Top 1200 Greek Names From A-Z (2024)

Written by Gabriel Cruz - Foodie, Animal Lover, Slang & Language Enthusiast

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Welcome to our comprehensive guide on the “Top 1200 Greek Names”! This blog post is a deep dive into the rich and varied tapestry of Greek names, each carrying its own unique history, meaning, and cultural significance. From the timeless classics that echo the tales of ancient gods and heroes, to modern variations that continue to resonate in contemporary Greek society, we’ll explore the fascinating world of Greek nomenclature. Whether you’re seeking inspiration for naming your child, interested in the roots of your own name, or simply curious about Greek culture, this list offers a thorough exploration into one of the most linguistically rich and historically profound naming traditions in the world. Join us on this journey through the beauty and diversity of Greek names!

A

greek names starting with letter A

 

  • Alexandros: A classic Greek name meaning “defender of men,” famously borne by Alexander the Great.
  • Anastasios: Meaning “resurrection,” it’s a traditional name often associated with the Easter period.
  • Andreas: The Greek form of Andrew, meaning “manly” or “brave.”
  • Angelos: Translates to “angel” or “messenger,” symbolizing a divine messenger.
  • Ariadne: In Greek mythology, she was the daughter of Minos who helped Theseus escape the Labyrinth.
  • Athanasios: Means “immortal,” reflecting a desire for longevity or a spiritual connection.
  • Agatha: Derived from the Greek word for “good” or “honorable.”
  • Agnes: Means “pure” or “holy,” and is a name of early Christian origins.
  • Alkaios: An ancient name meaning “strong,” known from Greek poetry and mythology.
  • Althea: Meaning “healer,” it’s a name rooted in Greek mythology.
  • Amara: Signifies “eternal” or “unfading,” often associated with lasting beauty or strength.
  • Anastasia: Widely popular, it means “resurrection,” symbolizing rebirth or new beginnings.
  • Andromeda: From mythology, she was a princess rescued by Perseus, and the name means “advising like a man.”
  • Antigone: A tragic figure in Greek mythology, her name means “against birth” or “in place of a mother.”
  • Antonis: The Greek version of Anthony, meaning “priceless” or “of inestimable worth.”
  • Aphrodite: The name of the Greek goddess of love and beauty.
  • Apollonia: Feminine form of Apollo, referencing the sun god and symbolizing light or creativity.
  • Arachne: A name from Greek mythology, meaning “spider,” known from the tale of a woman transformed into a spider.
  • Ares: The Greek god of war, representing strength and courage.
  • Argus: Meaning “shining” or “bright,” known from the myth of Argus Panoptes, the many-eyed giant.
  • Ariana: Deriving from the Greek for “most holy,” it’s a name with regal and sacred connotations.
  • Aristides: Meaning “the best kind,” historically associated with a famous Athenian statesman.
  • Artemis: The goddess of the hunt, wilderness, and childbirth in Greek mythology.
  • Aspasia: A name associated with wisdom and learning, famously borne by the lover of Pericles.
  • Athena: The Greek goddess of wisdom, courage, and warfare, a central figure in Greek mythology.
  • Athina: A modern variant of Athena, maintaining the connection to wisdom and strength.
  • Atlas: In Greek mythology, the Titan who held up the sky, symbolizing endurance and strength.
  • Atalanta: A famed huntress and runner in Greek mythology, representing speed and independence.
  • Achilleas: The Greek form of Achilles, known for the legendary hero of the Trojan War.
  • Adonis: In mythology, a symbol of beauty and desire, loved by both Aphrodite and Persephone.
  • Aeneas: A Trojan hero in Greek and Roman mythology, known from Virgil’s epic “Aeneid.”
  • Aeson: Father of the hero Jason, the name suggests healing and rejuvenation.
  • Agamemnon: A king and key figure in the Trojan War, his name signifies “very steadfast.”
  • Aias: Known as Ajax in English, a hero in Greek mythology noted for his strength and courage.
  • Aikaterini: The Greek form of Catherine, meaning “pure.”
  • Aiolos: Keeper of the winds in Greek mythology, representing control and power over nature.
  • Akrivi: Meaning “precision” or “accuracy,” reflecting a desire for clarity and truth.
  • Alekos: A diminutive of Alexandros, retaining the meaning of “defender of men.”
  • Alethea: Symbolizes “truth,” a virtue highly regarded in classical Greek culture.
  • Alkibiades: A prominent Athenian statesman and general, the name signifies strength and resolve.
  • Alkinoos: A mythological king, known for his role in the Odyssey, representing hospitality and leadership.
  • Alkippe: In mythology, the name means “strong horse,” symbolizing strength and nobility.
  • Alkmene: Mother of Heracles in Greek mythology, embodying strength and motherhood.
  • Amalthea: In mythology, the goat who nursed Zeus, symbolizing nourishment and protection.
  • Anargyros: Meaning “not silver,” often associated with selflessness and disdain for material wealth.
  • Anastas: A variant of Anastasios, also meaning “resurrection” or “rebirth.”
  • Androniki: Meaning “victory of a man,” symbolizing triumph and strength.
  • Anthea: Translates to “flower” or “blossom,” representing beauty and nature.
  • Antiope: A warrior queen in Greek mythology, representing strength and independence.
  • Antonia: Feminine form of Antonis, meaning “priceless” or “of inestimable value.”

B

greek names starting with letter B

  • Basil: A name derived from the Greek “basileus,” meaning “king,” often associated with St. Basil, a prominent 4th-century Greek bishop.
  • Babis: A popular Greek diminutive of Charalambos, meaning “shining with joy.”
  • Balios: In Greek mythology, Balios was one of the immortal horses gifted to Achilles.
  • Barbara: Originating from Greek, meaning “foreign,” traditionally linked to Saint Barbara, an early Christian martyr.
  • Barys: A Greek name meaning “heavy” or “profound.”
  • Basileios: Greek for “royal” or “kingly,” the masculine form of Basil.
  • Basiliki: The feminine version of Basileios, meaning “royal” or “queenly” in Greek.
  • Bastian: A shortened form of Sebastian, with Greek roots meaning “venerable.”
  • Beatrice: Although not originally Greek, it’s used in Greece, meaning “she who brings happiness.”
  • Beatrix: Similar to Beatrice, it means “she who brings happiness” and is found in Greek-speaking areas.
  • Belynda: A contemporary name used in Greek regions, possibly blending Belinda and Linda.
  • Benedita: A Greek variation of Benedicta, which means “blessed.”
  • Benito: A form of Benedict, used in Greek, signifying “blessed.”
  • Berenice: Of Greek origin, meaning “bringing victory,” and a name for several historical figures.
  • Bessie: A diminutive of Elizabeth, which in Greek means “God is my oath.”
  • Bethan: A shortened version of Elizabeth, which in Greek means “God is my oath.”
  • Bianca: An Italian name meaning “white,” also adopted in Greek-speaking areas.
  • Bibiane: A variant of Vivian, meaning “alive,” embraced in Greek culture.
  • Bion: An ancient Greek name meaning “life.”
  • Blanche: Of French origin, meaning “white,” but also used in Greek-speaking areas.
  • Blathnaid: An Irish name meaning “flower,” adopted in Greek-speaking communities.
  • Blythe: An English name meaning “happy,” utilized in Greek-speaking regions.
  • Borias: Possibly derived from Boreas, the Greek god of the North Wind.
  • Boulis: A Greek variation of the name Paul, meaning “small” or “humble.”
  • Briseis: A figure from Greek mythology, known in the Trojan War and associated with Achilles.
  • Britomartis: A goddess in Greek mythology, linked to hunting and nature.
  • Bryaxis: An ancient Greek sculptor, though the precise meaning of the name is unclear.
  • Brygida: A form of Bridget, adopted in Greek culture, meaning “exalted one.”
  • Bryony: Originates from a Greek word for a climbing plant, utilized as a name.
  • Bryseis: A variation of Briseis, a character in Greek mythology.
  • Byblis: In Greek mythology, a nymph known for her tragic love story.
  • Byzantios: Pertaining to Byzantium, an ancient Greek city that became Constantinople.
  • Basilissa: The feminine equivalent of Basil, meaning “queen” in Greek.
  • Bastiaan: A form of Sebastian, signifying “venerable” in Greek.
  • Bionda: A unique name of uncertain origin, used in Greek-speaking regions.
  • Borus: A name possibly linked to Greek mythology.
  • Boulos: The Greek version of Paul, meaning “small” or “humble.”
  • Brizo: An ancient Greek goddess believed to protect sailors.
  • Brygos: A name found in ancient Greek pottery and mythology.
  • Brynn: Originally Welsh, meaning “hill,” but utilized in Greek contexts.
  • Bysso: A Greek name of unknown meaning.
  • Babylas: An early Christian saint martyred in Antioch.
  • Bacchis: Associated with several notable individuals in Greek history.
  • Bacchylides: An ancient Greek lyric poet known for his odes and epinicians.
  • Bakchos: A variation of Bacchus, the Greek god of wine and festivity.
  • Balbina: A name of uncertain origin, possibly used in Greek-speaking areas.
  • Baltazar: A form of Balthazar, one of the Magi in Christian tradition.
  • Balthasar: A variant of Balthazar, linked to one of the Magi in the New Testament.
  • Basilides: An early Christian philosopher and theologian of Greek heritage.

C

greek names starting with letter C

  • Calliope: The muse of epic poetry in Greek mythology.
  • Cleopatra: The famous Egyptian queen known for her beauty and intelligence.
  • Cassandra: A prophetess in Greek mythology who was cursed to never be believed.
  • Constantine: A historically significant name, borne by several Byzantine emperors.
  • Chrysanthi: A feminine name meaning “golden flower.”
  • Charalampos: A Greek name often given to boys, meaning “shining joy.”
  • Callista: A name meaning “most beautiful” in Greek.
  • Cleon: An ancient Greek name, sometimes associated with nobility.
  • Cora: A simple and elegant Greek name.
  • Cyprian: A name with historical and religious significance, associated with Saint Cyprian.
  • Cecilia: While not originally Greek, it’s a popular name with Greek roots, meaning “blind.”
  • Christos: The Greek form of “Christ” and a common name among Greek Orthodox Christians.
  • Calista: A variation of “Callista,” meaning “most beautiful.”
  • Cosmas: A name with religious connotations, meaning “order” or “harmony.”
  • Clio: The muse of history in Greek mythology.
  • Cyril: A name that can have Greek origins, meaning “lordly” or “masterful.”
  • Chloe: A popular and timeless name meaning “blooming” or “young green shoot.”
  • Christabel: A name combining “Christ” with “belle,” meaning “beautiful Christian.”
  • Chrysanthe: A feminine name meaning “golden flower.”
  • Caius: A name with Roman origins but used in Greece, often spelled as “Gaius.”
  • Cyrene: An ancient Greek city and the name of a water nymph in Greek mythology.
  • Cleonidas: A name with Greek warrior connotations.
  • Calixto: A name with Greek and Spanish origins, meaning “most beautiful.”
  • Callias: A name of historical significance in ancient Greece.
  • Cypris: An epithet for the goddess Aphrodite, emphasizing her connection to Cyprus.
  • Cleander: A name meaning “glorious man” or “splendid man.”
  • Cepheus: A constellation in Greek mythology and the name of a king in the story of Andromeda.
  • Callimachus: A name associated with ancient Greek poetry.
  • Chrysaor: In Greek mythology, the son of Medusa and Poseidon, often depicted with a golden sword.
  • Charis: A name meaning “grace” or “kindness” in Greek.
  • Corinna: A feminine name that may mean “maiden” or “maiden of spring.”
  • Clytia: A water nymph in Greek mythology who loved the sun god Apollo.
  • Corinthia: A name associated with the ancient city of Corinth.
  • Clea: A name meaning “fame” or “glory.”
  • Cinyras: A name with mythological significance, associated with the father of Adonis.
  • Corban: A name of possible Greek origin, meaning “offering.”
  • Cyrilla: A feminine name derived from “Cyril,” meaning “lordly” or “masterful.”
  • Chromis: A name with a poetic and artistic feel.
  • Chariton: A name meaning “grace” or “kindness.”
  • Clytemnestra: A famous figure in Greek mythology, wife of Agamemnon.
  • Cyparissus: A name associated with a figure in Greek mythology.
  • Cleodora: A name that may mean “gift of glory.”
  • Charicleia: A name meaning “graceful kindness.”
  • Corax: A name meaning “raven” in Greek.
  • Cytheria: An epithet for the goddess Aphrodite, emphasizing her connection to the island of Cythera.
  • Carpus: A name meaning “fruit” or “produce.”
  • Calydon: An ancient Greek city and the setting for the Calydonian Boar Hunt in mythology.
  • Chryseis: A character in the Iliad, known for her beauty.
  • Castor: One of the Dioscuri twins in Greek mythology, known for his horsemanship.

D

greek names starting with letter D

  • Damianos: Derived from the Greek word “damazo” meaning “to tame,” often associated with the legendary figure of St. Damian.
  • Dimitris: A common Greek name, short for Dimitrios, associated with the goddess Demeter, the deity of agriculture and fertility.
  • Dionysios: Meaning “devotee of Dionysus,” the god of wine and revelry in Greek mythology.
  • Dorothea: Translates to “gift of God” in Greek, echoing the religious sentiment of divine gifting.
  • Despina: Derived from the ancient Greek word for “lady” or “mistress,” often used in reference to a noblewoman.
  • Daphne: Meaning “laurel” in Greek, this name references the mythological nymph who was transformed into a laurel tree.
  • Demetra: A variation of Demeter, the Greek goddess of agriculture and harvest.
  • Demosthenes: An ancient Greek name meaning “strength of the people,” famous for the Athenian orator and statesman.
  • Daria: A name of Persian origins, but popular in Greece, meaning “possessor of goodness.”
  • Diamantis: Translates to “diamond,” symbolizing invincibility and endurance in Greek culture.
  • Danai: Refers to the mythological tribe of Danaans, one of the names used for the Greeks in Homer’s “Iliad.”
  • Dimitra: A derivative of Demetra, representing the goddess of agriculture and fertility in Greek mythology.
  • Diogenes: Means “born of Zeus,” a notable name borne by several ancient Greek philosophers.
  • Dion: A shorter form of Dionysios, referring to a follower of the Greek god Dionysus.
  • Doros: Originating from Dorus, a legendary Greek figure who was the founder of the Dorian tribe.
  • Dinos: Often a diminutive of Konstantinos, but also a standalone name meaning “constant” or “steadfast.”
  • Despo: A variant of Despina, reflecting the noble and authoritative connotations of the name.
  • Damalis: Meaning “calf” or “heifer” in Greek, symbolizing innocence and beauty.
  • Dido: A name of Phoenician origin, famously borne by the queen of Carthage in ancient tales.
  • Dorotea: Similar to Dorothea, this name means “gift of God” in Greek.
  • Dionisia: Feminine form of Dionysios, emphasizing the connection to Dionysus, the Greek god of wine.
  • Diamantina: A feminized version of Diamantis, symbolizing the enduring and precious nature of diamonds.
  • Drakos: Meaning “dragon” in Greek, often symbolizing strength and guardianship.
  • Dafni: A variant of Daphne, referencing the laurel tree and the associated Greek myth.
  • Damaskenos: Relating to Damascus, this name has historical connotations with the ancient city.
  • Dimitrios: The full form of Dimitris, linked to Demeter, the Greek goddess of harvest.
  • Danis: A name that could be a variant of Daniel, meaning “God is my judge,” or a short form of Athanasios.
  • Deka: Meaning “ten” in Greek, often used symbolically or metaphorically.
  • Dimitroula: A diminutive of Dimitra, carrying the same association with the goddess Demeter.
  • Dafnos: Possibly a variant of Daphnis, a pastoral figure in Greek mythology.
  • Doris: Derived from the Dorian tribe, historically known as one of the major tribes of ancient Greeks.
  • Drosos: Meaning “dew” in Greek, symbolizing freshness and purity.
  • Dorotheos: The masculine form of Dorothea, meaning “gift of God.”
  • Dimosthenis: A variant of Demosthenes, resonating with the idea of “people’s strength.”
  • Domenikos: Greek form of Dominic, meaning “belonging to the Lord.”
  • Dike: In Greek mythology, Dike was the goddess of justice and moral order.
  • Daphnis: A shepherd character from Greek mythology, associated with pastoral poetry.
  • Damokles: Famous from the legend of the Sword of Damocles, symbolizing the imminent and ever-present peril faced by those in power.
  • Despoina: Another form of Despina, it translates to “mistress” or “lady” in Greek.
  • Dorina: A feminine form of Dorotheos, meaning “gift of God.”
  • Damian: The English form of Damianos, implying taming or subduing.
  • Danae: In Greek mythology, Danaë was the mother of Perseus by Zeus.
  • Drakon: Meaning “dragon,” a symbol of power and mystery in Greek culture.
  • Dikaios: Translates to “just” or “righteous,” often associated with fairness and morality.
  • Dimokritos: The name of an ancient Greek philosopher, meaning “judge of the people.”
  • Doroteia: A variation of Dorotea, carrying the same meaning of “gift of God.”
  • Dionysos: Referencing the Greek god of wine, festivities, and ecstasy.
  • Didothea: A rare name, possibly a combination of Dido and Thea, meaning “goddess.”
  • Doroteus: The masculine form of Doroteia, meaning “gift of God.”
  • Dryas: In Greek mythology, a Dryas is a type of tree nymph or spirit associated with oak trees.

E

greek names starting with letter E

  1. Eleni: A popular Greek name often associated with the Greek word for “sunshine” or “light.”
  2. Eleftherios: Meaning “free” or “freedom,” this name is associated with liberty and independence.
  3. Evangelos: Translates to “good messenger” or “bearer of good news,” often linked to the spread of the gospel.
  4. Efthimios: Derived from Greek elements meaning “good” and “soul” or “spirit,” suggesting cheerfulness and good nature.
  5. Eudoxia: Meaning “good glory,” this name is associated with someone who has a good reputation or is well-regarded.
  6. Euthymia: Signifies “good spirits” or “well-being,” often used to describe a person with a positive disposition.
  7. Eirene: The Greek word for “peace,” and the name of the Greek goddess of peace.
  8. Efstathios: Meaning “stable” or “steadfast,” indicating a person who is reliable and constant.
  9. Ekaterini: A Greek form of Katherine, meaning “pure” or “clear.”
  10. Eleutheria: Meaning “freedom,” it symbolizes liberty and independence.
  11. Elias: The Greek form of Elijah, meaning “Yahweh is God,” and associated with the biblical prophet.
  12. Euphemia: Means “to speak well” or “of good repute,” suggesting someone who is well-spoken of.
  13. Evdokia: Translates to “good will” or “pleasing,” indicating a person who is well-liked or pleasing to others.
  14. Eftychia: Meaning “happiness” or “good fortune,” often given to someone wished a life of joy.
  15. Elpida: Signifies “hope,” representing optimism and a positive outlook.
  16. Emmanouil: The Greek form of Emmanuel, meaning “God is with us,” reflecting religious significance.
  17. Erasmus: Derived from the Greek word for “beloved,” and the name of a famous saint and scholar.
  18. Ermis: The Greek form of Hermes, the messenger of the gods in Greek mythology.
  19. Efrosini: Meaning “joy” or “mirth,” reflecting a cheerful and joyful personality.
  20. Evgenia: Signifies “well-born” or “noble,” often associated with aristocracy or noble character.
  21. Evripides: A variant of Euripides, the name of a famous ancient Greek playwright.
  22. Elenora: A variation of Eleanor, possibly meaning “compassion” or “light.”
  23. Ermolaos: Meaning “people of Hermes,” associated with the Greek god Hermes.
  24. Evanthia: Signifies “blooming” or “fair flower,” often associated with beauty and growth.
  25. Euphrosyne: One of the three Graces in Greek mythology, representing mirth and joyfulness.
  26. Evita: A diminutive of Eva, meaning “life” or “living one,” associated with vitality.
  27. Ermioni: The Greek form of Hermione, meaning “messenger” or “earthly,” and a character in Greek mythology.
  28. Efimia: A variant of Euphemia, meaning “good speech” or “good reputation.”
  29. Evagoras: Meaning “good” and “assembly,” reflecting leadership or someone who is well-regarded in the community.
  30. Eftichis: A variant of Eftychia, meaning “happiness” or “good luck.”
  31. Euphranor: An ancient Greek artist’s name, meaning “delight” or “mirth.”
  32. Eusebios: Meaning “pious” or “devout,” often associated with religious devotion.
  33. Eulampios: Meaning “shining” or “brilliant,” suggestive of someone who stands out for their brightness or intelligence.
  34. Evaristos: Meaning “most pleasing” or “best,” indicative of someone who excels or is favored.
  35. Epaminondas: An ancient Greek general’s name, meaning “lovely” or “charming.”
  36. Eupraxia: Meaning “good action” or “good conduct,” often associated with virtue and good deeds.
  37. Evmenis: Meaning “good spirit” or “good mood,” reflecting a positive and cheerful disposition.
  38. Eudocia: Signifies “good thought” or “esteemed,” suggesting someone who is well-thought-of.
  39. Euthalia: Meaning “blossoming” or “flourishing,” often associated with growth and prosperity.
  40. Eukleides: The name of a famous ancient Greek mathematician, meaning “good glory.”
  41. Euphronios: Meaning “merry-hearted” or “joyous,” reflecting a happy and light-hearted spirit.
  42. Eulalia: Signifies “sweetly speaking” or “well-spoken,” associated with eloquence and grace.
  43. Euthymios: Meaning “good-spirited” or “cheerful,” indicative of a joyful and positive personality.
  44. Euthychios: Meaning “fortunate” or “prosperous,” often given as a blessing for a good life.
  45. Euphemios: Meaning “good speech” or “good repute,” reflecting a person spoken well of.
  46. Eustratios: Meaning “good army,” often associated with military strength or strategy.
  47. Eukarpia: Meaning “fruitful” or “abundant in fruit,” symbolizing fertility and abundance.
  48. Euthydemos: Meaning “good people” or “well-governed,” reflecting leadership qualities or a well-ordered nature.
  49. Eukratides: The name of an ancient Greek king, meaning “good power” or “strong governance.”
  50. Eudaimonia: Signifies “happiness” or “human flourishing,” a central concept in Greek philosophy.

F

greek names starting with letter F

  • Felix: A Latin name meaning “happy” or “fortunate,” often associated with good luck.
  • Fiona: A Scottish name meaning “white” or “fair,” known for its association with the main female character in the “Shrek” movie series.
  • Fabian: Derived from the Roman clan name Fabius and means “bean-grower” or “bean-seller.”
  • Farrah: An English name derived from the Middle Eastern name Farah, meaning “joy” or “happiness.”
  • Fernando: A Spanish and Portuguese name meaning “adventurous” or “courageous in peace.”
  • Francesca: An Italian name derived from the Latin name Franciscus, meaning “from France” or “free one.”
  • Franklin: An English name meaning “free landholder,” historically denoting someone who owned free land.
  • Freya: Derived from Old Norse, meaning “lady” or “noblewoman,” and the name of the goddess of love, beauty, and fertility in Norse mythology.
  • Finn: An Irish name meaning “fair” or “white,” often associated with the legendary Irish hero Finn MacCool.
  • Felicity: An English name derived from the Latin word felicitas, meaning “good fortune” or “happiness.”
  • Forrest: An English name meaning “woodsman” or “wood,” often associated with someone who lives near a forest.
  • Faith: An English name symbolizing trust or belief, often with a religious connotation.
  • Fabio: An Italian name meaning “bean grower,” derived from the Roman family name Fabius.
  • Fatima: An Arabic name with religious significance in Islam, meaning “captivating” or “a woman who abstains.”
  • Federico: An Italian and Spanish version of Frederick, meaning “peaceful ruler.”
  • Faye: An English name derived from Middle English faie, meaning “fairy.”
  • Fidel: Derived from the Latin word fidelis, meaning “faithful” or “loyal.”
  • Flora: A Latin name meaning “flower,” and the name of the Roman goddess of flowers and spring.
  • Flynn: An Irish name meaning “son of the red-haired one,” often associated with a vibrant personality.
  • Frances: A Latin name meaning “from France” or “free one,” the feminine form of Francis.
  • Franco: An Italian and Spanish name meaning “Frenchman” or “free one.”
  • Frederick: A Germanic name meaning “peaceful ruler,” often associated with leadership and strength.
  • Frida: A German name meaning “peace” or “safety,” popularized by the artist Frida Kahlo.
  • Fergus: A Scottish and Irish name meaning “man of vigor” or “forceful.”
  • Fletcher: An English occupational name for an arrow-maker, derived from Old French flechier.
  • Florence: A Latin name meaning “flourishing” or “prosperous,” often associated with the Italian city.
  • Ford: An English name meaning “river crossing,” often associated with someone who lived near a ford.
  • Forbes: A Scottish name meaning “field” or “district,” often associated with wealth and influence.
  • Fabienne: A French name meaning “bean grower,” the feminine form of Fabian.
  • Fawn: An English name meaning “young deer,” often symbolizing innocence and gentleness.
  • Felipe: A Spanish and Portuguese version of Philip, meaning “friend of horses.”
  • Fernanda: A Spanish and Portuguese name meaning “adventurous” or “bold voyager.”
  • Fintan: An Irish name meaning “white fire” or “white bull,” associated with mythological tales.
  • Fiona: A Scottish name meaning “fair” or “white,” popularized by the character in the “Shrek” series.
  • Foster: An English occupational name for someone who keeps the forest, derived from Old English “fōster.”
  • Franz: A German name meaning “free man,” a variant of Francis.
  • Frederica: A feminine form of Frederick, meaning “peaceful ruler.”
  • Fulvia: A Latin name meaning “yellow,” historically associated with a Roman noblewoman.
  • Fabrizio: An Italian name meaning “craftsman,” derived from the Latin fabricius.
  • Farid: An Arabic name meaning “unique” or “precious,” often associated with rarity and value.
  • Felicia: A Latin name meaning “happy” or “lucky,” the feminine form of Felix.
  • Ferdinand: A Germanic name meaning “bold voyager” or “adventurous.”
  • Fionnuala: An Irish name meaning “white shoulder,” known from Irish legends.
  • Fitzgerald: An Anglo-Norman name meaning “son of Gerald,” historically denoting nobility.
  • Flavio: An Italian name meaning “blond” or “golden-haired,” derived from the Latin flavus.
  • François: A French name meaning “Frenchman” or “free man,” the French form of Francis.
  • Fridtjof: A Scandinavian name meaning “thief of peace” or “peaceful thief,” associated with a Norwegian explorer.
  • Fumiko: A Japanese name meaning “child of abundant beauty,” combining grace and charm.

G

greek names starting with letter G

  • Gabriel: A Hebrew name meaning “God is my strength,” known for being the name of an archangel in Judeo-Christian traditions.
  • Grace: An English name derived from the Latin “gratia,” meaning “favor” or “thanks,” often associated with elegance and poise.
  • Gavin: Of Celtic origin, possibly derived from the medieval name Gawain, meaning “white hawk” or “battle hawk.”
  • Genevieve: A French name of Germanic origin, meaning “woman of the race” or “woman of the people.”
  • George: Of Greek origin, meaning “farmer” or “earth-worker,” associated with the legendary dragon-slaying saint.
  • Georgia: The feminine form of George, also meaning “farmer” or “earth-worker.”
  • Gerald: Of Germanic origin, meaning “rule of the spear,” associated with strength and leadership.
  • Giselle: A German name meaning “pledge” or “hostage,” popularized by the ballet of the same name.
  • Gordon: Of Scottish origin, possibly meaning “spacious fort,” associated with a place name and a clan name.
  • Grace: As mentioned earlier, associated with charm and elegance, and a virtue name.
  • Grant: Of English origin, meaning “tall” or “large,” also associated with the notion of granting or giving.
  • Gregory: Of Greek origin, meaning “watchful” or “alert,” associated with several saints and popes.
  • Greta: A short form of Margareta, meaning “pearl,” popularized by the actress Greta Garbo.
  • Gwendolyn: Of Welsh origin, meaning “white ring” or “blessed ring,” often associated with mythical tales.
  • Gustav: Of Scandinavian origin, meaning “staff of the Goths” or “staff of the gods.”
  • Gabriella: The feminine form of Gabriel, with the same meaning of “God is my strength.”
  • Gage: Of French origin, meaning “pledge” or “oath,” associated with a measure or a guarantee.
  • Galina: Of Russian origin, derived from the Greek “galene,” meaning “calm” or “tranquility.”
  • Garrett: Of Irish origin, meaning “spear strength,” a variant of Gerard.
  • Gemma: Of Italian origin, meaning “gem” or “precious stone,” associated with beauty and value.
  • Geoffrey: Of Germanic origin, meaning “peaceful territory” or “divine peace.”
  • Geraldine: The feminine form of Gerald, meaning “rule of the spear.”
  • Gertrude: Of Germanic origin, meaning “spear of strength,” associated with historical figures and saints.
  • Gilbert: Of Germanic origin, meaning “bright pledge,” associated with nobility and historical figures.
  • Gillian: A variant of Julian, meaning “youthful” or “downy,” popularized in its feminine form.
  • Giorgio: An Italian form of George, meaning “farmer” or “earth-worker.”
  • Giovanni: An Italian form of John, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Gisela: A variant of Giselle, with the same meaning of “pledge” or “hostage.”
  • Giuliana: An Italian form of Juliana, meaning “youthful” or “downy.”
  • Gloria: Of Latin origin, meaning “glory” or “fame,” associated with the concept of praise and honor.
  • Godfrey: Of Germanic origin, meaning “peace of God” or “God’s peace.”
  • Gonzalo: Of Spanish origin, meaning “battle” or “war,” associated with historical figures.
  • Graham: Of Scottish origin, meaning “gravelly homestead,” associated with a place name.
  • Guadalupe: Of Spanish origin, associated with the Virgin Mary, meaning “river of the wolf.”
  • Guillermo: A Spanish form of William, meaning “resolute protector.”
  • Gunnar: Of Scandinavian origin, meaning “warrior” or “soldier,” associated with strength and battle.
  • Gustavo: A variant of Gustav, with the same meaning of “staff of the gods.”
  • Guy: Of French origin, meaning “guide” or “leader,” associated with guidance and leadership.
  • Gwen: A short form of Gwendolyn, meaning “white ring” or “blessed ring.”
  • Gwyneth: Of Welsh origin, meaning “blessed” or “happy,” often associated with the actress Gwyneth Paltrow.
  • Gabrielle: The French feminine form of Gabriel, meaning “God is my strength.”
  • Gael: Of Celtic origin, meaning “a Gaelic person,” associated with the Gaelic culture.
  • Gallagher: Of Irish origin, meaning “descendant of the foreign helper,” associated with strength and assistance.
  • Gaston: Of French origin, meaning “guest” or “foreigner,” often associated with the character from “Beauty and the Beast.”
  • Gene: A short form of Eugene, meaning “noble” or “well-born.”
  • Genesis: Of Greek origin, meaning “beginning” or “birth,” associated with the first book of the Bible.
  • Georgette: The French feminine form of George, meaning “farmer” or “earth-worker.”
  • Gerard: Of Germanic origin, meaning “spear strength,” associated with bravery and protection.
  • Gianni: A short form of Giovanni, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Gilberto: A Spanish and Portuguese form of Gilbert, meaning “bright pledge.”
  • Gina: A short form of names ending in -gina, such as Regina or Georgina, often associated with queenliness or farming.
  • Gino: An Italian diminutive of names ending in -gino, such as Luigino or Ambrogino, often associated with famousness or immortality.
  • Giuseppe: An Italian form of Joseph, meaning “he will add” or “God will increase.”
  • Gladys: Of Welsh origin, meaning “land” or “nation,” possibly derived from the Welsh word “gwlad.”
  • Glynn: Of Welsh origin, meaning “valley,” associated with a geographical feature.
  • Goldie: Of English origin, meaning “gold” or “golden,” often associated with preciousness and value.
  • Greta: As mentioned earlier, a short form of Margareta, meaning “pearl.”
  • Griffin: Of Welsh origin, meaning “strong lord” or “prince,” associated with the mythical creature.

H

greek names starting with letter H

  • Hannah: A Hebrew name meaning “grace” or “favor,” known for its biblical significance as the mother of the prophet Samuel.
  • Harold: An Old English name meaning “leader of the army,” often associated with leadership and strength.
  • Harrison: An English name meaning “son of Harry,” which is a medieval form of Henry, meaning “home ruler.”
  • Harvey: A name of Breton origin, from the name Herve, meaning “battle worthy” or “blazing iron.”
  • Hazel: An English name derived from the hazelnut tree, often associated with the color of hazelnut shells.
  • Heather: An English name taken from the heather plant, known for its pink or purple flowers and its growth in rocky areas.
  • Hector: Of Greek origin, meaning “holding fast,” known for the Trojan prince and hero in the “Iliad” by Homer.
  • Heidi: A German diminutive of Adelheid, meaning “nobility” or “of noble birth.”
  • Helen: Of Greek origin, meaning “light” or “bright,” known for Helen of Troy, whose beauty sparked the Trojan War.
  • Helena: A variant of Helen, with the same meaning of “light” or “bright.”
  • Henry: An English name of Germanic origin, meaning “home ruler” or “ruler of the household.”
  • Hermione: Of Greek origin, meaning “messenger” or “earthly,” also known from the character in the Harry Potter series.
  • Hilda: An Old German name meaning “battle woman” or “warrior.”
  • Hillary: Of Latin origin, meaning “cheerful” or “joyful,” derived from the Latin word “hilaris.”
  • Holden: An English name meaning “hollow valley,” often associated with the protagonist in J.D. Salinger’s novel “The Catcher in the Rye.”
  • Holly: An English name derived from the holly tree, often associated with Christmas and winter.
  • Homer: Of Greek origin, traditionally associated with the ancient Greek poet and author of the “Iliad” and the “Odyssey.”
  • Horace: A Roman name derived from the Latin “Horatius,” meaning “timekeeper” or “has good eyesight.”
  • Howard: Of English origin, meaning “high guardian” or “chief watchman.”
  • Hubert: A German name meaning “bright heart” or “mind,” often associated with intelligence and spirit.
  • Hugo: Of Germanic origin, meaning “mind” or “intellect,” known for the French writer Victor Hugo.
  • Humberto: A Spanish and Portuguese variant of Hubert, with the same meaning of “bright heart” or “mind.”
  • Hunter: An English occupational name for a hunter, often associated with someone who hunts or the hunting profession.
  • Hyacinth: Of Greek origin, from the name of the flower and the mythological character Hyacinthus.
  • Hadley: An English name meaning “heather field,” often associated with a place name.
  • Hailey: A variant of Hayley, meaning “hay field,” often associated with a place name.
  • Hamish: A Scottish form of James, meaning “supplanter” or “one who follows.”
  • Hank: A diminutive of Henry, meaning “home ruler.”
  • Hanna: A variant of Hannah, meaning “grace” or “favor.”
  • Harlan: An English name meaning “rocky land,” often associated with strength and stability.
  • Harper: An English occupational name for someone who plays the harp.
  • Harris: A variant of Harrison, meaning “son of Harry.”
  • Hayden: An English name meaning “hay valley,” often associated with a place name.
  • Heath: An English name meaning “heathland,” often associated with a place name.
  • Helen: As mentioned earlier, meaning “light” or “bright.”
  • Helene: A variant of Helen, with the same meaning of “light” or “bright.”
  • Henrietta: A feminine form of Henry, meaning “home ruler.”
  • Herbert: A German name meaning “illustrious warrior,” often associated with nobility and battle.
  • Hermes: Of Greek origin, the name of the messenger god in Greek mythology, associated with speed and communication.
  • Heston: An English name meaning “brushwood settlement,” often associated with a place name.
  • Hilary: A variant of Hillary, meaning “cheerful” or “joyful.”
  • Hiram: Of Hebrew origin, meaning “exalted brother,” known for its biblical significance.
  • Hollis: An English name meaning “holly trees,” often associated with a place name.
  • Hope: An English virtue name symbolizing optimism and expectation.
  • Hortense: Of Latin origin, meaning “gardener,” derived from the name of the Roman goddess Hortensia.
  • Houston: An English name meaning “Hugh’s town,” often associated with a place name.
  • Hugh: Of Germanic origin, meaning “mind,” “spirit,” or “intellect.”
  • Humphrey: An English name meaning “peaceful warrior,” often associated with peace and protection.
  • Hyun: A Korean name meaning “virtuous” or “able,” often associated with talent and morality.

I

greek names starting with letter I

  • Isaac: A Hebrew name meaning “he will laugh” or “he will rejoice,” known for its biblical significance as the son of Abraham and Sarah.
  • Isabella: An Italian and Spanish variant of Elizabeth, meaning “pledged to God,” popular throughout history and royalty.
  • Ivan: A Slavic variant of John, meaning “God is gracious,” common in Russia and other Slavic countries.
  • Irene: Of Greek origin, meaning “peace,” the name of a Greek goddess and several saints.
  • Ian: A Scottish variant of John, meaning “God is gracious,” a popular name in Scotland.
  • Iliana: A name of Greek origin, possibly meaning “from Troy” or “sun,” a feminine form of Ilias.
  • Igor: Of Russian and Old Norse origin, meaning “warrior of peace” or “protected.”
  • Ingrid: A Scandinavian name meaning “beautiful” or “fair,” associated with the Norse god Ing.
  • Isaiah: A Hebrew name meaning “salvation of the Lord,” known for its biblical significance as a prophet.
  • Isidore: Of Greek origin, meaning “gift of Isis,” the name of several saints.
  • Imogen: Of Celtic origin, possibly meaning “maiden” or “innocent,” popularized by Shakespeare’s play “Cymbeline.”
  • Iona: A Scottish name derived from the name of a small island in the Hebrides, known for its historic monastery.
  • Ira: A Hebrew name meaning “watchful,” in the Bible, Ira is one of King David’s warriors.
  • Irina: A Russian variant of Irene, meaning “peace,” the name of several saints and royalty.
  • Ismael: A variant of Ishmael, of Hebrew origin, meaning “God will hear,” known for its biblical significance.
  • Ivy: An English name derived from the ivy plant, associated with fidelity and eternity.
  • Ida: Of Germanic origin, meaning “industrious one” or “prosperous,” the name of a mountain in Greek mythology.
  • Ignatius: Of Latin origin, possibly meaning “fiery one,” the name of several saints and historical figures.
  • Ines: A Spanish and Portuguese variant of Agnes, meaning “pure” or “holy.”
  • India: An English name derived from the name of the country, often associated with exoticness and diversity.
  • Indigo: An English name taken from the color or the dye of the same name, associated with deep blue and intuition.
  • Inez: A variant of Ines, with the same meaning of “pure” or “holy.”
  • Innocent: Of Latin origin, meaning “harmless” or “innocent,” the name of several popes.
  • Iola: A Welsh name meaning “valued by the Lord,” often associated with worth and spirituality.
  • Iona: As mentioned earlier, derived from the name of a small island in Scotland.
  • Ira: As mentioned earlier, a Hebrew name meaning “watchful.”
  • Irina: As mentioned earlier, a Russian variant of Irene, meaning “peace.”
  • Irma: Of German origin, meaning “whole” or “universal,” associated with completeness and the world.
  • Irving: A Scottish name derived from a place name, meaning “green water” or “sea friend.”
  • Isa: A short form of names beginning with Isa-, often used independently, and also an Arabic name meaning “Jesus.”
  • Isabel: A variant of Isabella, meaning “pledged to God.”
  • Isadora: Of Greek origin, meaning “gift of Isis,” the feminine form of Isidore.
  • Ishmael: Of Hebrew origin, meaning “God will hear,” known for its biblical significance as the son of Abraham.
  • Isolde: Of Welsh origin, possibly meaning “ice ruler,” known from the Tristan and Isolde legend.
  • Israel: Of Hebrew origin, meaning “he who struggles with God,” known for its biblical significance as the name given to Jacob.
  • Itzel: A Mayan name meaning “rainbow lady” or “star of the aurora sky.”
  • Ivan: As mentioned earlier, a Slavic variant of John, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Ivanna: A feminine form of Ivan, with the same meaning of “God is gracious.”
  • Ivette: A French variant of Yvette, possibly meaning “yew” or “archer,” the feminine form of Yves.
  • Ivo: Of Germanic origin, meaning “yew” or “archer,” associated with the yew tree used for making bows.
  • Ivy: As mentioned earlier, derived from the ivy plant, symbolizing fidelity and eternity.
  • Idris: Of Welsh and Arabic origin, in Welsh it means “ardent lord” and in Arabic it’s associated with a prophet’s name.
  • Ignacio: A Spanish variant of Ignatius, meaning “fiery one.”
  • Ilana: Of Hebrew origin, meaning “tree,” associated with growth and nature.
  • Ilario: An Italian variant of Hilary, meaning “cheerful” or “happy.”
  • Ileana: A Romanian variant of Helen, meaning “light” or “bright.”
  • Ilya: A Russian variant of Elijah, meaning “my God is Yahweh.”
  • Imani: Of Arabic origin, meaning “faith,” often associated with spiritual belief and trust.
  • Ina: A diminutive of names ending in -ina, often used as an independent name.
  • India: As mentioned earlier, derived from the name of the country.
  • Indira: Of Sanskrit origin, meaning “beauty” or “splendid,” associated with the Hindu goddess Lakshmi.
  • Ingrid: As mentioned earlier, a Scandinavian name meaning “beautiful” or “fair.”
  • Ioannis: A Greek variant of John, meaning “God is gracious.”

J

greek names starting with letter J

  • Jason: A mythological Greek hero famous for leading the Argonauts and seeking the Golden Fleece.
  • Janus: Adapted from Roman mythology, representing the god of beginnings, gates, transitions, time, duality, doorways, passages, and endings.
  • Jocasta: In Greek mythology, she was the queen of Thebes and the mother of Oedipus.
  • Janae: A modern adaptation, possibly derived from the Greek name Ioanna, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Jannis: A variant of Yiannis, the Greek form of John, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Janika: A diminutive form, potentially derived from Ioanna or other Greek names beginning with Ioan-.
  • Jorgos: A variant of Georgios, meaning “farmer” or “earth-worker.”
  • Jeno: Likely a variant of Eugenios, meaning “well-born” or “noble.”
  • Jelena: A Greek form of Helen, meaning “light” or “bright.”
  • Jorja: An adaptation of Georgia, the feminine form of Georgios, meaning “farmer.”
  • Janessa: A modern creation, possibly combining Jan (from Ioanna) with the common suffix -essa.
  • Jelina: Likely derived from Helena, meaning “light” or “torch.”
  • Joros: Possibly a variant form of Georgios, meaning “farmer” or “earth-worker.”
  • Janthia: A unique adaptation, potentially related to the Greek word for “violet flower.”
  • Jelani: Likely a modern adaptation with no direct Greek origin, possibly influenced by other cultures.
  • Janan: A name of uncertain Greek origin, potentially a modern adaptation.
  • Jasen: A variant of Jason, referencing the mythological Greek hero.
  • Jelisaveta: A variant of Elisavet, the Greek form of Elizabeth, meaning “God is my oath.”
  • Jantho: Possibly a modern creation or adaptation with no clear Greek origin.
  • Jelios: Likely a modern name, potentially derived from Greek elements but with no specific meaning.
  • Jana: A variant of Ioanna, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Jano: Possibly an adaptation of Ioannis, the Greek form of John, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Jaleos: A modern creation, possibly inspired by Greek sounds but with no specific meaning.
  • Janni: A diminutive form of Ioannis, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Jelio: Likely a modern, phonetically inspired name with no clear Greek origin.
  • Janakis: A diminutive or familial form, possibly derived from Ioannis or related names.
  • Janko: A diminutive form, potentially related to Ioannis or similar names.
  • Janaia: A modern adaptation, potentially combining elements from Greek names with ‘Jan-‘.
  • Janesis: A creative modern name, possibly inspired by the Greek word for “beginning.”
  • Jemina: Likely a modern name, influenced by Greek sounds but with no specific Greek origin.
  • Jorios: A variant of Georgios, meaning “farmer” or “earth-worker.”
  • Jenoa: A modern adaptation, potentially influenced by Greek names but without a direct Greek origin.
  • Jalex: A contemporary creation, possibly combining Greek elements in a new way.
  • Jandros: Likely a modern adaptation, influenced by Greek names like Alexandros.
  • Jantia: A creative modern name, possibly inspired by Greek sounds but without a clear origin.
  • Jemios: A unique name, likely a modern creation with Greek phonetic influences.
  • Jathon: Possibly a variant or modern creation related to Greek names with ‘Ath-‘.
  • Jalius: A modern adaptation, potentially inspired by Greek names but with no specific origin.
  • Jantina: A modern name, possibly influenced by Greek phonetics or naming patterns.
  • Jelis: Potentially a modern variant of Elis, a Greek name meaning “kind” or “rational.”
  • Jantaras: Likely a modern, phonetically inspired name with no specific Greek origin.
  • Jelena: A Greek form of Helen, meaning “light” or “bright.”
  • Jelissa: A modern combination, possibly derived from Greek names with ‘Elis-‘.
  • Janae: A variant of Ioanna, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Jandris: Likely a modern adaptation, potentially inspired by Greek names like Alexandros.
  • Jalea: A creative modern name, possibly inspired by Greek phonetics but with no clear origin.
  • Janis: A variant of Ioannis, meaning “God is gracious.”

K

greek names starting with letter K

  • Kallisto: A name of Greek origin meaning “most beautiful,” often associated with a nymph in Greek mythology.
  • Kassandra: Derives from Greek mythology, meaning “she who entangles men,” famously known as the daughter of King Priam of Troy who had the gift of prophecy.
  • Konstantinos: A traditional Greek name meaning “steadfast” or “constant,” often associated with the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great.
  • Kyriaki: Means “of the Lord” in Greek, commonly used to refer to Sunday, the Lord’s day.
  • Kostas: A common diminutive of Konstantinos, symbolizing steadiness or constancy.
  • Kleio: Derived from Greek mythology, meaning “glory,” and is one of the nine Muses representing history.
  • Katerina: A popular Greek name meaning “pure,” often associated with the Greek form of Catherine.
  • Konstantina: The feminine form of Konstantinos, meaning “constant” or “steadfast.”
  • Kyriakos: Means “of the Lord,” often used for boys born on a Sunday.
  • Kalliope: In Greek mythology, the muse of epic poetry, with the name meaning “beautiful voice.”
  • Kostis: Another diminutive of Konstantinos, emphasizing steadfastness and reliability.
  • Kiriakos: A variant of Kyriakos, meaning “of the Lord,” often linked to religious significance.
  • Kleopatra: A name of Greek origin meaning “glory of the father,” famously borne by the Egyptian queen.
  • Kyveli: A unique Greek name, the meaning of which is less clear but often associated with grace and beauty.
  • Kriton: Derived from Greek, meaning “judge” or “decision,” often linked to moral judgment.
  • Kleitos: A Greek name meaning “called forth” or “chosen,” noted in ancient Greek history and myths.
  • Kyriacos: A variation of Kyriakos, meaning “of the Lord,” commonly used in religious contexts.
  • Koralia: A modern Greek name likely derived from “coral,” symbolizing the beauty of the sea.
  • Kallias: An ancient Greek name meaning “beauty,” often found in historical texts.
  • Konstadinos: A variant of Konstantinos, emphasizing constancy and steadfastness.
  • Kyros: Meaning “lord” or “master,” often associated with the ancient Persian kings like Cyrus the Great.
  • Kleomenes: An ancient Greek name, possibly meaning “famous” or “glorious,” borne by several historical figures.
  • Kyprianos: A name related to Cyprus, often linked to Saint Cyprian.
  • Kallistrate: A unique Greek name combining “beauty” and “army,” possibly symbolizing strategic beauty.
  • Konstantis: Another variant of Konstantinos, emphasizing the theme of constancy.
  • Kyparissia: A name that may be derived from the cypress tree, often associated with mourning in Greek culture.
  • Kyriazis: A variant of Kyriakos, translating to “of the Lord,” signifying a spiritual connection.
  • Kallirhoe: A name from Greek mythology meaning “beautiful flow,” often associated with water nymphs.
  • Kostantina: A variant of Konstantina, symbolizing steadiness or constancy.
  • Klearchos: An ancient Greek name meaning “glorious ruler,” often associated with military leadership.
  • Kalypso: From Greek mythology, meaning “she who hides,” famously associated with the nymph who detained Odysseus.
  • Kostandinos: A variant spelling of Konstantinos, emphasizing the qualities of steadfastness and reliability.
  • Kriti: A name possibly derived from the Greek island of Crete, symbolizing the beauty and history of the region.
  • Kyrillos: Derived from Greek, meaning “lordly” or “masterful,” often associated with leadership.
  • Kalligenia: A unique Greek name meaning “beautiful birth” or “born of beauty.”
  • Kassiopeia: From Greek mythology, meaning “cassia juice,” associated with a queen who boasted about her unrivaled beauty.
  • Kostandina: A variant of Konstantina, carrying the meaning of constancy and steadfastness.
  • Kallipateira: A historic Greek name, known from a woman who defied tradition to watch her son compete at the Olympic Games.
  • Kallisthenes: An ancient Greek name meaning “beautiful strength,” known from a historian who accompanied Alexander the Great.
  • Kostas: A common Greek diminutive of Konstantinos, symbolizing reliability and constancy.

L

greek names starting with letter L

  1. Labros: A Greek name often associated with the word for “talkative” or “eloquent.”
  2. Lachesis: In Greek mythology, Lachesis is one of the Three Fates who determines the length of the thread of life.
  3. Lais: A name possibly of Greek origin, recalling the ancient courtesan Lais of Corinth.
  4. Lala: A name with Slavic origins, meaning “tulip,” or used as a diminutive of Eulalia, which means “sweetly speaking.”
  5. Lampros: A Greek name meaning “bright” or “shining,” often associated with radiance.
  6. Lana: A name of multiple origins, often considered as a short form of Alana or Svetlana, meaning “light” or “precious.”
  7. Lanthia: A name of Greek origin, possibly derived from “lanthano,” meaning “to escape notice” or “to be hidden.”
  8. Lara: A name with multiple origins, in Roman mythology, Lara was a nymph, and the name also means “cheerful” in Russian.
  9. Larisa: A Greek name possibly meaning “citadel” or “fortified town,” also the name of a city in Greece.
  10. Laskarina: A Greek name that may derive from “Lascar,” a term for a sailor or soldier, and also associated with the Greek heroine Laskarina Bouboulina.
  11. Leda: In Greek mythology, Leda is known for being seduced by Zeus in the form of a swan.
  12. Leena: A variant of Lena or Helena, meaning “light” or “torch” in Greek.
  13. Lefteris: A Greek name meaning “free” or “freedom,” a variant of Eleftherios.
  14. Leia: Popularized by “Star Wars,” Leia may also be a variant of Leah, meaning “weary” in Hebrew.
  15. Lena: A name of multiple origins, often used as a short form for names ending in -lena, meaning “light” or “torch” in Greek.
  16. Leon: A Greek name meaning “lion,” associated with strength and courage.
  17. Leona: A feminine form of Leon, meaning “lioness” in Latin, symbolizing strength and fierceness.
  18. Leonardos: A Greek variant of Leonard, meaning “brave as a lion.”
  19. Leonidas: A Greek name meaning “son of a lion,” known for the Spartan king who fought at the Battle of Thermopylae.
  20. Leonora: A variant of Eleanor, possibly meaning “light” or “compassion” and associated with the medieval tale of “Leontius and Symeon.”
  21. Leontia: A Greek name meaning “lion-like,” associated with bravery.
  22. Leontios: A Greek name meaning “like a lion,” often associated with strength and courage.
  23. Leto: In Greek mythology, Leto is the mother of Apollo and Artemis, and the name means “the hidden one.”
  24. Lev: A name of Slavic origin meaning “lion,” also a variant of Leo.
  25. Lia: A variant of Leah, meaning “weary” in Hebrew, or a short form of names like Rosalia.
  26. Liana: A name of multiple origins, often associated with the vine known as liana or used as a short form of Juliana.
  27. Lida: A variant of Lydia or a short form of names like Alida, meaning “noble” or “kind.”
  28. Lila: A name of multiple origins, meaning “play” or “amusement” in Sanskrit and associated with the color purple in English.
  29. Lilika: A Greek diminutive of names like Elizabeth, meaning “God is my oath.”
  30. Lina: A name of multiple origins, often used as a diminutive of names ending in -lina and meaning “tender” or “palm tree” in Arabic.
  31. Linos: A Greek name meaning “lamentation,” also the name of a mythological poet and musician.
  32. Linus: A Greek name meaning “flax,” known for the mythological character who taught music to Hercules.
  33. Lisa: A short form of Elizabeth, meaning “God is my oath,” popularized in Western cultures.
  34. Lito: A variant of Leto, referring to the Greek goddess who is the mother of Apollo and Artemis.
  35. Litsa: A Greek diminutive of names like Elisavet, meaning “God is my oath.”
  36. Lizeta: A Greek diminutive of Elizabeth, meaning “God is my oath.”
  37. Loida: A variant of Leda, possibly meaning “woman” or related to the Greek mythological figure.
  38. Lola: A Spanish diminutive of Dolores, meaning “sorrows,” often associated with the Virgin Mary.
  39. Loucas: A Greek form of Lucas or Luke, meaning “from Lucania” or “light.”
  40. Loucia: A feminine form of Loucas, meaning “light” in Greek.
  41. Louisa: A feminine form of Louis, meaning “famous warrior” in Germanic languages.
  42. Loukas: A Greek variant of Luke, meaning “from Lucania” or “light.”
  43. Loukia: A feminine form of Loukas, meaning “light” in Greek.
  44. Loukianos: A Greek form of Lucian, meaning “light” or “born at dawn.”
  45. Loula: A Greek diminutive of names like Eulalia, meaning “sweetly speaking” or “well-spoken.”
  46. Lourdes: A French place name, associated with the Virgin Mary and meaning “craggy slope” or “fortified place.”
  47. Lydia: A Greek name meaning “woman from Lydia” or “beautiful one,” associated with the ancient region of Lydia in Asia Minor.
  48. Lykourgos: A Greek name meaning “wolf-work” or “deed of a wolf,” known for the Spartan lawgiver.

M

greek names starting with letter M

  • Melina: Meaning “honey” or “sweet as honey.”
  • Marios: Greek form of Marius, possibly meaning “male.”
  • Myron: Meaning “myrrh,” “fragrant oil.”
  • Margarita: Greek form of Margaret, meaning “pearl.”
  • Manolis: Diminutive of Emmanuel, meaning “God is with us.”
  • Marinos: Meaning “of the sea.”
  • Markos: Greek form of Marcus, meaning “warlike.”
  • Melissa: Meaning “honeybee.”
  • Menelaos: Meaning “withstanding the people,” from Greek mythology.
  • Michalis: Greek form of Michael, meaning “who is like God?”
  • Minas: Short form of names ending in -minas, possibly meaning “moon.”
  • Myrto: Derived from the name of the myrtle plant.
  • Melpomene: Name of the Greek muse of tragedy.
  • Methoni: After the town in Greece, possibly meaning “forehead” or “brow.”
  • Mnason: An ancient Greek name, mentioned in the New Testament.
  • Merope: One of the Pleiades in Greek mythology.
  • Miltiades: An ancient Greek name meaning “red earth.”
  • Makarios: Meaning “blessed” or “happy.”
  • Magdalini: Variant of Magdalene, meaning “of Magdala.”
  • Meletios: Meaning “careful” or “attentive.”
  • Meliton: Possibly meaning “little sweet one.”
  • Merope: From Greek mythology, one of the Pleiades.
  • Moschos: Meaning “calf” or “young shoot.”
  • Myrsini: Meaning “myrtle.”
  • Mandragoras: Meaning “sleep-inducing,” also the name of a plant.
  • Marika: Diminutive of Maria, meaning “bitter” or “beloved.”
  • Matthaios: Greek form of Matthew, meaning “gift of God.”
  • Melesigenes: An epithet for Homer, meaning “born of Meles.”
  • Melanthios: Meaning “black flower.”
  • Melantho: Meaning “black flower,” a name from Greek mythology.
  • Melina: Meaning “honey” or “sweet as honey.”
  • Menexenos: An ancient Greek name.
  • Merope: A star nymph in Greek mythology.
  • Metrophanes: Meaning “mother-appearing.”
  • Michail: Variant of Michael, meaning “who is like God?”
  • Mneme: One of the three original Muses in Greek mythology.
  • Mykolas: Greek form of Nicholas, meaning “victory of the people.”
  • Myrina: Name of an ancient Greek city, possibly meaning “swiftly bounding.”
  • Mystis: Meaning “initiated one.”
  • Mythos: Meaning “story” or “legend.”
  • Makis: Diminutive of names ending in -makis.
  • Manos: Diminutive of Emmanuel, meaning “God is with us.”
  • Mantas: Possibly a variant of Mantios, meaning “prophet” or “seer.”
  • Marcellus: A Roman name adopted into Greek, meaning “little warrior.”
  • Marios: Greek form of Marius, possibly meaning “male.”
  • Marsyas: A satyr in Greek mythology.
  • Maximos: Meaning “greatest.”
  • Medousa: Meaning “guardian,” known as Medusa in Greek mythology.
  • Megakles: Meaning “great glory.”
  • Meles: An ancient Greek name, possibly meaning “honey.”

N

greek names starting with letter N

  • Nikolaos: Meaning “victory of the people.”
  • Nektarios: Derived from the Greek word “nektar,” the drink of the gods, meaning “nectar.”
  • Nikos: Short form of Nikolaos, meaning “victory of the people.”
  • Nikitas: Meaning “victorious.”
  • Nikiforos: Meaning “bearer of victory.”
  • Nereus: In Greek mythology, a sea god known as the “Old Man of the Sea.”
  • Nausicaa: From Homer’s “Odyssey,” meaning “burner of ships.”
  • Narcissus: From Greek mythology, a youth who fell in love with his own reflection, where the term “narcissism” originates.
  • Nestor: Meaning “homecoming” or “traveler,” also a wise king of Pylos in Greek mythology.
  • Nikodemos: Meaning “victory of the people.”
  • Nikola: Feminine form of Nikolaos, meaning “victory of the people.”
  • Natasa: Short form of Anastasia, meaning “resurrection.”
  • Nymphodora: Meaning “gift of the nymphs.”
  • Nikandros: Meaning “victory of a man.”
  • Nikolaos: Meaning “victory of the people.”
  • Nikomedes: Meaning “victory-scheme.”
  • Nikostratos: Meaning “victory-army.”
  • Nomiki: Derived from the Greek word “nomos,” meaning “law.”
  • Nona: Possibly derived from the ninth (nona in Latin), or a variant of the name Ioanna.
  • Nymphas: Meaning “bridegroom” or “young man,” mentioned in the New Testament.
  • Nausika: A variant of Nausicaa, meaning “burner of ships.”
  • Neoklis: Meaning “new fame” or “new glory.”
  • Neophytos: Meaning “newly planted,” referring to a novice in a religious order.
  • Nereida: Feminine form of Nereus, referring to the daughters of the sea god Nereus in Greek mythology.
  • Nikolaas: A variant of Nikolaos, meaning “victory of the people.”
  • Nikolai: A variant of Nikolaos, meaning “victory of the people.”
  • Nikias: Meaning “victory.”
  • Nikolaides: Meaning “son of Nikolaos” or “descendant of the victorious one.”
  • Nikona: Feminine form of Nikon, meaning “victory.”
  • Nilos: Greek form of the name Nile, the river in Egypt, possibly meaning “valley.”
  • Nireus: A name from Greek mythology, known for his beauty.
  • Nisos: Meaning “island,” also a figure in Greek mythology.
  • Niobe: In Greek mythology, a woman who was turned into stone while weeping for her children.
  • Niketas: Meaning “victory.”
  • Nikolaides: Meaning “son of Nikolaos” or “descendant of the victorious one.”
  • Nikos: Short form of Nikolaos, meaning “victory of the people.”
  • Nikosthenes: An ancient Greek name, possibly meaning “victory-strength.”
  • Nikotimos: Meaning “victory-honor.”
  • Nikou: Feminine form of Nikos, meaning “victory.”
  • Nisos: Meaning “island,” also a figure in Greek mythology.
  • Nikaia: Feminine form of Nikaios, meaning “victory.”
  • Nikandros: Meaning “victory of a man.”
  • Nikanor: Meaning “victory of a man.”
  • Nikias: Meaning “victory.”
  • Nikodemos: Meaning “victory of the people.”
  • Nikoleta: Feminine form of Nikolaos, meaning “victory of the people.”
  • Nikomedes: Meaning “victory-scheme.”
  • Nikomachos: Meaning “victory-battle.”
  • Nikosthenes: An ancient Greek name, possibly meaning “victory-strength.”
  • Nikotimos: Meaning “victory-honor.”

O

greek names starting with letter O

  • Olympia: Feminine form of Olympios, meaning “from Mount Olympus,” the home of the gods.
  • Odysseus: The hero of Homer’s epic “The Odyssey,” known for his intelligence and resourcefulness.
  • Orestes: Meaning “mountain dweller,” known from Greek mythology and the tragic plays of Euripides and Aeschylus.
  • Orion: A hunter in Greek mythology, placed among the stars as a constellation.
  • Ophelia: Derived from the Greek word “ophelos,” meaning “help” or “benefit.”
  • Oceanus: The name of the Titan god of the ocean in Greek mythology.
  • Othello: Although not traditionally Greek, it is the name of a character in Shakespeare’s play, possibly derived from the Greek “Otho.”
  • Octavia: A Roman name meaning “eighth,” used in ancient Greek-speaking areas of the Roman Empire.
  • Olympiodoros: Meaning “gift of Olympus.”
  • Olympias: The mother of Alexander the Great, meaning “from Olympus.”
  • Onesimus: Meaning “beneficial,” “profitable,” known from the New Testament.
  • Ourania: Meaning “heavenly,” the Greek form of Urania, one of the nine Muses.
  • Orestis: A variant of Orestes, meaning “mountain dweller.”
  • Orpheus: A legendary musician and poet in Greek mythology who could charm all living things with his music.
  • Orthia: Derived from the Greek word “orthos,” meaning “straight” or “upright.”
  • Olena: Greek form of Helen, meaning “torch” or “bright.”
  • Ophelos: Meaning “help” or “benefit.”
  • Oriana: Although not traditionally Greek, it’s included due to its similarity to Ourania, meaning “dawn” or “golden.”
  • Otho: An ancient Greek name, a variant of Otto, meaning “wealthy.”
  • Olympios: Meaning “from Mount Olympus,” the home of the gods.
  • Olynthos: Name of an ancient Greek city, possibly meaning “fig.”
  • Oinone: In Greek mythology, Oenone was a mountain nymph.
  • Oikonomos: Meaning “household manager” or “steward.”
  • Okeanos: The ancient Greek name of Oceanus, the Titan god of the ocean.
  • Olethros: Meaning “destruction” or “ruin.”
  • Omiros: Greek form of Homer, the legendary ancient Greek poet.
  • Onoufrios: Greek form of Onuphrius, meaning “good cheer.”
  • Ops: The Greek form of Opis, a goddess of fertility and the earth in Greek and Roman mythology.
  • Origen: Derived from the Greek “oros” meaning “mountain” combined with “genes” meaning “born.”
  • Orsino: Although not traditionally Greek, it’s included due to its similarity to the Greek name Orsinos, meaning “bear.”
  • Oulixes: An ancient Greek form of Odysseus.
  • Ourea: Referring to the primordial gods of the mountains in Greek mythology.
  • Ostratos: Meaning “army.”
  • Ophion: A primordial serpent in Greek mythology.
  • Olympiada: Meaning “Olympic Games” or “from Olympus.”
  • Olympianos: Meaning “from Mount Olympus” or “pertaining to the Olympic Games.”
  • Oriades: Referring to the mountain nymphs in Greek mythology.
  • Othrys: Name of a mountain in Greek mythology, where the Titans were said to dwell.
  • Oureas: Another form of Ourea, referring to the mountain gods.
  • Oionos: Meaning “eagle.”
  • Ogygos: The name of a legendary king of Boeotia, the region of Thebes in ancient Greece.
  • Oistros: Meaning “gadfly” or “frenzy.”
  • Olenos: The name of a city in ancient Greece, also a figure in Greek mythology.
  • Onesiphoros: Meaning “bringing profit” or “beneficial,” known from the New Testament.
  • Onisimos: A variant of Onesimus, meaning “beneficial” or “profitable.”
  • Onesiphoros: Meaning “bringing profit” or “beneficial,” from the New Testament.
  • Orestilla: A feminine form of Orestes, meaning “mountain dweller.”
  • Orithyia: In Greek mythology, a princess abducted by Boreas, the god of the north wind.
  • Oroites: An ancient Greek name.
  • Orodes: An ancient Greek name, possibly related to the Persian name Orod, meaning “son of the mountain.”

P

greek names starting with letter P

  • Panagiotis: Meaning “all-holy.”
  • Petros: Greek form of Peter, meaning “rock” or “stone.”
  • Penelope: In Greek mythology, the faithful wife of Odysseus.
  • Persephone: The queen of the underworld in Greek mythology, daughter of Demeter.
  • Paris: In Greek mythology, the prince of Troy who abducted Helen, leading to the Trojan War.
  • Phoebe: Meaning “bright” or “pure,” also the name of a Titaness in Greek mythology.
  • Philippos: Meaning “friend of horses.”
  • Phaedra: Meaning “bright” or “radiant,” known from Greek mythology and Euripides’ play.
  • Pavlos: Greek form of Paul, meaning “small” or “humble.”
  • Pelagia: Meaning “of the sea.”
  • Pandora: Meaning “all gifts,” known from Greek mythology as the first woman on Earth.
  • Panos: Diminutive of Panagiotis, meaning “all-holy.”
  • Panteleimon: Meaning “all-compassionate.”
  • Petros: Greek form of Peter, meaning “rock” or “stone.”
  • Platon: Greek form of Plato, meaning “broad-shouldered.”
  • Polyxeni: Meaning “very hospitable” (from “poly” meaning “much” and “xenia” meaning “hospitality”).
  • Prokopios: Meaning “progress.”
  • Ptolemaios: The name of a line of Egyptian pharaohs of Macedonian Greek origin, meaning “warlike.”
  • Pythagoras: The famous ancient Greek mathematician and philosopher.
  • Pyrrhos: Meaning “flame-colored,” “red.”
  • Parthena: Meaning “maiden” or “virgin,” referring to the Parthenon temple dedicated to Athena.
  • Pascalina: Feminine form of Paschalis, meaning “relating to Easter” or “Passover.”
  • Paschalis: Meaning “relating to Easter” or “Passover.”
  • Patroklos: Meaning “glory of the father,” known from Homer’s “Iliad.”
  • Pegasos: The winged horse of Greek mythology.
  • Pelopidas: Meaning “island of Pelops,” a Theban general and statesman.
  • Perikles: Meaning “far-famed,” an Athenian statesman during the Golden Age of Athens.
  • Perseus: A hero in Greek mythology who slayed Medusa.
  • Petrosinella: A diminutive form of Petra, meaning “small rock.”
  • Phaedon: Meaning “bright” or “shining.”
  • Phaenna: One of the Charites (Graces) in Greek mythology.
  • Phanagoras: An ancient Greek name.
  • Philemon: Meaning “affectionate,” known from the New Testament.
  • Philippa: Feminine form of Philippos, meaning “friend of horses.”
  • Philomena: Meaning “lover of strength.”
  • Photios: Meaning “light” or “enlightened.”
  • Phyllis: A woman who died for love in Greek mythology.
  • Pindaros: The name of a famous ancient Greek lyric poet.
  • Placida: Feminine form of Placidus, meaning “calm” or “gentle.”
  • Polydeuces: Known as Pollux in Latin, one of the Dioscuri twins in Greek mythology.
  • Polymnia: One of the Muses in Greek mythology, representing sacred poetry.
  • Polykrates: An ancient Greek name meaning “much power.”
  • Polyxena: In Greek mythology, a daughter of Priam, king of Troy.
  • Praxiteles: A famous ancient Greek sculptor.
  • Proserpina: The Latinized form of Persephone, the queen of the underworld in Greek mythology.
  • Proteus: A sea god in Greek mythology known for his ability to change shape.
  • Pyrrhus: An alternative spelling of Pyrrhos, meaning “flame-colored,” “red.”
  • Pylades: A friend of Orestes in Greek mythology, known for his loyalty.
  • Pythias: The name of the priestess of Apollo at Delphi, also known as the Oracle of Delphi.
  • Pelops: A legendary king of Pisa in the Peloponnese, after whom the region is named.

Q

greek names starting with letter Q

  • Quintus: A Roman name meaning “fifth” in Latin, occasionally used in Greek-speaking areas of the Roman Empire.
  • Quirinus: An ancient Roman god, sometimes identified with Romulus. The name was used in Greek-speaking areas of the Roman Empire.
  • Quirina: Feminine form of Quirinus, used in Greek-speaking areas of the Roman Empire.\

R

greek names starting with letter R

  • Rhea: In Greek mythology, the mother of Zeus and other Olympian gods.
  • Rhoda: Meaning “rose” in Greek.
  • Roxana: Derived from the Greek “Roxane,” meaning “dawn” or “bright.”
  • Rhodian: Pertaining to the island of Rhodes.
  • Raisa: While not traditionally Greek, it is sometimes used in Greek-speaking communities and is of Hebrew origin, meaning “rose.”
  • Raphael: From the Hebrew name Refael, but used in Greek-speaking cultures, meaning “God has healed.”
  • Rufus: A Latin name meaning “red-haired,” used in Greek-speaking regions during the Roman era.
  • Raisa: A name of Hebrew origin meaning “rose,” adopted in Greek-speaking communities.
  • Rhadamanthos: One of the judges of the dead in Greek mythology.
  • Rhesos: A Thracian king from Greek mythology.
  • Rhetta: A name of uncertain origin, possibly used in Greek-speaking communities.
  • Rhodanthe: Meaning “rose flower” in Greek.
  • Rhode: A nymph in Greek mythology associated with the island of Rhodes.
  • Rhodope: A mountain range in Southeastern Europe, also a figure in Greek mythology.
  • Rhodos: An alternative name for the island of Rhodes.
  • Riginos: An ancient Greek name.
  • Rogiros: An ancient Greek name, possibly a Hellenized form of a foreign name.
  • Romaioi: Meaning “Romans,” used historically to refer to Greek Orthodox Christians in the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire.
  • Romilos: A variant of Romulus, the legendary founder of Rome, occasionally used in Greek-speaking areas.
  • Roussa: A modern Greek name meaning “red-haired” or “russet.”

S

greek names starting with letter S

  • Sofia: Meaning “wisdom.”
  • Stavros: Meaning “cross.”
  • Stefanos: Greek form of Stephen, meaning “crown” or “wreath.”
  • Spiridon: Meaning “spirit.”
  • Sokratis: Greek form of Socrates, the famous philosopher.
  • Stylianos: Meaning “pillar” or “column.”
  • Sotiria: Feminine form of Sotirios, meaning “salvation.”
  • Sotirios: Meaning “salvation.”
  • Straton: Meaning “army.”
  • Sevastianos: Greek form of Sebastian, meaning “venerable” or “revered.”
  • Sappho: Name of the famous ancient Greek poetess.
  • Selene: Greek goddess of the moon.
  • Sergios: Greek form of Sergius, possibly meaning “servant.”
  • Silas: Short form of Silvanus, known from the New Testament.
  • Simos: Diminutive of Simon, meaning “flat-nosed.”
  • Simeon: Greek form of Simon, meaning “he has heard.”
  • Sophronia: Feminine form of Sophronios, meaning “self-controlled.”
  • Sophronios: Meaning “self-controlled.”
  • Stamatia: Feminine form of Stamatis, meaning “stop.”
  • Stamatis: Meaning “stop.”
  • Stathis: Short form of Eustathios, meaning “stable.”
  • Stelios: Diminutive of Stylianos, meaning “pillar” or “column.”
  • Stephanie: Feminine form of Stefanos, meaning “crown” or “wreath.”
  • Stilianos: Variant of Stylianos, meaning “pillar” or “column.”
  • Syntyche: Meaning “common fate” or “with fate,” known from the New Testament.
  • Syrus: Variant of Cyrus, meaning “lord” or “sun.”
  • Savvas: Variant of Sabbas, meaning “old man.”
  • Sarantis: Meaning “thirty.”
  • Sasa: Diminutive of names beginning with “Sas-.”
  • Savina: Feminine form of Savvas.
  • Sokrates: Variant of Sokratis, referring to the philosopher.
  • Solon: Name of a famous ancient Athenian lawmaker and poet.
  • Sophia: Variant of Sofia, meaning “wisdom.”
  • Spyridon: Variant of Spiridon, meaning “spirit.”
  • Spyros: Diminutive of Spyridon.
  • Stais: Diminutive of Eustathios, meaning “stable.”
  • Stamata: Feminine form of Stamatis.
  • Stamatios: Variant of Stamatis, meaning “stop.”
  • Stavroula: Feminine form of Stavros, meaning “cross.”
  • Stefania: Feminine form of Stefanos.
  • Stefanos: Greek form of Stephen, meaning “crown” or “wreath.”
  • Stella: Meaning “star.”
  • Stelios: Diminutive of Stylianos.
  • Styliani: Feminine form of Stylianos.
  • Sylvia: Latin origin, but used in Greek-speaking areas, meaning “forest.”
  • Sosipatros: Meaning “savior of the father.”
  • Sosigenes: Meaning “born of the savior.”
  • Sosos: Meaning “safe” or “unharmed.”
  • Sosthenes: Meaning “safe strength.”
  • Sotiris: Variant of Sotirios, meaning “salvation.”

T

greek names starting with letter T

  • Theodoros: Meaning “gift of God.”
  • Theodora: Feminine form of Theodoros, meaning “gift of God.”
  • Theophilos: Meaning “friend of God.”
  • Thekla: Feminine form of Theokleia, meaning “glory of God.”
  • Thalia: One of the nine Muses in Greek mythology, muse of comedy and pastoral poetry.
  • Thanos: Diminutive of Athanasios, meaning “immortal.”
  • Themistokles: Meaning “glory of the law.”
  • Theokleia: Meaning “glory of God.”
  • Theonas: Meaning “Godly.”
  • Theophania: Meaning “appearance of God,” often associated with the Epiphany.
  • Thrasos: Meaning “boldness” or “courage.”
  • Thucydides: The name of a famous ancient Greek historian.
  • Thais: The name of an ancient Greek courtesan who accompanied Alexander the Great.
  • Theron: Meaning “hunter.”
  • Thetis: In Greek mythology, a sea nymph and the mother of Achilles.
  • Timaios: Meaning “to honor.”
  • Timoleon: Meaning “honor of the people.”
  • Timosthenes: Meaning “strength in honor.”
  • Timotheos: Meaning “honoring God.”
  • Titos: Greek form of Titus, meaning “title of honor.”
  • Tasos: Diminutive of Anastasios, meaning “resurrection.”
  • Takis: Diminutive of Panagiotakis, a form of Panagiotis, meaning “all-holy.”
  • Talos: In Greek mythology, a giant man of bronze who protected Europa in Crete.
  • Tassos: Diminutive of Anastasios, meaning “resurrection.”
  • Terpsichore: One of the nine Muses in Greek mythology, muse of dance.
  • Telesphoros: Meaning “bringing to fulfillment” or “bearer of completion.”
  • Teodoros: Variant of Theodoros, meaning “gift of God.”
  • Teodora: Variant of Theodora, meaning “gift of God.”
  • Teofilos: Variant of Theophilos, meaning “friend of God.”
  • Terasa: A modern Greek name, possibly a variant of Teresa, which has Greek roots meaning “to reap,” “to harvest.”
  • Thalassa: Meaning “sea.”
  • Thaleia: Variant of Thalia, one of the nine Muses.
  • Thallo: In Greek mythology, one of the Horae representing spring and blooms.
  • Thalassini: Meaning “sea-colored” or “sea-green.”
  • Thanasis: Diminutive of Athanasios, meaning “immortal.”
  • Theano: A name borne by several ancient Greek women, meaning “Godly.”
  • Theodoulos: Meaning “slave of God.”
  • Theodosia: Feminine form of Theodosios, meaning “giving to God.”
  • Theogenis: Meaning “noble birth” or “born of God.”
  • Theokritos: The name of a famous Hellenistic Greek poet.
  • Theologos: Meaning “word of God” or “studying God.”
  • Theoni: Diminutive of Theophania, meaning “appearance of God.”
  • Thermopylae: Meaning “hot gates,” the famous battle site in Greece.
  • Thespis: Considered the founder of tragic Greek drama.
  • Thrasyvoulos: Meaning “bold in will” or “confident in counsel.”
  • Thymios: Diminutive of Timotheos, meaning “honoring God.”
  • Tryphon: Meaning “luxuriant” or “delicate.”
  • Trifon: Variant of Tryphon.
  • Tychon: Meaning “hitting the mark,” “fortunate.”
  • Tyche: The Greek goddess of fortune and luck.

U

greek names starting with letter U

  • Urania: One of the nine Muses in Greek mythology, the muse of astronomy.
  • Ulysses: The Latinized version of Odysseus, the hero of Homer’s epic poems.
  • Uranus: The primal Greek god personifying the sky.
  • Ursula: Although not of Greek origin, it has been used in Greek-speaking areas; it is of Latin origin, meaning “little bear.”

V

greek names starting with letter V

  • Vasilios: Meaning “royal” or “kingly,” the Greek form of Basil.
  • Vasileia: Feminine form of Vasilios, meaning “queen” or “royal.”
  • Valentinos: Greek form of Valentine, meaning “strong” or “healthy.”
  • Valeria: Feminine form of Valerios, used in Greek-speaking areas.
  • Valerios: Meaning “strong” or “healthy,” used in Greek-speaking areas.
  • Varvara: Greek form of Barbara, meaning “foreign” or “strange.”
  • Vasiliki: Feminine form of Vasilios, meaning “royal” or “kingly.”
  • Vaso: Diminutive of Vasiliki or Vasilios.
  • Vasos: Diminutive of Vasilios.
  • Vangelis: Diminutive of Evangelos, meaning “good news” or “gospel.”
  • Vasileios: Variant of Vasilios.
  • Vassilis: Diminutive of Vasilios.
  • Vaya: Possibly a variant of Vaea, a modern Greek name.
  • Venia: Meaning “grace” or “forgiveness.”
  • Venizelos: A surname of a famous Greek politician, Eleftherios Venizelos, often used as a given name.
  • Vera: Although of Slavic origin, meaning “faith,” it is also used in Greek-speaking areas.
  • Veronica: From the Greek phrase “Bere nike,” meaning “bringing victory,” used in Greek-speaking areas.
  • Vicky: Diminutive of Victoria, used in Greek-speaking areas.
  • Victoria: The Latin form of Nike, the Greek goddess of victory, used in Greek-speaking areas.
  • Violeta: From the Greek word “iole,” meaning “violet,” a flower name used in Greek-speaking areas.
  • Vissarion: Greek form of Bessarion, a name derived from the ancient city of Bessarion in Pontus.
  • Vito: Although of Latin origin, meaning “life,” it is sometimes used in Greek-speaking areas.
  • Vivian: Although of Latin origin, meaning “alive,” it is sometimes used in Greek-speaking areas.
  • Vlassis: Diminutive of Vlasios, a name derived from Saint Blaise, known as Agios Vlasios in Greek.
  • Voula: Diminutive of Vasiliki.
  • Vouliagmeni: Named after a coastal suburb of Athens, meaning “sunken.”
  • Vrasidas: An ancient Greek name.

W

greek names starting with letter W

  • Ouena (Wena): A possible Hellenized form of a foreign name; not a traditional Greek name.
  • Ouilliam (William): The English name William is sometimes rendered as Ouilliam in Greek for phonetic reasons, although it is not of Greek origin.

X

greek names starting with letter X

  • Xanthippe: Meaning “yellow horse,” the name of the wife of the philosopher Socrates.
  • Xenia: Meaning “hospitality,” derived from the Greek word for “foreigner” or “guest.”
  • Xenos: Meaning “foreigner” or “stranger.”
  • Xenophon: An ancient Greek historian and soldier, whose name means “foreign voice.”
  • Xerxes: The Greek form of the Persian name Khshayarsha, the name of two Persian kings.
  • Xanthos: Meaning “blond-haired.”
  • Xanthia: Feminine form of Xanthos, meaning “blond-haired.”
  • Xanthe: Meaning “blond” or “fair hair.”
  • Xenokrates: An ancient Greek philosopher, meaning “power of foreigners.”
  • Xenodokos: Meaning “host to strangers.”
  • Xylon: Meaning “wood” or “forest.”
  • Xylia: Feminine form of Xylon, meaning “of the forest.”
  • Xenokles: Meaning “glory of strangers.”
  • Xenophanes: An ancient Greek philosopher and poet, meaning “appearing foreign.”
  • Xenophos: A name meaning “foreign voice” or “strange voice.”
  • Xenocrates: Variant of Xenokrates.
  • Xenodemos: Meaning “guest of the people.”
  • Xenophilos: Meaning “friend of strangers.”
  • Xuthus: A figure in Greek mythology, a son of Hellen and the father of Ion and Achaeus.

Y

greek names starting with letter Y

  • Yannis: A common Greek name, it is the Greek form of John, meaning “God is gracious.”
  • Yiorgos: A common Greek name, it is the Greek form of George, meaning “farmer” or “earth-worker.”
  • Yiannis: Another variant of Yannis.
  • Yiorgos: Another variant of Yiorgos.
  • Yiota: A diminutive of the name Georgia, the feminine form of George.
  • Yiorgis: Another variant of Yiorgos.
  • Yioulia: A Greek form of Julia, meaning “youthful.”
  • Yiorgina: A variant of Georgina, the feminine form of George.
  • Yioryios: Another variant of Yiorgos.
  • Yioryianna: A variant of Georgianna, a feminine form of George.

Z

greek names starting with letter Z

  • Zoe: Meaning “life.”
  • Zeno: A name borne by several ancient Greek philosophers, meaning “gift of Zeus.”
  • Zenon: A variant of Zeno.
  • Zephyros: The Greek god of the west wind.
  • Zacharias: Greek form of Zechariah, meaning “Yahweh remembers.”
  • Zinovia: Feminine form of Zinovios, meaning “life of Zeus.”
  • Zinovios: Meaning “life of Zeus.”
  • Zografos: Meaning “painter” (from the act of drawing or painting).
  • Zosimos: Meaning “likely to survive” or “viable.”
  • Zotikos: Meaning “full of life.”
  • Zaharias: A variant of Zacharias.
  • Zisis: A modern Greek name, possibly a variant of Isidoros, meaning “gift of Isis,” though the origin is not certain.
  • Zacharoula: Feminine form of Zacharias.
  • Zachos: Diminutive of Zacharias.
  • Zafiris: Meaning “sapphire.”
  • Zamira: Not traditionally Greek, but used in Greek-speaking areas, it is of Hebrew origin, meaning “song” or “nightingale.”
  • Zena: A variant of Xenia, meaning “hospitality.”
  • Zenaida: Derived from Zeus, meaning “life of Zeus,” and associated with a saint in Greek Orthodox Christianity.
  • Zenovia: A variant of Zinovia.
  • Zephyra: Feminine form of Zephyros, referring to the west wind.
  • Zeta: Named after the sixth letter of the Greek alphabet, Ζ (zeta).
  • Zeuxis: An ancient Greek painter.
  • Zinon: A variant of Zenon.
  • Zoe: Although already mentioned, it bears repeating due to its popularity and simple elegance.
  • Zosime: Feminine form of Zosimos.

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