Australian Slang For Dinner (6 Examples)

Written by Gabriel Cruz - Foodie, Animal Lover, Slang & Language Enthusiast

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Dinner is an important meal, and sometimes the only one where the entire family can get together and share food. Different countries can have various ways they refer to that meal. Australians tend to have unique slang words for everything, and dinner is no different. In this article, let’s take a look at the different Australian slang words for dinner.

Blowout

Meaning:

  • (Noun) There are several meanings to the term ‘blowout’ when it comes to food. In this context, its usage is to describe a large social meal usually held in the evening.

Example:

  • Our barbecue blowout that we organize at the end of each month is always so much fun! 

Chow

Meaning:

  • (Noun) Chow is an informal term for a meal used in certain English-speaking countries. It is often used in Australia as slang for dinner.

Example:

  • Come on everyone, it’s time for chow!

Hakari

Meaning:

  • (Noun) Hakari is a type of feast that is held in New Zealand as a part of special occasions. Held in the evening so the word can be also used as slang for dinner.

Example:

  • Expecting to eat some nice food for hakari tonight.

Nosh-up

Meaning:

  • (Noun) In general, a nosh-up is an occasion in which people eat a huge amount of food. It is also quite common to use it as slang for dinner, especially in Australia.

Example:

  • For nosh-up this evening, mom is making pancakes, I can’t wait!

Repast

Meaning:

  • (Noun) This word is a synonym for a meal, generally, but can also be a slang word for dinner.

Example:

  • I enjoyed the sandwiches, the cake, and the coffee, what an amazing repast that was!

Tea

Meaning:

  • (Noun) In Australia, tea is the expression people use for an evening meal, but also for a simple cup of tea. It can get confusing, especially with the modern usage of the word for gossip, but in time, you can easily tell the difference.

Example:

  • Looking forward to tea this evening, we’re having pizza!

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