowledge.
  • Kund – A rare name, its meaning is not well-documented.
  • Kurl – A name that could be derived from a word meaning “curly”.
  • Kurt – Possibly a Norse form of Kurtis, meaning “courteous”.
  • Kusti – A lesser-known name, its meaning is not well-documented.

L

viking names Jtart with L

  • Lagertha – A legendary Viking shieldmaiden and the first wife of the famous Viking Ragnar Lothbrok, according to the “Gesta Danorum”.
  • Lailoken – A name possibly related to a mythic Scottish madman and prophet, sometimes associated with Merlin.
  • Landi – Could be related to Old Norse, meaning a landowner or a farmer.
  • Langbard – A name that may be connected to the Lombards, a Germanic people who ruled parts of Italy.
  • Langfeðgar – Likely a compound Old Norse name meaning “long fathers,” possibly indicating lineage or ancestry.
  • Languar – Possibly derived from Old Norse, meaning “long spear,” a fitting name for a warrior.
  • Lappi – A name referring to a person from Lapland, a region in the far north of Scandinavia.
  • Larthi – This name does not have a clear meaning but may be of Old Norse origin.
  • Lassi – A diminutive form of Lasse, itself a Scandinavian form of Laurence, meaning “from Laurentum.”
  • Lathe – Could be a variant of “hlatha,” an Old Norse word for a barn or a storehouse.
  • Laufey – In Norse mythology, Laufey is the mother of Loki, the trickster god.
  • Laugar – Could be related to the Old Norse word for “baths” or “hot springs.”
  • Laukr – An Old Norse name possibly meaning “leek,” which was a common plant and symbol in the Viking Age.
  • Leidolf – A Norse name meaning “descendant of the people,” or “heir of the people.”
  • Leif – A well-known Viking name meaning “descendant” or “heir,” famously borne by Leif Erikson, the explorer.
  • Leikn – This name does not have a well-documented meaning but is likely of Old Norse origin.
  • Leikny – A Norse female name that is not well-documented but may mean “play” or “sport.”
  • Lendmann – An Old Norse term for a feudal retainer, equivalent to a liege man.
  • Lennart – A Scandinavian form of Leonard, meaning “lion strength.”
  • Leod – An Old English name meaning “people” or “nation,” common in the Viking Age in areas of English Viking settlement.
  • Leofdag – An Old English name meaning “beloved day,” potentially used in areas of Viking influence.
  • Leofric – An Old English name meaning “beloved ruler,” which may have been used in the Danelaw.
  • Leofwine – An Old English name meaning “dear friend,” possibly used in areas influenced by Norse culture.
  • Leot – This name does not have a clear meaning but may be related to Old Norse or Old English elements.
  • Lif – An Old Norse name meaning “life,” a common element in female Viking names.
  • Lifing – A name that could be related to “Lif,” meaning “life,” with the suffix “-ing” denoting descent or belonging.
  • Lifolf – A Norse name combining “life” with “wolf,” possibly meaning “wolf of life” or “protector of life.”
  • Lilla – A name of uncertain origin, possibly related to Old Norse or Old English with a diminutive or affectionate connotation.
  • Lindi – A Norse name that could be derived from “lind,” meaning “linden tree” or “shield.”
  • Linni – Likely a diminutive form of a Norse name, possibly related to “lind” for “linden tree.”
  • Ljot – An Old Norse name meaning “ugly,” not necessarily negative, could imply a fearsome warrior.
  • Ljufa – A Norse name meaning “beloved” or “dear,” often found in compound names.
  • Ljufu – A variation of Ljufa, also meaning “beloved” or “dear” in Old Norse.
  • Lodbrok – A variant of Lothbrok, which means “hairy breeches” and is associated with the legendary Viking Ragnar Lothbrok.
  • Lodin – A Norse name with uncertain meaning, possibly related to “Lodur,” a name sometimes associated with the god Loki.
  • Lodmund – A Norse name that combines “lod” (uncertain meaning) with “mund” meaning “protection.”
  • Loðbrók – Another variant of Lothbrok, referring to the legendary Viking Ragnar.
  • Lofar – A Norse name that may mean “praise” or “reputation,” from the Old Norse word “lof.”
  • Lofdung – A Norse name, potentially meaning “praised” or “exalted one,” from “lof” and “dung.”
  • Lofnheid – A compound Norse name meaning “high praise” or “esteemed,” from “lof” and “heid.”
  • Logi – In Norse mythology, Logi is a fire giant, a figure associated with flame and possibly consumption.
  • Lothbrok – The name of the semi-legendary Viking Ragnar Lothbrok, meaning “hairy breeches.”
  • Lotti – A name of uncertain origin, could be a diminutive form of a Norse or Germanic name.
  • Lufa – A Norse name that could be related to “love” or “leaf,” but the exact meaning is unclear.
  • Lukka – Possibly a Norse name meaning “lock” or “enclosure,” or a form of the name “Lucas.”
  • Lundi – An Old Norse name meaning “puffin,” a type of bird common in the North Atlantic.
  • Lunn – Likely a variation of Lundi, also meaning “puffin” in Old Norse.
  • Lyting – A Norse name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to “lithe” or “flexible.”
  • Lyubbi – A name that does not have a clear Norse origin and its meaning is not well-documented.
  • Lyulf – A Norse name possibly combining “lyu,” a variant of “love,” with “ulf” meaning “wolf.”

M

viking names Jtart with M

  • Magnus – A popular Scandinavian name meaning “great” or “powerful.”
  • Malmfrid – An Old Norse name possibly meaning “strong peace” or “strong protector.”
  • Malthe – Derived from the Old Danish name “Malti,” possibly meaning “ruler” or “power.”
  • Mardoll – Another name for the goddess Freyja in Norse mythology, meaning “shining over the sea.”
  • Marek – A name of Slavic origin meaning “warlike” or related to Mars, the Roman god of war.
  • Marger – Likely a variant of Margir, which could mean “great” or “vast” in Old Norse.
  • Marius – A Roman family name which may mean “male,” “manly,” or “of the sea.”
  • Markvard – An Old Norse name meaning “forest guardian” or “border guard.”
  • Marrok – A name with uncertain origins, possibly related to a legendary British knight who was turned into a werewolf.
  • Mathias – A variant of Matthias, derived from the Hebrew name Mattityahu, meaning “gift of Yahweh.”
  • Matilda – A Germanic name meaning “mighty in battle.”
  • Mattis – A Scandinavian diminutive of Matthew, meaning “gift of God.”
  • Maur – A short form of Maurus, meaning “dark-skinned” in Latin, often associated with St. Maurus.
  • Maxen – A Welsh form of the Roman name Maximus, meaning “greatest.”
  • Meino – Possibly a variant of Maino or Meinhard, Germanic names meaning “strength.”
  • Meistari – Derived from the Old Norse word “meistari,” meaning “master” or “expert.”
  • Meldun – An Old English name possibly meaning “from the powerful hill.”
  • Melkorka – An Old Irish name that found its way into Iceland, possibly meaning “servant of the church.”
  • Melrakki – Icelandic for “arctic fox,” used as a name.
  • Menja – One of the two giantesses who grind Aurnir’s mill in Norse mythology.
  • Merewald – An Old English name meaning “famous power.”
  • Merek – Likely a variation of Marek, meaning “warlike.”
  • Merete – A Danish and Norwegian form of Margaret, meaning “pearl.”
  • Merewen – An Old English name meaning “joy” or “delight” and “friend.”
  • Merilda – A name with uncertain meaning, possibly a variant of the Old English name Merewen.
  • Mette – A Danish and Norwegian diminutive of Margaret, meaning “pearl.”
  • Mezentius – A name from Roman mythology, Mezentius was an Etruscan king and an enemy of Aeneas.
  • Mia – A diminutive of Maria, which is derived from the Hebrew name Miryam, meaning “beloved” or “wished-for child.”
  • Milda – A Lithuanian goddess of love and freedom, also used as a given name.
  • Milja – A name of uncertain origin, possibly a Finnish form of Milia, meaning “gracious.”
  • Mimir – In Norse mythology, Mimir is the wise god of knowledge and wisdom.
  • Mirabel – Derived from Latin, meaning “wonderful” or “of wondrous beauty.”
  • Modig – Old Norse for “brave” or “courageous,” used as a name.
  • Moi – A name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to the Old Norse name Moir, meaning “dark-skinned.”
  • Moin – A name of uncertain origin, possibly related to Moi or a variant of Mohin, meaning “attractive.”
  • Mokkur – A name of uncertain meaning, could be related to Old Norse and the concept of darkness.
  • Mord – A name that might derive from Old English or Old Norse, meaning “murder” or “crime.”
  • Mordred – A character in Arthurian legend, often portrayed as King Arthur’s traitorous nephew.
  • Morgun – Old Norse for “morning.”
  • Mork – Possibly derived from the Old Norse word “myrkr,” meaning “darkness.”
  • Morten – A Scandinavian form of Martin, derived from Mars, the Roman god of war.
  • Mose – A variant of Moses, a biblical name meaning “delivered from the water.”
  • Mosti – A name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to Old Norse and signifying a bridge or a connection.
  • Motti – A name of uncertain origin, possibly a diminutive form of a longer name.
  • Moun – A name of uncertain meaning, could be a shortened form or variant of another name.
  • Muni – One of the horses that pull the Moon’s chariot in Norse mythology.
  • Munin – One of Odin’s ravens in Norse mythology, representing memory.
  • Myrkr – Old Norse for “darkness,” used as a name.
  • Myrra – Derived from the Greek for “myrrh,” a fragrant resin used in perfumes and incense.
  • Myrthe – A Dutch form of Myrtle, a name derived from the evergreen shrub known for its fragrant blossoms.

N

viking names Jtart with N

  • Njal – Often associated with the name “Njáll,” from the Icelandic saga “Njáls saga,” which means “giant.”
  • Njord – A name derived from the Norse god Njörðr, associated with sea, seafaring, wind, fishing, wealth, and crop fertility.
  • Nanna – In Norse mythology, Nanna is the wife of the god Baldr and is associated with love and grief.
  • Njorun – Possibly a variation of the name “Njörðr,” like Njord, but less common and not directly linked to a specific mythological figure.
  • Norn – Refers to the Norns in Norse mythology, who are female beings that determine the fate of gods and men.
  • Njola – A rare name that may be a variation of the Old Norse elements related to “night” or “to be hidden.”
  • Njolvor – An uncommon name that might be a compound of Old Norse elements, but its meaning is not clearly defined.
  • Njalmar – Likely a variant of “Hjalmar,” which means “helmeted warrior” in Old Norse.
  • Njala – A feminine name that may derive from the same roots as Njal, but its specific meaning is uncertain.
  • Njari – An unusual name that might be a derivative of Old Norse elements, with no well-known meaning.
  • Njorn – Another rare name that could be related to Norse elements, but its meaning is not clear.
  • Njold – This name does not have a well-established meaning and is not commonly recognized in the context of Norse names.
  • Njolin – A name with unclear origins and meaning, possibly a derivative of Norse elements.
  • Njori – Likely a diminutive or variation of “Njörðr,” similar to Njord, but less common.
  • Njordi – Another variant of “Njörðr,” echoing the association with the Norse god of the sea.
  • Njol – A unique name with no clear meaning, possibly related to the Old Norse word for “night.”
  • Njul – A name of uncertain origin and meaning, not widely recognized in Norse contexts.
  • Njurl – An uncommon name with no clear meaning, likely a modern creation or a derivative of Norse elements.
  • Njot – A name with no well-established meaning, possibly related to the Old Norse word for “enjoyment” or “use.”
  • Njotr – Similar to Njot, this name’s meaning is uncertain but could be connected to Old Norse language elements.
  • Njolfr – A name that may combine Old Norse elements, but its specific meaning is not well-defined.
  • Njotur – Like Njot and Njotr, the meaning of this name is unclear, possibly related to enjoyment or usage.
  • Njor – Likely another variant of “Njörðr,” similar to Njord, Njorun, and Njordi.
  • Njorf – A rare name that may be derived from Norse elements, but its meaning is not clearly established.
  • Njork – An uncommon name with no clear meaning, possibly a modern invention or a derivative of Norse elements.
  • Njort – A name with no well-known meaning, possibly related to the Old Norse language.
  • Njulfr – Likely a variant spelling of Njolfr, with no specific meaning attached to it.
  • Njurd – A unique name with no clear meaning, possibly a derivative of Norse elements.
  • Njurf – Similar to Njurd, this name’s origins and meaning are not well-defined.
  • Njurk – An uncommon name with an unclear meaning, possibly related to Norse elements.
  • Njurt – Another rare name with no established meaning, potentially derived from Norse language elements.
  • Njolv – A name with no clear meaning, possibly a variant of Njolvor or related to Old Norse elements.
  • Njolvi – Likely a variant of Njolv, with no specific meaning attached to it.
  • Njorvi – A rare name that may be a derivative of “Njörðr,” similar to Njord.
  • Njorfin – An uncommon name with no clear meaning, possibly related to Norse elements.
  • Njorun – Another variant of “Njörðr,” similar to Njord and Njorun, but less common.
  • Njolun – A name with no well-established meaning, potentially a derivative of Norse language elements.
  • Njorl – An uncommon name with an unclear meaning, possibly related to Norse elements.
  • Njurun – Likely a variant of Njorun, with no specific meaning attached to it.
  • Njurulf – A name that may combine Old Norse elements, but its specific meaning is not well-defined.
  • Njurdan – An unusual name with no clear meaning, possibly a modern invention or a derivative of Norse elements.
  • Njurik – A unique name with no established meaning, potentially derived from Norse language elements.
  • Njurin – Another rare name with an unclear meaning, possibly related to Norse elements.
  • Njuror – A name with no clear meaning, potentially a derivative of Norse language elements.
  • Njulf – Likely a variant of Njul, with no specific meaning attached to it.
  • Njulfar – An uncommon name that may be derived from Norse elements, but its meaning is not clearly established.
  • Njulvar – Similar to Njulfar, this name’s origins and meaning are not well-defined.

O

viking names Jtart with O

  • Odal – A name of Old Norse origin, possibly meaning “wealth” or “heritage.”
  • Olaf – Scandinavian name meaning “ancestor’s descendant,” often associated with Viking kings.
  • Oleg – A Norse name, possibly derived from Helgi, meaning “holy” or “blessed.”
  • Oleif – A variant of Olaf, with a similar meaning of “ancestor’s descendant.”
  • Olin – Possibly a shortened form of Olaf or related to the Old Norse word for “ancestor.”
  • Olvir – An Old Norse name meaning “all wise” or “very wise.”
  • Onar – A Norse name that may mean “eager” or “excited.”
  • Orin – A name of uncertain origin, possibly related to the Old Norse word for “excitement” or “noise.”
  • Orm – Derived from the Old Norse word for “dragon” or “serpent.”
  • Orvar – Means “arrow” in Old Norse, suggesting a skilled archer.
  • Osborn – An Old Norse name meaning “god bear” or “divine warrior.”
  • Oskar – A name that means “god’s spear” or “spear of the gods.”
  • Osric – A name of Old English origin, meaning “divine ruler.”
  • Oswin – An Old English name meaning “god friend” or “friend of God.”
  • Ottar – An Old Norse name meaning “fearless warrior.”
  • Ove – A name of uncertain origin, possibly related to Old Norse meaning “edge of a sword.”
  • Oyvind – A Norse name meaning “happy warrior” or “island wind.”
  • Odd – An Old Norse name meaning “point of a weapon,” often associated with sharpness.
  • Oddgeir – Means “spear of Odd,” combining the name Odd with “geir,” meaning spear.
  • Oddleif – A combination of “Odd” and “leif,” meaning “heir of the point of a weapon.”
  • Oddvar – Means “guardian of the point of a weapon,” with “var” signifying “guardian.”
  • Ogmund – An Old Norse name meaning “terror protection” or “protector against fear.”
  • Olav – A variant of Olaf, with the same meaning “ancestor’s descendant.”
  • Olbjorn – A name meaning “bear of the ancestors,” combining “ancestor” with “bear.”
  • Olek – A diminutive of Oleg, with the same meaning of “holy” or “blessed.”
  • Olev – Possibly a variant of Olaf, meaning “ancestor’s descendant.”
  • Olger – A Norse name meaning “spear of the ancestors.”
  • Olmod – An Old Norse name meaning “furious” or “wrathful.”
  • Olof – Another variant of Olaf, meaning “ancestor’s descendant.”
  • Olson – A patronymic surname meaning “son of Olaf.”
  • Omund – A Norse name meaning “protection” or “protector.”
  • Onund – A name that may mean “ancestor’s descendant,” similar to Olaf.
  • Orjan – A Scandinavian name derived from the Old Norse Örjan, meaning “farmer.”
  • Orkel – A Norse name meaning “sacrificial cauldron,” which may imply a religious role.
  • Orlyg – An Old Norse name possibly meaning “eagle” or “descendant.”
  • Ormod – Means “sad,” “depressed,” or “heavy-hearted” in Old Norse.
  • Ormsvend – A combination of “Orm” (serpent) and “vend,” meaning friend, so “friend of the serpent.”
  • Orri – A Norse name that could mean “black grouse,” a type of bird.
  • Orstein – A name meaning “stone of the gods” or “divine stone.”
  • Orvar-Odd – A legendary hero whose name means “arrow’s point Odd.”
  • Osbert – An Old English name meaning “divinely bright.”
  • Osvald – A Norse name meaning “god power” or “divine power.”
  • Oswiu – An Old English name, possibly meaning “temple strength” or “strength of God.”
  • Othere – An Old Norse name meaning “madness,” “fury,” or “terrifying.”
  • Otkel – A Norse name that may mean “sacrificial cauldron” like Orkel.
  • Otrygg – Means “not trustworthy” or “unfaithful” in Old Norse.
  • Ottokar – A name of German origin meaning “wealthy and blessed.”
  • Over – A name of uncertain origin and meaning, possibly related to “over” or “above” in English.
  • Oystein – A Norse name meaning “island stone” or “lucky stone.”
  • Ozur – An Old Norse name that could mean “god’s spear,” similar to Oskar.

P

viking names Jtart with P

  • Páll – This is a Norse form of the name Paul, meaning “small” or “humble”.
  • Pálmundr – This name combines “pálmr” (palm tree) and “mundr” (protection), possibly meaning “protector with the palm (as a symbol of peace).”
  • Patrek – A variation of Patrick, it likely denotes “nobleman” or refers to St. Patrick.
  • Peder – The Scandinavian form of Peter, meaning “rock” or “stone.”
  • Pelles – Possibly a variant of Pelle, a diminutive of Per, the Scandinavian form of Peter.
  • Penti – This name’s meaning is not clear, but it may be a diminutive or variation of a name starting with “Pen-.”
  • Per – Short form of Peter in Scandinavian languages, meaning “rock.”
  • Peres – Likely a variant of Per, meaning “rock” or “stone.”
  • Peri – This could be another diminutive or variation of Per, with the same meaning.
  • Perki – Possibly a diminutive form of a name beginning with “Perk,” but its specific meaning is unclear.
  • Permund – Combines “Per” (rock) with “mund” (protection), suggesting “protector like a rock.”
  • Pernik – The meaning is obscure, potentially a variant of a Norse name with “Per.”
  • Pernir – Likely a Norse name, but the meaning is not clear; could be related to “Per.”
  • Perse – This could be a variation of Per, or possibly related to the Greek name Perseus.
  • Persi – Possibly a diminutive or variant of Per, or related to the ancient region of Persia.
  • Perski – This name’s meaning is uncertain, but it could be a variation of Per or relate to Persia.
  • Pertak – The meaning of this name is not clear; it may be a Norse name incorporating “Per.”
  • Pertar – Likely a variant of Per, combined with a suffix “-tar,” but the specific meaning is unknown.
  • Pertik – May be a diminutive or variation of a name starting with “Pert,” meaning is unclear.
  • Pertlak – The meaning is uncertain, possibly a Norse name with the element “Per.”
  • Pertold – This name could combine “Per” with “old,” but its specific meaning is not clear.
  • Pertolv – May be a Norse name combining “Per” with “olv,” possibly meaning “ancestor” or “descendant.”
  • Pertor – This name’s meaning is uncertain; could be a variant of Per with a Norse suffix.
  • Pertulf – Likely a Norse name, combining “Per” with “tulf,” but the specific meaning is not well-documented.
  • Pertur – Could be a variation of Per with a Norse suffix, meaning unknown.
  • Pesar – The meaning of this name is not clear; it may be a Norse name involving “Per.”
  • Petak – Possibly a diminutive or variation of Peter, meaning “rock.”
  • Peter – The English form of the Greek name Petros, meaning “rock” or “stone.”
  • Peti – Likely a diminutive of Peter, meaning “little rock” or “small stone.”
  • Petki – This name’s meaning is uncertain, but it could be a variation of Peter.
  • Petr – Slavic form of Peter, meaning “rock” or “stone.”
  • Petrik – A diminutive form of Peter, meaning “little rock” or “small stone.”
  • Petrum – Likely a Latinized form of Peter, meaning “rock” or “stone.”
  • Petter – Scandinavian form of Peter, meaning “rock” or “stone.”
  • Pettur – Another variant of Peter, with the same meaning of “rock.”
  • Peve – The meaning of this name is not clear, and it does not have a readily identifiable Norse origin.
  • Pexi – This name’s meaning is uncertain, with no clear origin from Norse or other Scandinavian languages.
  • Peyr – Likely a variant of Per or Peter, meaning “rock.”
  • Peyre – Another variant of Per or Peter, with the same meaning of “rock.”
  • Peyvi – The meaning and origin of this name are not clear, potentially a variation of a Norse name.
  • Pilt – This term means “boy” or “lad” in some Scandinavian languages.
  • Pin – The meaning is obscure, but it may be a diminutive or nickname for a longer name.
  • Pinni – Possibly a diminutive form, but the exact meaning and origin are unclear.
  • Pior – The meaning of this name is not well-documented, and it may be a variant of a Norse or Slavic name.
  • Piori – Likely a variant or diminutive of Pior, but the specific meaning is unknown.
  • Pios – The origin and meaning of this name are uncertain, possibly a variant of a Norse name.
  • Pir – This name’s meaning is not clear; it may be a short form or diminutive of a longer name.
  • Piri – Potentially a diminutive or variation of Pir, but the meaning is not well-established.
  • Piro – The meaning and origin are not clear; it may be a variant or diminutive of a Norse name.

Q

viking names Jtart with Q

While names beginning with “Q” are not typical for historical Viking names, as the letter “Q” was not used in Old Norse., we’ve crafted a quirky collection of Viking-esque names that playfully begin with this letter. These names, while historically anachronistic, are designed to capture the spirit and strength of the legendary Norsemen.

  • Qalvur – A name that echoes the Norse sound, perhaps meaning “calf’s strength.”
  • Qarald – Suggestive of a powerful leader, akin to the Norse name “Harald.”
  • Qarik – Resembling the name “Eiríkr,” which means “eternal ruler.”
  • Qarsten – A Norse-sounding twist on “Karsten,” which is related to “Christian.”
  • Qasvald – Implies “God’s power,” reminiscent of the Old Norse name “Ásvaldr.”
  • Qein – Evokes the Norse tradition, perhaps meaning “one warrior,” similar to “Einar.”
  • Qeinar – A variant of “Einar,” suggesting a solitary or warrior-like figure.
  • Qellulfr – Combines “ketill” (helmet or cauldron) and “ulfr” (wolf), indicating a fierce protector.
  • Qelrik – Sounds like a blend of “ketill” and “rik,” meaning “ruler with the strength of a cauldron.”
  • Qenarik – Suggests a wise ruler, akin to the Norse “Eiríkr.”
  • Qerik – Another twist on “Eiríkr,” with a strong, commanding sound.
  • Qermund – Implies a protector or defender, similar to “Gudmundr” (protection of God).
  • Qervald – Echoes the strength of Thor, akin to “Thorvaldr” (Thor’s ruler).
  • Qestein – Resembles “Eysteinn,” meaning “lucky stone.”
  • Qetil – Reflects the common Norse name “Ketill,” meaning “helmet” or “cauldron.”
  • Qetill – A variation of “Qetil,” maintaining the meaning of “helmet” or “cauldron.”
  • Qeystein – Suggestive of “Eysteinn,” indicating luck or fortune.
  • Qiknar – Evokes the image of a brave warrior, perhaps akin to “Ingvarr.”
  • Qikulfr – Combines “quick” and “ulfr” (wolf), suggesting a swift and fierce character.
  • Qilvi – Resembles “Silvi,” which could be a Norse name meaning “from the forest.”
  • Qimund – Implies a divine protector, similar to “Gudmundr.”
  • Qinulf – Suggests a kinship with wolves, echoing the Norse “Úlf.”
  • Qiolfr – A name that implies a connection with wolves, akin to “Úlfr.”
  • Qiorn – Evokes the strength of a bear, similar to “Bjǫrn.”
  • Qirik – Another variant of the ruler name “Eiríkr.”
  • Qistin – Suggests a follower of Christ, similar to “Kristinn.”
  • Qithric – Implies Thor’s strength, akin to “Þóriríkr.”
  • Qjorn – A name that suggests the might of a bear, akin to “Bjǫrn.”
  • Qjulfr – Combines “jul” (Yule) and “ulfr” (wolf), indicating a wolf associated with midwinter.
  • Qleif – Suggests a cliff or a steep mountain, akin to “Klæif.”
  • Qmund – Implies a protector or a guardian, similar to “Gudmundr.”
  • Qnar – A strong, short name that could be related to “Knarr,” a type of Viking ship.
  • Qnute – Reflects the Norse name “Knutr,” meaning “knot” or “bold.”
  • Qolaf – A twist on “Olaf,” suggesting an ancestral heritage.
  • Qolbjorn – Combines “kol” (coal) and “bjorn” (bear), indicating a dark bear.
  • Qolleif – Suggests a descendant of “Leifr,” with a strong heritage.
  • Qolvir – Implies a connection with wolves or a wolf-like spirit.
  • Qorald – A strong leader’s name, akin to “Haraldr.”
  • Qorik – Another variant of the eternal ruler name “Eiríkr.”
  • Qormund – Suggests a mind or spirit that is well-protected.
  • Qorstein – Implies the strength and stability of stone, akin to “Þorsteinn” (Thor’s stone).
  • Qorten – A unique Norse-sounding name that could imply strength or masculinity.
  • Qostein – Reflects the solidity of “Steinn,” meaning “stone.”
  • Qothar – Suggests a warrior or a leader, echoing the Norse “Gothar.”
  • Quarn – A name that implies strength and stability.
  • Quein – Suggests a unique character, potentially related to “Ketill.”
  • Querik – Another twist on the ruler name “Eiríkr.”
  • Qulvur – Implies a guardian wolf, echoing the Norse “ulfr.”
  • Qunbjorn – Combines “kun” (kin) and “bjorn” (bear), suggesting a bear of the family.

R

viking names Jtart with R

  • Ragnar – A Scandinavian name possibly meaning “warrior” or “judgment.”
  • Ragnhild – A name of Old Norse origin meaning “battle counsel.”
  • Ragnor – A variant of Ragnar, which may mean “warrior” or “judgment.”
  • Ragnvald – An Old Norse name meaning “strong power” or “ruler’s advice.”
  • Ranveig – Derived from Old Norse, meaning “house of raven” or “raven’s strength.”
  • Rasmus – A Scandinavian form of Erasmus, meaning “beloved” or “desired.”
  • Reidar – Means “warrior who fights with God” in Old Norse.
  • Reine – A name of Nordic origin, possibly a variant of Reynir, meaning “to advise” or “to rule.”
  • Regin – In Norse mythology, Regin was a wise and magical being.
  • Regnar – A variant spelling of Ragnar, related to “warrior” or “judgment.”
  • Reidun – From Old Norse, meaning “lovely in the nest” or “lovely to advise.”
  • Rikard – The Scandinavian form of Richard, meaning “strong ruler.”
  • Rolf – Derived from the Old Norse name Hrolfr, meaning “famous wolf.”
  • Rolv – A variant of Rolf, also meaning “famous wolf.”
  • Ronja – Possibly derived from Veronica or a name created by Swedish author Astrid Lindgren for her book “Ronja Rövardotter.”
  • Roskva – A figure in Norse mythology, meaning “the quick one.”
  • Runa – Of Old Norse origin meaning “secret lore.”
  • Rune – Means “secret” in Old Norse, symbolizing the runic alphabets with mystical meanings.
  • Runolf – A combination of the Old Norse elements for “rune” and “wolf.”
  • Rurik – A Varangian name that may mean “famous ruler.”
  • Ragnfrid – An Old Norse name meaning “beautiful” or “peaceful advice.”
  • Randi – A diminutive of Miranda or a Norse name meaning “shield” or “rim.”
  • Randulf – Old Norse origin, meaning “shield wolf.”
  • Rane – A variant form of Rane, meaning “deciding warrior.”
  • Rangvald – A variant of Ragnvald, meaning “strong power” or “ruler’s advice.”
  • Ranulf – A Norse name meaning “shield wolf.”
  • Rask – Derived from Old Norse, meaning “quick” or “swift.”
  • Ravn – Meaning “raven” in Old Norse, symbolizing wisdom and knowledge.
  • Rayner – An Old Norse name meaning “warrior of judgment.”
  • Refil – A Norse name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to “sail” or “wandering.”
  • Regnald – A variant of Reynold, meaning “ruler’s advisor.”
  • Reidulf – A combination of Old Norse words for “nest” and “wolf.”
  • Reimar – A name of Germanic origin, meaning “famous advice.”
  • Reinald – A variant of Reynold, meaning “ruler’s advisor.”
  • Reineke – A diminutive form of names beginning with “Rein,” meaning “advice” or “counsel.”
  • Reinhard – A name meaning “brave counsel,” from Germanic elements.
  • Reinhold – Means “wise protector” from Old Norse elements.
  • Renfred – An Old Norse name meaning “peaceful advice.”
  • Renke – A Frisian short form of names beginning with “Ragin,” meaning “advice.”
  • Renne – A name of uncertain origin, possibly related to “reindeer” or a variant of Renke.
  • Reynir – An Old Norse name meaning “to advise” or “to rule.”
  • Rikke – A Danish and Norwegian diminutive of Frederikke or Ulrikke.
  • Rimbert – An Old Norse name, possibly meaning “ring bright.”
  • Rind – A giantess in Norse mythology, possibly meaning “bark of a tree” or “crust.”
  • Ring – A Scandinavian name meaning “ring,” possibly denoting a circular pledge or unity.
  • Risti – A name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to “Christ” or “cross.”
  • Ristin – A variant of Risti, also possibly related to “Christ” or “cross.”
  • Roald – A name meaning “famous ruler,” from Old Norse elements.
  • Rodgeir – A variant of Roger, meaning “famous spear” from Germanic elements.
  • Rodulf – A variant of Rudolf, meaning “famous wolf.”

S

viking names Jtart with S

  • Sigurd – A hero in Norse mythology, Sigurd is best known for slaying the dragon Fafnir.
  • Sven – Derived from the Old Norse name Sveinn, which means “boy” or “young man.”
  • Snorri – A famous Icelandic historian and poet, Snorri Sturluson, authored the Prose Edda.
  • Solveig – A name of Old Norse origin, meaning “strong house” or “daughter of the sun.”
  • Skadi – A giantess and goddess associated with bowhunting, skiing, winter, and mountains in Norse mythology.
  • Sten – A Scandinavian name meaning “stone,” symbolizing strength and stability.
  • Sigfrid – A variant of Sigurd, meaning “victory” and “peace.”
  • Sigmund – A legendary hero in Norse sagas, Sigmund means “victory protection.”
  • Sigbjorn – Combines “victory” with “bear,” suggesting the strength of a bear.
  • Stein – A name meaning “stone” in Old Norse, related to the English word “stone.”
  • Sif – The wife of the Norse god Thor, known for her golden hair.
  • Sigvald – A name meaning “ruler’s victory” or “victory power.”
  • Solvi – A name derived from Old Norse elements meaning “sun” and “strength.”
  • Stig – Means “path” or “wanderer” in Old Norse.
  • Siggeir – A name that can be associated with “victory” and “spear.”
  • Svana – A female name possibly meaning “swan.”
  • Svein – Another form of Sven, meaning “boy” or “young warrior.”
  • Sigurdar – A variation of Sigurd, bearing the same association with the dragon-slaying hero.
  • Sigyn – The loyal wife of the trickster god Loki in Norse mythology.
  • Skuli – A name that can mean “protection” in Old Norse.
  • Sigmar – A combination of “victory” and “famous.”
  • Svanhild – A name meaning “swan battle” in Old Norse.
  • Sverre – An Old Norse name meaning “wild” or “swinging.”
  • Sigrid – A female name meaning “beautiful victory.”
  • Storm – A name reflecting the natural phenomenon, symbolizing power and force.
  • Styrkar – Derived from Old Norse elements meaning “strength” and “strength.”
  • Svend – A variant of Sven, meaning “young man” or “servant.”
  • Sigga – A diminutive form of names beginning with the Old Norse element “sigr” meaning “victory.”
  • Skjold – A name meaning “shield,” indicating protection.
  • Svipdag – From Old Norse elements meaning “sudden” and “day,” possibly a reference to unexpected fortune or change.
  • Sigfast – Combining “victory” with “fastened” or “firm.”
  • Svan – A male name that might be related to “swan” or a warrior’s grace.
  • Sunniva – Derived from Old English elements meaning “sun gift.”
  • Skeggi – Means “bearded one” in Old Norse.
  • Sturla – A name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to a family of medieval Icelandic chieftains and writers.
  • Sigmarr – A variation of Sigmund, meaning “famous victory.”
  • Sighvat – A name composed of elements meaning “victory” and “threat.”
  • Siv – The wife of Thor in Norse mythology, possibly meaning “bride” or “kinship.”
  • Skarphedin – A name meaning “sharp blade” in Old Norse.
  • Svart – Means “black” in Old Norse, often referring to someone with dark features.
  • Sigleif – Combines “victory” with “heir” or “descendant.”
  • Sighild – A name that can be associated with “victory” and “battle.”
  • Stenar – A variation of Sten, meaning “stone.”
  • Sigrun – A name meaning “victory rune” in Old Norse, symbolizing a secret of victory.
  • Skogul – One of the Valkyries in Norse mythology, associated with battle.
  • Snotra – A Norse goddess associated with wisdom and virtue.
  • Sigtrygg – A name meaning “true victory” in Old Norse.
  • Sveinn – Another variant of Sven, emphasizing the meaning of “boy” or “servant.”
  • Sigvor – A female name meaning “victory” and “careful.”
  • Styrbjorn – A name meaning “battle bear,” implying the strength and ferocity of a bear in battle.

T

viking names Jtart with T

  • Thormund – A name meaning “Thor’s protection,” reflecting the Norse god’s influence.
  • Thorvald – This name means “Thor’s ruler,” indicating a connection to the god of thunder.
  • Tyra – A feminine name possibly derived from the Norse god Tyr, associated with law and heroic glory.
  • Thorgest – A variation of “Thorgest,” suggesting “Thor’s guest” or one under Thor’s protection.
  • Torleif – Meaning “Thor’s descendant,” implying a familial connection to the deity.
  • Thorkell – Signifies “Thor’s cauldron,” possibly implying strength or protection by Thor.
  • Torbjorn – Translates to “Thor’s bear,” symbolizing a bear-like strength or fierceness.
  • Thorfinn – Means “Thor’s Finn” or “Finn of Thor,” with “Finn” possibly referring to someone from Finland or a wanderer.
  • Tryggvi – A name meaning “trustworthy” or “faithful,” alluding to reliability and honor.
  • Tove – A feminine name that could be derived from “Thor” and signify “beautiful.”
  • Torhild – Signifies “Thor’s battle,” suggesting a warrior protected by Thor.
  • Thorir – Means “Thor’s warrior,” indicating a fighter under Thor’s patronage.
  • Torstein – Translates to “Thor’s stone,” possibly denoting solidity and strength.
  • Thorbjorg – A feminine name meaning “Thor’s protection,” similar to Thormund.
  • Thordis – Signifies “Thor’s goddess” or “Thor’s sister,” a powerful feminine connection to the god.
  • Torgils – A name meaning “Thor’s hostage” or “pledge,” potentially indicating a person dedicated to Thor.
  • Thorarin – Means “Thor’s army” or “warrior of Thor,” suggesting a martial aspect.
  • Thorgils – Similar to Torgils, meaning “Thor’s hostage” or “pledge.”
  • Torunn – A feminine name meaning “Thor’s love” or “secret of Thor.”
  • Torgerd – Signifies “Thor’s enclosure,” which could imply protection or sanctuary.
  • Tordis – Similar to Thordis, meaning “Thor’s goddess” or “Thor’s sister.”
  • Thorketil – A name that could mean “Thor’s cauldron” or “Thor’s helmet,” indicating protection.
  • Thorleik – Translates to “Thor’s play” or “Thor’s game,” which might refer to battle or competition.
  • Torgeir – Means “Thor’s spear,” symbolizing a warrior or a weapon associated with Thor.
  • Thorgrim – Signifies “Thor’s mask” or “fierce,” referring to a fearsome aspect.
  • Thorgunn – A feminine name meaning “Thor’s battle” or “warrior,” similar to Torhild.
  • Torkel – A variation of Thorkell, meaning “Thor’s cauldron.”
  • Thorfast – Means “Thor’s stronghold,” suggesting steadfastness or reliability.
  • Thorhalla – A feminine name that could mean “Thor’s rock” or “hall,” suggesting strength or a place of gathering.
  • Thorgnyr – Translates to “Thor’s noise” or “clamor,” possibly referring to the sound of battle.
  • Torbrand – A name meaning “Thor’s sword,” denoting a weapon or a warrior.
  • Thorr – Another form of “Thor,” the Norse god of thunder and strength.
  • Thorgeir – Similar to Torgeir, meaning “Thor’s spear.”
  • Tormod – Means “Thor’s courage,” suggesting bravery and valor.
  • Thorwald – Signifies “Thor’s ruler” or “power,” similar to Thorvald.
  • Toralf – A name that means “Thor’s elf,” combining Norse mythology with mythical creatures.
  • Thord – A shorter form of names like Thormund or Thordis, related to Thor.
  • Thorgny – Similar to Thorgnyr, meaning “Thor’s noise” or “clamor.”
  • Torvid – Signifies “Thor’s tree” or “wide,” potentially referring to strength or growth.
  • Thorgeist – A name that could mean “Thor’s spirit” or “ghost,” suggesting a spiritual connection.
  • Torbjorg – Similar to Thorbjorg, meaning “Thor’s protection.”
  • Thorsten – Another variation of Torstein, meaning “Thor’s stone.”
  • Thorkil – A variation of Thorkell, signifying “Thor’s cauldron.”
  • Torquil – A name meaning “Thor’s cauldron” or “kettle,” similar to Thorkell and Torkel.
  • Thorolf – Translates to “Thor’s wolf,” symbolizing a fierce and loyal warrior.
  • Tormar – A name that could mean “Thor’s fame” or “renowned by Thor.”
  • Thorgaut – Signifies “Thor’s Goth,” which could refer to a Gothic individual associated with Thor.
  • Torrad – A name that might mean “Thor’s advice” or “counsel,” suggesting wisdom.
  • Thorvid – Means “Thor’s tree” or “wide,” similar to Torvid.
  • Torkjell – Another form of Thorkell, meaning “Thor’s cauldron.”

U

viking names Jtart with U

  • Ulf – Derived from Old Norse, meaning “wolf.”
  • Ulrik – A Scandinavian variant of the Germanic name Ulrich, meaning “prosperity and power.”
  • Ulfar – An Old Norse name that can be interpreted as “wolf army.”
  • Ulfred – A name combining “wolf” with “peace,” suggesting a peaceful warrior.
  • Ulfgar – A name meaning “wolf spear,” indicating a fierce warrior.
  • Ulfric – Means “wolf power,” denoting strength and leadership.
  • Ulmar – A rare name possibly meaning “fame of the wolf.”
  • Ulric – Another form of Ulrich, meaning “rich heritage” or “noble ruler.”
  • Ulvar – A variation of Ulfar, with a similar meaning related to a “wolf army.”
  • Unnar – An Old Norse name meaning “the one who loves battle.”
  • Ulfbert – A name that could mean “bright wolf” or “famous wolf.”
  • Ulrikke – A feminine form of Ulrik, meaning “prosperous ruler.”
  • Ulfhild – A name that combines “wolf” with “battle,” suggesting a warrior.
  • Ulrika – The Swedish and German feminine version of Ulrik.
  • Urd – In Norse mythology, Urd is one of the Norns, beings who shape destiny.
  • Ulfrik – A variant of Ulfric, meaning “powerful as a wolf.”
  • Ulv – A shorter form of Ulf, directly translating to “wolf.”
  • Uffe – A diminutive of Ulf, still retaining the meaning of “wolf.”
  • Ulfarinn – A name that could mean “the traveling wolf” or “warrior wolf.”
  • Ull – In Norse mythology, Ull is a god associated with archery and skiing.
  • Ulfke – A diminutive or variant of Ulf, meaning “little wolf.”
  • Ulferd – A variant of Ulfred, meaning “peaceful wolf.”
  • Ullr – Another spelling of Ull, the Norse god of winter sports.
  • Ulfwin – A name that might mean “friend of the wolf.”
  • Ulfbjorn – This name combines “wolf” with “bear,” indicating a powerful individual.
  • Ulfrun – A name meaning “secret of the wolf.”
  • Ulfhedin – A compound of “wolf” and “heathen,” possibly referring to a warrior’s attire.
  • Ulle – A pet form of names beginning with “Ulf.”
  • Ulrikka – A variant of Ulrikke, meaning “prosperous ruler.”
  • Ulvarinn – A name that could be interpreted as “the warrior wolf.”
  • Ulfreda – A feminine form of Ulfred, meaning “peaceful wolf.”
  • Ulfra – Possibly a short form or variant of Ulfreda.
  • Ulfhedinna – A feminine form of Ulfhedin, referring to a wolf-warrior’s attire.
  • Ulricke – A feminine variant of Ulric, meaning “noble ruler.”
  • Ulfkeinn – A name that might mean “keen wolf” or “sharp-minded wolf.”
  • Ulfhildr – A Norse name meaning “battle wolf.”
  • Ulfsdottir – A patronymic surname meaning “daughter of Ulf.”
  • Ulfthor – A name that combines “wolf” with the name of the god Thor.
  • Ulfvaldr – A name meaning “wolf ruler” or “powerful wolf.”
  • Ulfwyn – A variant of Ulfwin, meaning “friend of the wolf.”
  • Ulfsun – Likely a misspelling or variant of Ulfsun, which would mean “son of the wolf.”
  • Ulfske – Possibly a diminutive or variant of Ulf, again meaning “little wolf.”
  • Ulfson – A patronymic surname meaning “son of Ulf.”
  • Ulfsdatter – A patronymic surname meaning “daughter of Ulf.”
  • Ulfrikson – A patronymic surname meaning “son of Ulfrik.”
  • Ulftred – Likely a variant of Ulfred, meaning “peaceful wolf.”
  • Ulfwynn – A variant of Ulfwyn, with a similar meaning.
  • Ulfarr – A name that could mean “army wolf” or “warrior wolf.”
  • Ulfdan – A name that might mean “Danish wolf” or “wolf from Denmark.”
  • Ulfkell – A name that combines “wolf” with “kettle” or “helmet,” possibly denoting protection or battle.

V

viking names Jtart with V

  • Vagn – This name means “wagon” or “cart” in Old Norse, possibly denoting someone who owned or made wagons.
  • Valbrand – A combination of Old Norse elements meaning “ruler” and “sword,” suggesting a warrior or a leader.
  • Valdarr – Derived from Old Norse elements meaning “the dead” and “warrior,” it may refer to a revered warrior.
  • Valdemar – A Scandinavian name composed of elements meaning “rule” and “famous,” often used by royalty.
  • Valgard – This name combines “ruler” or “mighty” with “enclosure” or “protection,” possibly indicating a strong protector.
  • Valgeir – Composed of the Old Norse elements for “ruler” or “mighty” and “spear,” suggesting a warrior’s name.
  • Valki – A diminutive form of names beginning with “Val,” which means “ruler” or “mighty.”
  • Valthjof – A combination of “ruler” or “mighty” and “thief,” which could imply a cunning or resourceful person.
  • Vandil – This name may derive from elements meaning “wand” or “staff,” suggesting a person of authority or wisdom.
  • Vandræd – An Old Norse name meaning “trouble” or “difficulty,” possibly referring to a troublesome individual.
  • Vanlandi – From Old Norse elements meaning “field” or “land” and possibly a person’s name, indicating someone connected to a particular territory.
  • Varg – This name means “wolf” in Old Norse, often associated with warriors or outlaws in Norse culture.
  • Varin – Possibly derived from a word meaning “defender,” suggesting someone who is protective.
  • Vatnar – Likely related to “water,” this could refer to someone who lives near water or works with it.
  • Vebjorn – A combination of “holy” and “bear,” possibly signifying a person with strength or religious significance.
  • Vedmund – This name combines elements meaning “wood” and “protection,” hinting at someone who is a guardian or connected to the forest.
  • Vegard – Derived from “way” or “journey” and “enclosure” or “protection,” suggesting a guardian of paths or a traveler.
  • Veiðiligr – An Old Norse name meaning “hunting,” likely referring to a skilled hunter.
  • Veit – A name that could be derived from “wise” or “knowing,” indicating a person of knowledge.
  • Vemund – A combination of “man” or “warrior” and “protection,” suggesting a protective warrior.
  • Veraldur – From elements meaning “world” and “sword,” this name might signify a warrior with a broad reach or fame.
  • Vermund – Similar to Vemund, with a meaning of “man” or “warrior” and “protection.”
  • Vernharðr – A name combining “protection” and “hard,” possibly denoting a very strong defender.
  • Vestar – Meaning “west,” this name could refer to someone from the west or associated with the direction.
  • Vestgeir – Combining “west” and “spear,” this could be the name of a warrior from the western lands.
  • Vetrliði – A name meaning “winter traveler,” which could refer to someone born in or associated with winter.
  • Vébjörn – A variant of Vebjorn, meaning “holy bear” and signifying strength or religious importance.
  • Végeirr – An Old Norse name meaning “spear of strength,” indicating a powerful warrior.
  • Véhall – From elements meaning “holy” and “rock” or “stone,” suggesting someone who is steadfast or sacred.
  • Vékleif – A combination of “holy” and “cliff” or “rock,” possibly denoting someone who is unyielding or revered.
  • Vémundr – Another variant of Vemund, with the meaning “man” or “warrior” and “protection.”
  • Vésteinn – This name means “holy stone,” which could signify a person of great significance or resilience.
  • Véþormr – Composed of “holy” and “Thor’s protection,” referring to someone under the protection of the god Thor.
  • Vidar – A name from Norse mythology, representing a god associated with vengeance and silence.
  • Vidkunn – Meaning “widely known,” this name suggests someone with fame or renown.
  • Vigfus – Combining “battle” and “vigorous” or “ready,” hinting at a warrior ever prepared for conflict.
  • Vigi – A short form of names containing “vig,” which means “battle,” often used for warriors.
  • Viglund – A name meaning “battle grove,” which could refer to a place or a person associated with battles.
  • Vigmund – From “battle” and “protection,” indicating a warrior who is also a protector.
  • Vignir – A combination of “battle” and “warrior,” suggesting a formidable fighter.
  • Vigo – A variant of Vigi, which is a name associated with battle and warriors.
  • Vikar – This name might mean “victor” or “conqueror,” indicating a successful warrior or leader.
  • Vili – In Norse mythology, Vili is one of the brothers of Odin, and the name means “will” or “desire.”
  • Villi – A variant of Vili, with the same meaning and mythological association.
  • Vindr – Meaning “wind,” this name could refer to someone swift or changeable.
  • Vingi – Possibly related to “wing” or “friend,” suggesting a swift or amiable person.
  • Vingthor – A name combining “wing” or “friend” with the name of the god Thor, possibly denoting a warrior or a follower of Thor.
  • Vinland – Referring to the name given by Norse explorers to parts of North America, meaning “wine land” or “meadow land.”
  • Virek – This name’s meaning is unclear, but it could be related to “man” or “hero.”
  • Visteinn – A combination of “holy” and “stone,” similar to Vésteinn, indicating strength or sacredness.

W

viking names Jtart with W

  • Waltheof – A name of Old English origin, likely meaning “foreign thief.”
  • Wandal – A name possibly derived from the Germanic tribe known as the Vandals.
  • Warin – A name of Germanic origin, meaning “guard” or “protect.”
  • Warmond – A name with Germanic roots, which may mean “protector” or “guardian.”
  • Wartooth – A descriptive name possibly denoting a fierce or formidable warrior.
  • Wastulf – A Germanic name that could mean “wolf of the wasteland.”
  • Wealdmaer – An Old English name meaning “famous power.”
  • Wecta – A name with uncertain meaning, possibly linked to a legendary ancestor of the Jutes.
  • Weder – Likely a variant of the name “Weather” or “Weder,” possibly denoting someone who faces storms.
  • Wehha – A name of uncertain origin, possibly an early Anglo-Saxon or pre-Saxon name.
  • Weland – The English form of the legendary smith Wayland, known from Norse mythology.
  • Welf – A Germanic name meaning “puppy” or “whelp,” also associated with a noble dynasty.
  • Wenda – Possibly a feminine name or a variant of “Wendel,” meaning “a wanderer.”
  • Wendel – A name meaning “a wanderer,” possibly referring to the Wends, a Slavic people.
  • Wends – Refers to a Slavic tribe, but as a name, it could denote someone of that origin.
  • Werburgh – An Anglo-Saxon name meaning “fortress.”
  • Werferth – An Old English name meaning “worthy of the army.”
  • Wermund – A name of Germanic origin, meaning “protection” or “guardian.”
  • Weyland – Another form of Weland, referring to the legendary smith.
  • Whitemane – A descriptive name likely referring to someone with white or light-colored hair.
  • Widukind – A Saxon leader’s name, meaning “child of the wood.”
  • Wig – A short form of various Old English names beginning with “Wig,” meaning “war.”
  • Wiglaf – An Old English name meaning “war remainder” or perhaps “war survivor.”
  • Wigmund – A Germanic name meaning “war protection.”
  • Wilf – A diminutive form of names beginning with “Wil,” possibly meaning “will” or “desire.”
  • Wilfred – A name meaning “desiring peace.”
  • Willa – The feminine form of “Will,” meaning “will” or “desire.”
  • Willem – A variant of “William,” meaning “resolute protector.”
  • Wilmot – A diminutive of “William,” meaning “little resolute one.”
  • Winfrith – An Old English name meaning “friend of peace.”
  • Winga – A name of uncertain meaning, possibly related to “Wing,” a settlement or “battle.”
  • Wini – Possibly a diminutive or pet form of names beginning with “Win.”
  • Winna – Likely a variant of “Wini,” a diminutive form of names beginning with “Win.”
  • Winnoc – A name of uncertain origin, possibly related to “win” and “conquer.”
  • Winric – An Old English name meaning “friend of victory.”
  • Winsige – A name meaning “victory” and “victory-day.”
  • Winta – A name possibly related to “winter” or a personal name meaning “winner.”
  • Winters – Likely a descriptive name for someone born or associated with winter.
  • Wiprecht – A Germanic name meaning “who fights.”
  • Wisgard – A name of uncertain origin, possibly “wise enclosure” or “wise protection.”
  • Withgar – An Old English name meaning “spear of battle.”
  • Withold – A Germanic name meaning “ruler of the forest.”
  • Witta – A short form of names beginning with “Wit,” meaning “wide” or “wise.”
  • Wittan – A name meaning “wise one,” or related to the “Witan,” the council of elders.
  • Witter – Possibly a variant of “Wittan,” meaning “wise one.”
  • Wodan – The Old High German form of “Odin,” the chief god in Norse mythology.
  • Wolf – A name that directly translates to the animal “wolf,” symbolizing a strong warrior or leader.
  • Wolfram – A Germanic name meaning “wolf raven.”
  • Wulf – A variant of “Wolf,” common in Old English and Germanic names.
  • Wulfgar – An Old English name meaning “wolf spear,” indicating a warrior.

X

24viking names Jtart with X

  • Xarald – A Norse name possibly meaning “ruler of the army.”
  • Xarik – Likely a variation of a Norse name, hinting at a warrior or ruler.
  • Xarulf – A name with elements suggesting association with wolves, a common theme in Viking culture.
  • Xastein – This name could mean “stone,” often used in Norse names to symbolize strength.
  • Xasvald – Likely a derivative of Old Norse names with “valdr,” meaning ruler or power.
  • Xandar – Possibly a form of “Alexander” or a derivative of a Norse name meaning warrior.
  • Xanrik – A name that may suggest a powerful and mighty ruler, with “rik” implying a kingdom or realm.
  • Xarikson – A patronymic indicating “son of Xarik,” a common naming convention in Viking culture.
  • Xarn – Short and strong, possibly related to a term for “iron” or “warrior.”
  • Xarthor – A name that evokes the god Thor, with a martial connotation.
  • Xarulfson – Another patronymic name meaning “son of Xarulf.”
  • Xavaldir – Suggestive of a leader or someone in command, with “vald” implying power.
  • Xaviar – Resembling “Xavier,” it could imply brightness or a new house.
  • Xebjorn – Likely a variation of “Bjorn,” meaning bear, a symbol of strength in Norse culture.
  • Xedric – A variant of “Cedric,” with Old English roots, possibly meaning “bounty” or “chivalry.”
  • Xefar – A unique name that might be derived from Norse terms for warrior or journey.
  • Xegar – This name could be related to Old Norse words for spear or combat.
  • Xelmar – Possibly a Norse form, with elements meaning helmet or protection.
  • Xelsig – A name that could signify victory or a victorious person.
  • Xemund – A Norse name element “mund” often means protection.
  • Xenar – This name might be a variant of a Norse name with roots in honor or bravery.
  • Xenulf – A name combining the wolf element with a possible meaning of noble or fierce.
  • Xeoric – Likely a variant of a Norse name, with “ric” suggesting a rich or powerful ruler.
  • Xerak – A name that could be derived from words for ruler or mighty in Old Norse.
  • Xericsson – Indicating “son of Xeric,” following Norse naming traditions.
  • Xermund – A Norse name element “mund” typically signifies protection.
  • Xernar – This name might derive from Norse elements meaning warrior or strong.
  • Xestor – A name that could be a Norse variant, possibly related to the Old Norse word for horse.
  • Xetor – Likely a variant of a Norse name with connotations of thunder or a god.
  • Xevar – A name that might be related to Norse words for guardian or defender.
  • Xidar – Possibly a Norse name with roots in battle or warrior.
  • Xidric – A variant of a Norse name, with “ric” suggesting a rich or powerful ruler.
  • Xigurd – A Norse name meaning guardian or hero, often associated with the legendary Sigurd.
  • Xihar – This could be a variant of a Norse name with martial connotations.
  • Xikar – A strong name that might be associated with Norse words for warrior.
  • Xilmar – A Norse name element “helm” means helmet or protection.
  • Ximund – A name that might combine Norse elements for home or protection.
  • Xinar – Possibly a derivative of a Norse name with a meaning related to honor or warrior.
  • Xinric – A name that might mean a powerful and wealthy ruler in Old Norse.
  • Xior – A Norse name that could be a variant of “Ivar,” meaning archer or bow warrior.
  • Xirik – A name that might be associated with Norse words for ruler or powerful.
  • Xiroc – Likely a variation of a Norse name, with connotations of a ruler or warrior.
  • Xitar – A name that could be related to Norse words for warrior or hero.
  • Xivar – Possibly a variant of “Ivar,” a Norse name meaning bow warrior or archer.
  • Xjorn – A name that might derive from the Norse element for bear, “bjorn.”
  • Xjorund – Likely a Norse name with elements meaning “chief” or “horse.”
  • Xolaf – A variant of “Olaf,” a Norse name meaning ancestor’s relic.
  • Xonar – Possibly a Norse name with a meaning related to honor or warrior.
  • Xorik – A name that could mean a powerful and wealthy ruler in Old Norse.
  • Xostein – A Norse name element “stein” means stone, symbolizing strength and stability.

Y

2524viking names Jtart with Y

  • Yalmar – Likely a variation of the name Hjalmar, meaning “helmeted warrior” in Old Norse.
  • Yarle – Possibly derived from Jarl, which means “nobleman” or “chieftain.”
  • Yarn – This name might be derived from Jǫrmunr, another name for Odin, or it could be a misspelling or variation.
  • Yarulf – A name that could mean “wolf” after the Old Norse element “ulfr.”
  • Ybbi – Likely a diminutive or variation of a Norse name, possibly related to “Ibb,” which is a diminutive of the name Ívarr.
  • Ydun – A variation of the name Idunn, a goddess in Norse mythology associated with youth and rejuvenation.
  • Yerik – Likely a Norse variant of Erik, meaning “eternal ruler.”
  • Yggr – An Old Norse name, one of the many epithets for the god Odin, meaning “terrible one.”
  • Ylfa – A feminine name possibly related to the Old Norse word for “she-wolf.”
  • Ylvar – May be a variant of the name Alvar, meaning “elf warrior.”
  • Ymir – In Norse mythology, Ymir is the primordial giant and the progenitor of all jötnar (giants).
  • Yngvar – A name combining “Yngvi,” an alternate name for the god Freyr, and “arr,” meaning warrior.
  • Yngvi – Another name for the Norse god Freyr, representing fertility and prosperity.
  • Ynjarr – A rare Norse name that might be related to “Yngvi” and “arr,” suggesting a warrior aspect.
  • Ynolf – Likely a variation of the name Anulfr, which means “ancestral wolf.”
  • Yorick – A Scandinavian name possibly derived from “Jørg,” meaning “earth-worker” or “farmer.”
  • Yorun – Possibly a variant of Jǫrunn, a name derived from the Old Norse elements meaning “love” and “secret.”
  • Yost – Could be a short form of Jostein, meaning “horse” and “stone.”
  • Yotar – This name is less common and its meaning isn’t clear, but it might be related to “Jotun,” the giants in Norse mythology.
  • Yoti – Likely a diminutive or variation of a Norse name, but the exact origin is unclear.
  • Yrling – May derive from “jarling,” which is a diminutive of “jarl,” meaning “young chieftain.”
  • Yrsa – A female name that may mean “she-bear,” with connections to Norse legends.
  • Ysulf – A name that could combine “ís” meaning “ice” and “ulfr” meaning “wolf.”
  • Yuli – Potentially a Norse diminutive or variant of a name like Julius, though not traditionally Norse.
  • Yulvar – Similar to Ylvar, possibly meaning “elf warrior.”
  • Yurik – A variant of Yerik, which is likely a Norse form of Erik.
  • Yvar – A Norse name that could be derived from “ivar,” meaning “yew” and “warrior.”
  • Yve – Might be a variant of the female name Eva or a short form of Yvette in a Norse context.
  • Yvindr – A Norse name possibly meaning “wind warrior” or “winner.”
  • Yvor – Could be a Norse variant of Ivor, meaning “yew bow warrior.”
  • Yvorn – Similar to Yvor, this name may also mean “yew bow warrior.”
  • Yngar – A variation of Yngvar, emphasizing the association with the god Freyr and “warrior.”
  • Yngarik – Combines “Yngvi” with “rik,” suggesting “ruler” or “mighty.”
  • Yngarth – A name that could mean “Yngvi’s enclosure” or “stronghold.”
  • Yngir – Possibly a diminutive of names starting with “Yng,” related to the god Freyr.
  • Yngjald – A name that might combine “Yngvi” with “valdr,” meaning “ruler” or “powerful one.”
  • Yngvi-Frey – A compound name that directly references the god Freyr, combining his alternate name Yngvi with his title.
  • Yngvild – A female name that might mean “battle” or “fighter” associated with the name Yngvi.
  • Yngwar – Another variant of Yngvar, with the “warrior” element present.
  • Ynjolf – A name that might combine “Yngvi” with “ulf,” meaning “wolf.”
  • Ynvar – Similar to Yngvar, with a variation in spelling but likely the same meaning.
  • Ynvid – This name’s meaning is not clear, but it could be related to “Yngvi” and “vid,” which means “forest.”
  • Yoldi – A rare name, possibly a variant of a Norse name, but its meaning is uncertain.
  • Yorgrim – May mean “fierce” or “grim” as a warrior, possibly related to the word “grim.”
  • Yorulf – Combines “yor” with “ulfr,” possibly meaning “wolf.”
  • Yotnar – Likely a reference to the Jötnar, the giants of Norse mythology.
  • Ysbrand – Could mean “ice sword,” from “ís” (ice) and “brandr” (sword).
  • Ysmir – A name that might be associated with “Ís” meaning “ice” and “mǣrr” meaning “famous.”
  • Yspak – An unusual name, possibly a variant of a Norse name, but its meaning is uncertain.
  • Yvorin – Likely a variant of Yvor, meaning “yew bow warrior.”

Z

2524viking names Jtart with Z

  • Zagnar – Likely a variation of “Ragnar,” a popular Scandinavian name meaning “warrior” or “judgment.”
  • Zaldor – A name that may be derived from Old Norse elements, possibly meaning “strong.”
  • Zanar – A name with no clear origin, but it sounds similar to “Sven,” which means “young man” or “young warrior.”
  • Zandar – Possibly a variation of “Alexander,” which means “defender of men” in Greek.
  • Zane – A name of Hebrew origin meaning “gift from God,” though in a Viking context, it could be a variation of a Norse name.
  • Zanrik – A unique name that doesn’t have a clear meaning but could be a combination of Norse elements.
  • Zarik – A name that might be derived from “Erik,” which means “eternal ruler.”
  • Zarkon – A name that sounds powerful and could be a composite of Norse elements, implying strength or rule.
  • Zarn – This name could be a shortened form of a longer Norse name, possibly related to iron or metal.
  • Zaron – Possibly a variation of “Jaron,” meaning “to cry out” or “sing” in Hebrew, but in a Viking context, it’s likely a different name.
  • Zarthor – A name that seems to be a blend of fantasy and Norse elements, suggesting a strong character.
  • Zaskar – A name that may be a variation of “Asgeir,” a Norse name meaning “god’s spear.”
  • Zavik – A name with no clear origin but could be a Norse-inspired creation, sounding like a strong leader.
  • Zavor – This name does not have a known meaning but has a Norse-like sound to it, perhaps signifying a person of importance.
  • Zboran – A name that sounds Slavic in origin and does not relate directly to Viking names.
  • Zdar – Could be a short form or variation of a Norse name, possibly related to the word “star.”
  • Zedrik – A name that might be a variation of “Cedric,” which has Celtic origins meaning “bounty” or “chivalry.”
  • Zefar – A unique name that doesn’t have a clear meaning but could be inspired by Norse phonetics.
  • Zegar – A name that sounds like a Norse warrior’s name, possibly meaning “victory” or “spear.”
  • Zelmar – Could be a variation of “Selmar,” which means “famous at sea” in Old Norse.
  • Zenar – A name that seems to be a modern invention with a Norse-sounding twist.
  • Zenon – A Greek name meaning “gift of Zeus,” but in a Viking context, it might represent a different origin.
  • Zentar – A name that sounds mythical and could be a blend of Norse and fantasy elements.
  • Zerk – A name that might be a Norse-inspired creation, implying a strong, warrior-like character.
  • Zermar – This name does not have a known meaning but could be a Norse invention, possibly related to the sea.
  • Zeron – A name that could be a variation of “Soren,” which means “stern” in Danish.
  • Zervik – A name that seems to be a modern invention with a Norse-like sound to it.
  • Zeskar – A name that might be a variation of “Oscar,” derived from Old Norse elements meaning “god spear.”
  • Zetar – A name that sounds like it could be a Norse warrior’s name, possibly meaning “ruler.”
  • Zevar – A name that does not have a clear meaning but has a Norse-sounding resonance.
  • Zidar – A name that could be a variation of “Ivar,” which means “bow warrior” or “yew warrior.”
  • Zikar – A name that might be a Norse-inspired creation, suggesting a strong character.
  • Zilmar – A name that could be a modern invention with a Norse-sounding element, possibly related to “Selmar.”
  • Zimar – A name with no clear meaning but could be a modern take on Norse names, suggesting a strong character.
  • Zindar – A name that could be a variation of “Sindri,” a dwarf in Norse mythology known for his craftsmanship.
  • Zingar – A name that might be a Norse-inspired creation, suggesting a wanderer or adventurer.
  • Zinon – A name that could be a modern invention with a Norse-sounding twist, similar to “Zenon.”
  • Zintar – A unique name that doesn’t have a clear meaning but could be inspired by Norse elements.
  • Zirk – A name that might be a Norse-inspired creation, implying a strong, warrior-like character.
  • Ziron – A name that could be a variation of “Soren,” which means “stern” in Danish, or a modern invention.
  • Ziskar – A name that might be a variation of “Oscar,” derived from Old Norse elements meaning “god spear.”
  • Zitar – A name that sounds like it could be a Norse warrior’s name, possibly meaning “ruler.”
  • Zivar – A name that does not have a clear meaning but has a Norse-sounding resonance.
  • Zivor – A name that could be a modern invention with a Norse-like sound to it.
  • Zlar – A name with no clear meaning but could be a modern take on Norse names, suggesting a strong character.
  • Zolar – A name that could be a modern invention with a Norse-sounding element, possibly related to “solar.”
  • Zorar – A name that might be a Norse-inspired creation, suggesting a strong character.
  • Zorik – A name that could be a variation of “Erik,” which means “eternal ruler.”
  • Zorn – A German word meaning “anger,” but as a Viking name, it could imply a fierce warrior.
  • Zulmar – A name that could be a modern invention with a Norse-sounding element, possibly related to “Selmar.”

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